Kitchen Privileges: A Memoir

by Mary Higgins Clark

Hardcover, 2002

Collection

Description

"Even as a young girl, growing up in the Bronx, Mary Higgins Clark knew she wanted to be a writer. The gift of storytelling was a part of her Irish ancestry, so it followed naturally that she would later use her sharp eye, keen intelligence, and inquisitive nature to create stories about the people and things she observed."--BOOK JACKET.

Rating

(78 ratings; 3.6)

User reviews

LibraryThing member fsmichaels
A memoir of another time. Clark lived through the Great Depression as a child. Always interesting to see how the world has changed over the past almost-100 years through the eyes of someone who paid attention, and to see how someone got to where they are now.
LibraryThing member laws
I am a big fan of Mary Higgins Clake and I enjoy her books. When I came across this book at my library , I was just delighted to find out more about the author and her life. Mary went through many heartaches during her life esp. the loss of her Dad,age 54, and the death of her husband ,Warren. Mary pointed the many tradegies in her life including being a Stewardess for Pan AM Airlines, marriage, kids, widowhood, writng, and remarriage.MHC never up and went on to become one the best Mystery Writers in her genre.… (more)
LibraryThing member lostinalibrary
Kitchen Privileges is the memoir of Mary Higgins Clark, the mystery writer. More than a connected story, it seems like small vignettes from her life. It begins in her childhood around the time of her father's death and ends with her third marriage in 1996.

Hers is a story full of many tragedies yet her love of life and marvelous sense of humour shine through every page. I notice others mention that she could have spent more time on her writing but I think this story is perfect the way it is. She clearly loved to write but, more than that, she loves her family, her friends, life. it seems only right that she should start the story with the death of the first man she loved and end it with the last.

Whether you are a fan of her mysteries or memoirs or just want a story full of love and laughter, this is definitely a book worth reading.
… (more)
LibraryThing member klockrike
Boring. Sorry, I am sure you all readers of Mary Higgins Clark want to love this book, but it is not what you expect. It is shallow, without detail, full of expectated things and truly boring. Sorry, I tried to love this book, but it never came to life.
LibraryThing member turtlesleap
Clark's memoir is very brief but paints a vivid picture of growing up in a close-knit, affluent, Irish Catholic family in the Bronx during th 30's and 40's. This is a highly readable memoir. The writer is kind in her memories of people and events and her own drive and energy, while not particularly emphasized, are unmistakeable and impressive.… (more)
LibraryThing member BookConcierge
She may be the queen of suspense, but Clark's autobiography is only okay. She's led an interesting life and she is discreet, but I thought it would be more about her childhood, and it wasn't.
LibraryThing member dorisannn
I absolutely loved this book. Mary Higgins Clark was not looking for sympathy, but instead wrote a book filled with more laughter than tears. Just the bare outlines of her life could lend itself to a "poor me" tragedy, but she keeps it light and while I shed a few tears most of them were from laughing. She wrote of her second marriage which lasted seven years that it was a disaster. That's it. Mary just kept on writing, taking care of her five children and being a great success while maintaining her modesty as prescribed by her family and the "good Sisters" who taught her. Thanks for all the entertainment you have given to your readers, Mary.… (more)
LibraryThing member christinejoseph
her memoir —
she was rich, had tragedy ok read

In her long-awaited memoir, Mary Higgins Clark, America's beloved and bestselling Queen of Suspense, recounts the early experiences that shaped her as a person and influenced her as a writer. Even as a young girl, growing up in the Bronx, Mary Higgins Clark knew she wanted to be a writer. The gift of storytelling was a part of her Irish ancestry, so it followed naturally that she would later use her sharp eye, keen intelligence, and inquisitive nature to create stories about the people and things she observed.… (more)
LibraryThing member etxgardener
Mary Higgins Clark is one of those novelists who churns out 1-2 books every yer and continues to do so even though she is now 90.

This is a memoir of her life growing up in the Bronx, her school days and how she became a writer. It's a pleasant talw, but tehre is nothing here that's very dramatic, and it almost seems like after making tons of money for her publisher, they let her do this book as a vanity project.… (more)
LibraryThing member mumstheword
Sketchy bio of best selling author.
LibraryThing member howifeelaboutbooks
I used to read a lot of Mary Higgins Clark's books, and have actually read this one, years ago. I love it because it's really inspirational, without being over the top. Clark writes honestly and simply about her childhood and her dreams. While she has lost many loved ones, often closely together, she never dwells on it or asks for pity. Instead, she was always driven to find a better job to help support her mother and brothers, and later to support her five children. You'll find yourself tense as she gets rejection letters, then celebrating with her as the publishing offers start to roll in.… (more)
LibraryThing member nx74defiant
I learned a lot about Mary Higgins Clark.

She was a stewardess. She wrote for the radio. Her husband Warren's early death. It was very interesting.

Publication

Simon & Schuster (2002), 208 pages

Original publication date

2001

Pages

208

ISBN

0743206053 / 9780743206051

Language

Original language

English
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