The Nine Questions People Ask about Judaism

by Dennis Prager

Other authorsJoseph Telushkin
Book, 1975

Barcode

123458216

Call number

200 PRA

Publication

New York, N.Y. : Simon and Schuster, 1981, c1975.

Description

The classic and essential guide for the educated, skeptical, and searching Jew, or for the non-Jew who wants to understand the meaning of Judaism. If you have ever wondered what being born Jewish should mean to you; if you want to find out more about the nature of Judaism, or explain it to a friend; if you are thinking about how Judaism can connect with the rest of your life--this is the first book you should own. It poses, and thoughtfully addresses, questions like these: · Can one doubt God's existence and still be a good Jew? · Why do we need organized religion? · Why shouldn't I intermarry? · What is the reason for dietary laws? · How do I start practicing Judaism? Concisely and engagingly, authors Dennis Prager and Joseph Telushkin present Judaism as the rational, moral alternative for contemporary man or woman.… (more)

User reviews

LibraryThing member fingerpost
Were I Jewish, I would probably give this book a higher rating, because while some of the book is highly relevant to anyone interested in learning about Judaism, some of it is really only relevant to the Jewish reader. The first half of the book, questions 1 - 4, were fascinating and well
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written...
Can one doubt God's existence and still be a good Jew? Why do we need organized religion or Jewish Laws - Isn't it enough to be a good person? If Judaism is supposed to make you a better person, how do we account for unethical religious Jews and for ethical people who are not religious? And most fascinating: How does Judaism differ from Christianity, Marxism and Communism, and Humanism?
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LibraryThing member OptimisticCautiously
The first chapter/question is a must read for many people. However, the rest of the book is not as intelligently laid out as promised. In addition, I found myself quickly skipping pages or even entire sections due to deep philosophical disagreements: setting aside the obvious slant of orthodox
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Judaism and right-wing politics (which I can appreciate even if I disagree), I could not bear to read about the moral superiority of Judaism. Is this not the stuff of wars? Can be likened to Arianism? Perhaps I am too liberal with my belief that no group can call oneself superior, but I do believe the authors require a lesson in humility. I would be ashamed to present this book as representative of my views
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LibraryThing member OptimisticCautiously
The first chapter/question is a must read for many people. However, the rest of the book is not as intelligently laid out as promised. In addition, I found myself quickly skipping pages or even entire sections due to deep philosophical disagreements: setting aside the obvious slant of orthodox
Show More
Judaism and right-wing politics (which I can appreciate even if I disagree), I could not bear to read about the moral superiority of Judaism. Is this not the stuff of wars? Can be likened to Arianism? Perhaps I am too liberal with my belief that no group can call oneself superior, but I do believe the authors require a lesson in humility. I would be ashamed to present this book as representative of my views
Show Less
LibraryThing member thedenathome
Excellent basic book to learn about Judaism. Prager and Telushkin, childhood friends collaborated on this book over 40 years ago. It still stands as an excellent resource. Not only did I learn facts about being Jewish, I learned truth about how to think about life itself and how to think about
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transmitting your own values to the next generation.
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ISBN

0671622617 / 9780671622619

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