I am an American: A True Story of Japanese Internment: (ALA Notable Children's Book, Horn Book Fanfare Honor Book) (American History Classics)

by Jerry Stanley

Paperback, 1996

Status

Available

Collection

Publication

Crown Books for Young Readers (1996), 112 pages

Description

Illustrated with black-and-white photographs. Young Shi Nomura was among the 120,000 American citizens who lost everything when he was sent by the U.S. government to Manzanar, an interment camp in the California desert, simply because he was of Japanese ancestry.

Media reviews

Children's Literature
Susie Wilde (Children's Literature)
Photojournalist Jerry Stanley proves for a second time that he has an amazing gift for revealing history through individual lives. In this book he focuses on the upheaval that high school senior, Shi Nomura, faces when on the brink of engagement, is forced to spend three years behind the barbed wire of Manznar Relocation Camp. The book is filled with emotionally provocative stories and photos that give a strong sense of what it felt like to live through this period of time. Ages 10 up.

User reviews

LibraryThing member sosandra
I Am an American: a True Story of Japanese Internment is a compilation of stories from Japanese-American born internees intertwined together. The story follows Shi Nomura, an American-born male, who lost everything, when he was sent to an internment camp in Manzanar in the California desert, simply because he was of Japanese descent. It tells the compelling story of Shi’s desire to rise above the troubles of the camp and the separation from the girl he likes.
Jerry Stanley’s book is supported by true stories from Shi Nomura, Shi’s wife, and Shi’s close friends. The book retells the heartache of being separated from those he desired to be with and being yanked away from the life he once had. However, due to his resilient spirit, he found ways to overcome his oppression and hardships.
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LibraryThing member kthomp25
True story of Shi Nomura's experience of being interned along with his family in a Japanese internment camp during WWII. Families had days to dispose of all their property before being forcibly removed to camps in the West. Great loss of financial resources and personal belongings.

Pair with: Under the Blood Red Sun… (more)
LibraryThing member tfink
Young Shi Nomura was among the 120,000 American citizens who lost everything when he was sent by the U.S.government to Manzanar, an interment camp in the California desert, simply because he was of Japanese ancestry. I like that this book shows the struggles and not so good times in American history.
LibraryThing member Scott_Nilson
I really enjoyed reading this book. It is long so I should start by recommending the age group starting at about 9+ years old.

When World War II was discussed in my upbringing, Japanese internment was never mentioned. I clearly remember the explanation of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Hitlers intended extermination of Jewish people, and America's entry into the war with Japan and Germany.

This book actually starts out with information of Japanese immigrants prior to World War II and the affects of the Pearl Harbor bombing on Japanese-Americans.

Following the Executive Order 9066, Japanese-Americans were required by law to assemble in groups to be transported away from the California coast and be held against their will indefinitely in ramshackle housing camps; loosing their owned property, houses, vehicles, and money. The only thing they were allowed to bring was whatever they could fit into two suitcases.

This book provides an important piece of history to cover when discussing Hitler's deplorable conduct with Jewish people.
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Language

Original language

English

Physical description

112 p.; 8 inches

ISBN

0517885514 / 9780517885512

Barcode

471
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