Mozart's women : his family, his friends, his music

by Jane Glover

Paper Book, 2005

Status

Available

Publication

London : Macmillan, 2005.

Description

A new biography, told through the prism of the women in Mozart's life, focusing initially on his precocious childhood and relationship with his mother, sister and the Weber sisters, one of whom became his wife, and finally concluding with his premature death and the fate of the women who shaped his life.

User reviews

LibraryThing member omphalos02
Maybe a little dry for those who have no interest in the behind the scenes stories of most of Mozart's vocal works, but I still enjoyed it.
LibraryThing member arielgm
Jane Glover is Music Director of Chicago’s Music of the Baroque, and an internationally known conductor. Her lifelong involvement with the music of Mozart has included a long-standing interest in his sister, wife, and the other women in his circle. She acknowledges that she has “done no original research in dusty libraries” (390) for this book, relying instead on the numerous existing biographies. Mozart’s Women therefore adds a different perspective rather than new knowledge, or a new interpretation of existing knowledge to the already crowded field of Mozart biography. The four sections, “Mozart’s Family”, “Mozart’s Other Family”, “Mozart’s Women” and “After Mozart” are practical, though a little clunky in their rearrangement of chronology for the sake of manageability. The third section contains the most detailed exposition of Glover’s expertise, and is presumably the most innovative, though I’m sorry to say that I do not know enough about the music to judge adequately. Interesting and accessible though the book is, I think Glover is trying to cover too much territory. Given her specialist knowledge, a more detailed treatment of a narrower sphere (Nannerl Mozart or the Weber sisters, or the operatic roles) might have been more satisfying. That, or a much longer book.… (more)
LibraryThing member arielgm
Jane Glover is Music Director of Chicago’s Music of the Baroque, and an internationally known conductor. Her lifelong involvement with the music of Mozart has included a long-standing interest in his sister, wife, and the other women in his circle. She acknowledges that she has “done no original research in dusty libraries” (390) for this book, relying instead on the numerous existing biographies. Mozart’s Women therefore adds a different perspective rather than new knowledge, or a new interpretation of existing knowledge to the already crowded field of Mozart biography. The four sections, “Mozart’s Family”, “Mozart’s Other Family”, “Mozart’s Women” and “After Mozart” are practical, though a little clunky in their rearrangement of chronology for the sake of manageability. The third section contains the most detailed exposition of Glover’s expertise, and is presumably the most innovative, though I’m sorry to say that I do not know enough about the music to judge adequately. Interesting and accessible though the book is, I think Glover is trying to cover too much territory. Given her specialist knowledge, a more detailed treatment of a narrower sphere (Nannerl Mozart or the Weber sisters, or the operatic roles) might have been more satisfying. That, or a much longer book.… (more)
LibraryThing member trinibaby9
The first half of this book was great. It gave alot of insight into his life. The second portion after his death could have been cut out entirely it really just repeated what had been said in the first half of the book. Worth reading though.
LibraryThing member PamelaManasco
Still working through it, but it's an intriguing read so far.

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