Philosophy and social hope

by Richard Rorty

Paperback, 1999

Status

Available

Publication

London : Penguin, 1999.

Description

"One of the most provocative figures in recent philosophical and wider literary and cultural debate, Richard Rorty brings together in this collection a wide range of philosophical, political and cultural writings, many published in book form for the first time. He explains how he began to move away from Plato towards James and Dewey, culminating in his own version of pragmatism. What matters, he suggests, is not whether our ideas correspond to some fundamental reality but whether they help us carry out practical tasks and create a fairer and more democratic society. In an introduction called 'Relativism' and a (previously unpublished) afterword on the unfortunate popularity of the term 'postmodern', Rorty responds to charges that he is a 'postmodern relativist'."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

User reviews

LibraryThing member petergiger
This is definitly one of my favorit books.
LibraryThing member aevaughn
I didn't agree with 75% of what Rorty said, but he brings up a lot of subjects that need be brought up. Also, the thing that I love about Rorty that is his call to the Left to focus on national politics and hope. This brings to my mind two things. First, activists often focus on what needs to be changed. Inequalities in America, etc. These of course need to be corrected. Rorty asks reminds us that America should be a Nation of Hope as well. Secondly, he says that the academics need to join with the unions and work together to achieve this hope. Rorty also talks about many other things since this book is mainly a collection of his essays, but this is what he is struck me.… (more)
LibraryThing member Darrol
This is one of the more inspiring books in my collection (except I do not believe in the spirit--I do believe in the spirit of this book, but not the spirit, per se). But it does encourage me in several areas: Politics, Ethics, Patriotism. Despite the fact it does sound some serious warnings in the latter essays--about the difficulties of maintaining liberal democracy in the future.… (more)
LibraryThing member jddunn
A book that I think had a lot to do with shaping my ideas about ideas… what they can and can’t do, where they can be dangerous, and what hopes there are for harnessing them to make human life markedly better.

Language

Barcode

3441
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