Dear Miss Breed

by Joanne Oppenheim

Hardcover, 2005

Status

Available

Publication

New York : Scholastic, 2005.

Description

Provides the story of life in a Japanese internment camp during World War II through the correspondence of the children in the camp to their librarian, Miss Clara Breed, who worked on their behalf to show the injustice of their imprisonment.

User reviews

LibraryThing member Lake_Oswego_UCC
True story of librarian who kept in contact with neighborhood Japanese American children sent to relocation camps throughout the west in the Second World War.
LibraryThing member YouthGPL
Susan says: This book was part of my Children’s Literature class that I took last fall, and I never got around to reading it. I thought it would be really interesting because it talked about a librarian from San Diego, and Japanese Americans who were in an internment camp in Arizona. A shorter book might have been of more interest. As it is, this is a history of this specific group of San Diegans during WWII, and their history in the camps, mainly at Poston. It is extremely thorough, but I am not sure who the target audience would be. While I think kids could use it for research, I think there are not many children of the right age who are actually doing projects on this. I also had problems with the tone quite often – Oppenheim really castigates the government for calling things having to do with the Japanese Americans protective custody, when really the government believed they were protecting the rest of the Americans. I think we all know this was wrong, and it felt like she was injecting her personal bias into the history. I can imagine that this book is very popular in San Diego, but it took me over a week to read, and it did drag on.… (more)
LibraryThing member bettyjo
oral history of the treatment of Japanese Americans during WWII
LibraryThing member abbylibrarian
An interesting, though sprawling, book about children in the Japanese internment camps during WWII and one librarian who kept in touch with many of them. Many photos are included along with letters from children in the camps. A great book to look through, but it's very long and not very focused, so I ended up skimming the second half of it. This would be a nice companion book to a more concise history of the internment camps.… (more)
LibraryThing member ark76
The focus of this book is an in depth look a WWII internment camps through the eyse of a t a young female librarian and the relationship she fostered with the children whom she had served that were "relocated" into internment camps for those of Japanese ancestry on the West coast. The majority of the book depicts the experiences of the children and their relationship with the librarian through the publication of letters written to their beloved Miss Breed. It is a one way conversation as Miss Breed's letters to them have not survived. The author enhances this information with a history of the internment program and Miss Breed's efforts to publicize the inequal and racist policies of this program. As a student pursuing a Masters in Library Science, I recommend this book for all future librarians to remind us of the far-reaching role of a librarian - that by serving information needs, we also are serving human needs. I also recommend this book for students in middle and high school studying the aspects of US history that involve: prejudice, government injustice, the holocaust. The voices of the children will make this book meaningful and easy to read and gives a different perspective not often heard.… (more)
LibraryThing member flackm
This book is based on real life letters between students interned during World War II and their librarian. It's a great demonstration of compassion in the face of trauma and injustice. I love this book because it acts as a reminder to be sensitive to the victims of conflict and mistreatment based on their ethnicity.
LibraryThing member flackm
This book is based on real life letters between students interned during World War II and their librarian. It's a great demonstration of compassion in the face of trauma and injustice. I love this book because it acts as a reminder to be sensitive to the victims of conflict and mistreatment based on their ethnicity.
LibraryThing member KarenElissa
A unique perspective on the Japaneses interment, told from the letters of children and teens written to a librarian in San Diego. I enjoyed the letters and hearing the first hand accounts from the children. On the down side, the author does a bit too much sermonizing at certain points, I'd prefer to let the letters just speak for them selves. Also, a minor point, the book is rather oversized which makes it not so convenient.… (more)
LibraryThing member Melina_Hiatt_Easter
Children's librarian at San Diego Public Library, Clara Breed became friends with many Japanese-American children. When war broke out and they were sent to internment camps, they exchanged letters and care packages. This book attempts to use the primary source letters as well as interviews to weave a story that highlights the plight of Japanese-Americans during World War II. Along with Courage Has No Color, students can explore the discrimination faced by multiple ethnicities during this troubling time in American history.… (more)

Language

Local notes

inscribed by author

Barcode

5215
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