The Family of man : the 30th anniversary edition of the classic book of photography

by Edward Steichen

Paper Book, 1955

Status

Available

Publication

New York, N.Y. : The Museum : Distributed by Simon & Schuster, 1983, c1955.

Description

Hailed as the most successful and inspiring exhibition of photography ever assembled The Family of Man opened at The Museum of Modern Art in January 1955. This book, the permanent embodiment of Steichen's monumental exhibition, reproduces all of the 503 images that Steichen described as "a mirror of the essential oneness of mankind throughout the world... Photographs, made in all parts of the world, of the gamut of life from birth to death... Photographs of lovers and marriage and child-bearing... Photographs concerned with man's dreams and aspirations and photographs of the flaming creative forces of love and truth and the corrosive evil inherent in the lie." This is a classic and inspiring work, in print for more than forty years.

User reviews

LibraryThing member oook
This book has been with me since 1955, and it surely was the foundation for the photographic aesthetic I've been working on ever since I first was galvanized by the images.
LibraryThing member PghDragonMan
One of the greatest photojournalism exhibits ever mounted. While some of the Western clothing appears dated, the poses and interactions captured from all over the world are timeless. If you ever doubted we are one family, look at these photographs. The title is really what it is all about.
LibraryThing member viviennestrauss
After watching a wonderful documentary on Steichen (for the 4th time) I decided to look for this book, found it online at MOMA but lucked out even better - found a copy at my local library bookstore!
LibraryThing member mahallett
i wanted more info about the photos and the photographers. i know that wasn't the idea of the exhibit.
LibraryThing member EudesDeParis
What a shock to see my aunt photographed in here. That alone gets a five-star rating for the collection.

Language

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