Journey from the land of no

by Ruʾyā Ḥakkākiyān

Paperback, 2004

Status

Available

Publication

New York : Three Rivers Press, 2004.

Description

"In Journey from the Land of No Roya Hakakian recalls her childhood and adolescence in prerevolutionary Iran. The result is a coming-of-age story about one deeply intelligent and perceptive girl's attempt to find an authentic voice of her own at a time of cultural closing and repression. She manages to re-create a time and place dominated by religious fanaticism, violence, and fear with an open heart and often with great humor." "Hakakian was twelve years old in 1979 when the revolution swept through Tehran. The daughter of an esteemed poet, she grew up in a household that hummed with intellectual life. But the Hakakians were also part of the very small Jewish population in Iran who witnessed the iron fist of the Islamic fundamentalists increasingly tightening its grip. It is with the innocent confusion of youth that Roya describes her discovery of a swastika - "a plus sign gone awry, a dark reptile with four hungry claws" - painted on the wall near her home. As a schoolgirl she watched as friends accused of reading blasphemous books were escorted from class by Islamic Society guards, never to return. Only much later did Roya learn that she was spared a similar fate because her teacher admired her writing." "Hakakian relates in the most poignant, and at times painful, ways what life was like for women after the country fell into the hands of Islamic fundamentalists who had declared an insidious war against them, but we see it all through the eyes of a strong, youthful optimist who somehow came up in the world believing that she was different, knowing she was special. At her loneliest, Roya discovers the consolations of writing while sitting on the rooftop of her house late at night. And she discovers the craft that would ultimately enable her to find her own voice and become her own person."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

User reviews

LibraryThing member Seajack
I confess I was slightly bored by the first half of the story: pre-teen Jewish girl's life in pre-Revolutionary Tehran; that section does make a point that opposition to the Shah was widespread, far from just a radical Moslem "thing". Second part (post-Revolution) is much stronger, though the story ends as the family makes the final decision to emigrate, with a "teaser" that the story of their journey might be forthcoming as a sequel; there is an epilogue telling of the "fate" of most of the main characters at the time the book went to press.… (more)
LibraryThing member kikianika
Beautifully written account of a girl growing up in revolutionary Iran in the late 70s. I loved the plain language especially. It wasn't intellectualised, but just a straight tale, well told. And I suppose it goes to show that women in revolution countries are always the asme. Idealistic, hopeful and ultimately suppressed.
LibraryThing member Risa15
The writing was very descriptive and this memoir of a young Jewish girl growing up in Iran held my interest throughout
LibraryThing member kikilon
Beautifully written account of a girl growing up in revolutionary Iran in the late 70s. I loved the plain language especially. It wasn't intellectualised, but just a straight tale, well told. And I suppose it goes to show that women in revolution countries are always the asme. Idealistic, hopeful and ultimately suppressed.
LibraryThing member cransell
Pairing this book with Lipstick Jihad, you get a good overall view of the effect of the revolution in Iran, from it's beginning to the present day - especially on women.
LibraryThing member atiara
The author's style is a bit too poetic for my taste, but still engrossing. The title says it all.

Language

Barcode

7273
Page: 0.1979 seconds