The Dinner Party: A Symbol of our Heritage

by Judy Chicago

Paper Book, 1979

Status

Available

Publication

Garden City, N.Y. : Anchor Press/Doubleday, 1979.

Description

When Judy Chicago's multimedia exhibit The Dinner Party opened in the late 1970s, it was almost as shocking to the art world and to society at large as the first exhibit of Impressionists nearly a century before. And like that art, it stretched the limits of artistic vision and expression, soon becoming a landmark in art history. A symbolically rich and complex visual chronicle of the achievements of more than 1,000 women in Western civilization, The Dinner Party has been seen by nearly a million viewers worldwide. Judy Chicago's earlier books about the exhibit are now collector's items. In this new work, the artist takes you on a personal tour of The Dinner Party, discussing it genesis, aesthetic and historical meaning, now and for the future. Many new illustrations highlight this account, which celebrates the work's reemergence in an exhibition at the UCLA/Armand Hammer Museum and Cultural Center in Los Angeles.… (more)

User reviews

LibraryThing member woolenough
I had the good fortune to acquire this commemorative volume at the 1996 showing of Judy Chicago's "Dinner Party" in Los Angeles. The room-sized artwork itself is intended to describe the struggle of women throughout history to achieve full participation in society and it makes extensive use of the traditional "feminine" art of needlework.

The book would, I think, give an excellent idea of the installation for anyone who has never seen it. There is one color plate of the entire room with its dimmed lighting that conveys the atmosphere of near religious awe experienced by those who walked slowly and quietly around it. Additional color plates show close-ups of the individual place settings and details of embroidery.

The book also has a section for each of the historical periods, with biographies of the women honored, as well as an introduction that describes the creation of the work and its early, controversial years.
… (more)
LibraryThing member Buecherei.das-Sarah
A symbol of our heritage
LibraryThing member deckla
Judy Chicago really began the feminist art movement. Her artistic and historical scope was and is unprecedented. The Dinner Party first brought attention to hundreds upon hundreds of overlooked women ignored by history.

Language

Barcode

8086
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