The Gay Science: With a Prelude in Rhymes and an Appendix of Songs

by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

Other authorsWalter Kaufmann (Translator)
Paper Book, 1974

Status

Available

Publication

New York, Vintage Books [1974]

Description

This text explores the role of postitive thinking and how to overcome anxiety in everyday life. It offers an overview of the basic unease we feel, how it evolved and its true source. The book goes on to describe the methods of meditation and explores the application of these methods to emotional, physical and personal problems.

User reviews

LibraryThing member jculkin
The Gay Science: the source of and solution to all your worries about lack of meaning in life. That is how it feels right now anyway.

I came to this book to find out Nietzsche's interpretation of reality and framework of life; what was his answer to the question - what should one do? As to interpretation of reality it is hard to be disappointed; there are so many compelling conclusions on all aspects of humanity, language, morality and existence - delivered on the most part with wit and clarity. Here and there it is spoiled by the odd super long sentence or vague metaphor that tests the limits of comprehension, but it is still a gold-mine of ideas in bite-size chunks. Recipe for two: read a few pages on a low heat, set simmering for 20 minutes (perhaps go for a walk or bike ride) and serve immediately to a companion. For me its been the source of most of the best topics of conversation for the last half year.

What about a framework of life? Philosophy for me is the attempt to concisely describe reality and help us decide how to live - to arrive at a theory/framework, relying on the most irreducible and unshakable axioms, which singles out some courses of action as the better ones. I did not find anything like this. After all the talk of his free spirit type, I arrive at perhaps contradictory conclusions: on the one hand I have many scattered ideas about the life he presents persuasively as a good one, but on the other hand I hear the louder message 'Be yourself!'.I wonder if such things as axioms and basic truths existed in Nietzsche's head and he chose not to present things that way - or whether he really did think as he wrote.

He persuades me better than books on Buddhism did to mistrust dichotomies - I feel like he has succeeded where they failed because he reasoned more forcefully the many contradictions we can stumble upon when demanding clear reasoned black-and-white everlasting truths. I am left feeling more alone and lost than ever in my head, but more at peace and at home in the universe. I feel less secure of my ideas about how to live, but far less urgency to remedy that. I feel profoundly happier, and equally sad. Everything, everything, everything.
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LibraryThing member P_S_Patrick
The majority if this book consists of just under 400 short pieces, between a few lines and couple of pages in length, in which Nietzsche delivers his profound reflexions and aphorisms. There are also a few poems at the beginning and the end. .
The outlook of the pieces are quite varied, and if you flicked though, picked one, and read it, you might be cheered up, made to think about a miscellaneous issue, pushed towards an existential abyss, or just feel like going outside for walk. I will list a small selection of the varied headings of the pieces that stood out to me as I flicked through just now:
"The Danger of Vegetarians", "Too Oriental", "The Origin of Religion", "Dignity of Folly", "Against Remorse", "Work and Ennui", "Epicurus",
"The Way to Happiness"
There is quite a variety of things that are written about in this book, which might give it more appeal than some of his other ones. The way that Nietzsche writes is not technical, but his ideas will be more easily received by some people than others. I happen to agree with a lot of it, but some of it is also subversive, he entices us with the poetic sentiment, but after analysis we realise it is callous, or amoral.
Due to the structure of the book, and the fact that a lot seems to be said in each of the pieces, it will probably be a book that the reader will come back to, and re-read, after the initial reading. I did read the book right through, but it would be easy to read one piece and then spend five minutes thinking about it, over a cup of tea, then move onto another.
But if you don't like to think about deep issues, are intellectually squeamish, or don't like philosophy, then you will probably want to avoid this book. But for anyone who likes to think, then this is a book that will be quite enjoyed.
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LibraryThing member mrellis64
Imagine, if you will, that you (and everyone else) had to keep living the same life over and over again for eternity. What changes would you make? Nietzsche’s theory of the Eternal Recurrence should make us all stop and examine the lives we are leading. A must read!
LibraryThing member gmicksmith
This edition is on my iPad and is a handy reference work in regards to Nietzsche.
LibraryThing member ccavaleri
Next to Ambrose Bierce's Devil's Dictionary, The Gay Science is my favorite source of clever soundbites about various topics, so invest in an edition with an index!
LibraryThing member gmicksmith
This work remains one of the essential works of Nietzsche perhaps the fourth most important work he wrote.

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