Paris Spleen (New Directions Paperbook)

by Charles Baudelaire

Other authorsLouise Varèse (Translator)
Paperback, 1970

Status

Available

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Publication

New Directions (1970), Edition: F First Edition, 118 pages

User reviews

LibraryThing member misirlou
Inspired by Bertrand's Gaspard de la Nuit Baudelaire borrowed the idea of turning french poetry on its head by releasing this collection of prose poems. The real virtues of the poetry, the play with language, internal rhyme, and grammar, don't come through very strongly in translation.

Luckily for Baudelaire's english speaking audience, the subjects of his poems were so rich and his imagery was so vivid that even after all of those elements are lost, his poetry still stands up under scrutiny. The only downside of this collection is that it's not a dual language version-- even if you don't speak a foreign language you can still get a sense for its rythym by comparing the original and the translation side by side.

The prose poems in this collection (and the ones in Les Fleurs du Mal) focus on the internal life of the city. Ina time when Paris was being systematically destroyed and rebuilt, Baudelaire looks past the veneer of the city to the heart of its citizens. While British poets from the same time lose themselves in the architecture of the city and in the city's natural elements, Baudelaire and his contemporaries focused specifically on the people that make up the city.

Paris Spleen gives you an outsider's look into Parisian life. As the narrator of these pieces moves through the city, he shares his assumptions about life as seen through windows, as passed on corners, as watched but not necessarily participated in. When the narrator actually does take part in the world around him, he does so with gestures so grand that they exist only for the sake of metaphor. In one instance, the narrator berates a glass dealer for harassing the poor and tosses a flower pot at him. In another, men are described as carrying chimeras on their backs as they go through their daily routines.

Although at times the narrative leans towards the surreal, the images are accessable and each poem flows quickly. If you can't read the poems in their original language, this is a great translation to pick up.
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LibraryThing member Porius
heavy and elastic honeybrown hair. you can almost hear it?!
LibraryThing member poetontheone
One of the the earliest examples of prose poetry, Baudelaire's Paris Spleen is a tribute to the city of Paris and its pleasures: poetry, wine, women and the drunkenness brought about by these pursuits. Let's not forget Baudelaire's old pal Satan, he rears his head here more than once. Also present here is Baudelaire's witty political commentaries, presented in perhaps a more discernible form here than in The Flowers of Evil.
Paris Spleen is not as consistent in regards to 'quality' (Rather a bad choice of words here, I do not want to mislead any ignorant reader into thinking Baudelaire is any less than great) or as urgent in tone as its more wide read predecessor. Overall though, this an indispensable for all students of poetry as well as those "moon-mad men." We couldn't forget them, now could we?
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LibraryThing member TheBooknerd
This is a good book for anyone new to Baudelaire or prose poems. Several great poems are included.
LibraryThing member JimmyChanga
I never really understood the appeal of Les Fleurs du Mal, but so many people love it that I started to feel bad. What was I missing? Along comes this book, Paris Spleen, which is full of prose poems made of equal parts humor, cynicism, and insight (and often all three within a paragraph). I like these poems because reading it, I feel like I have a sense of who Baudelaire might have been as a person...

Plus, his humor is so odd:

Soup and Clouds

My adorable little minx was serving me supper; through the dining room's open window I was contemplating the shifting architectures God creates from vapour, those marvellous constructions of the evanescent. As I watched, I thought: "Those apparitions are nearly as beautiful as my sweet lady's eyes, the mad little green-eyed monster."

Suddenly a violent fist landed in my back and I heard a charming, raw voice hysterical and brandy-damaged, the voice of my little darling, saying: "Get on with your bloody soup, cloud merchant."
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Language

Original language

English

Barcode

6550
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