Aphrodite: A Memoir of the Senses

by Isabel Allende

Other authorsa Margaret Sayers Peden (Translator)
Paperback, 1999

Status

Available

Publication

Harper Perennial (1999), Edition: 1st HarperPerennial Ed, 320 pages

Description

Personal and idiosyncratic look at the intertwined sensual arts of food and love. Blends personal reminiscence with folklore, historical legends, literature and facts about the aphrodisiac powers of food and drink.

User reviews

LibraryThing member riofriotex
Although subtitled as a memoir, this is really more of a part cookbook, part anthology. Allende wrote this after "Paula," a memoir that ended with the death of her 28-year-old daughter after a year in a coma from a genetic condition at the end of 1992. A grief-stricken Allende thought she might never write again, but creating this lighthearted book helped restore her. It’s a lovely blend of recipes and research on food and drinks that have erotic properties or aphrodisiac power, mixed with folklore, a pinch of history and literary excerpts, and some of Allende’s own experiences. Most of the recipes were developed by Allende’s mother and are grouped into sections on appetizers, salads, soups, main dishes, sides, and desserts. I learned some … interesting things about some foods that I can’t repeat here! (well, okay, here's one suggestion from page 59: "Try long, firm asparagus served with two new potatoes at the base of the stem...")

This was a fun read but probably not very practical as a cookbook, unless you are a cookbook collector.
… (more)
LibraryThing member estellen
Recipes, stories and fantasies - sensual and anecdotal fun...
LibraryThing member spacecommuter
Luscious and frothy...just a fun book all around to read. It features recipes that supposedly stir the senses (and other things besides). It's a great thing to read immediately after finishing the equally quirky and ethereal "Law of Love" by Laura Esquivel. Or maybe that's just me.
LibraryThing member AnnieHidalgo
No one author has ever done more to introduce me to the sensuality of food. And rice pudding, no less. There were many, many other foods mentioned, but that one will always stand out. This book is a biography, with interspersed recipes. Forget an island getaway - my idea of the perfect romantic weekend may involve this book, Laura Esquivel's Like Water For Chocolate, and a few recipes from Nigella Lawson. Ok, that's not ALL it would involve, but the way to the human heart is through the stomach, isn't it? That saying isn't just for men. (Or for people with a very poor grasp of anatomy - thanks, Terry Pratchett). Mmm, food....Figs, and oysters, and champagne, and a night under the stars... you should read this book. You won't be sorry.… (more)
LibraryThing member anglophile65
I was so taken by this book years ago, that I'm very interested in reading it again since I have no memories of what it was about, just that I loved it :)
LibraryThing member mrsdanaalbasha
This book should be banned for people younger than 18; with that said I read it at 18 and found it grotesque. I enjoyed the recipes, some stories but the rest of the short stories and tales were horrific to me and quite sexual. I found it exaggerated and inordinate. Not my cup of tea.
LibraryThing member mrsdanaalbasha
This book should be banned for people younger than 18; with that said I read it at 18 and found it grotesque. I enjoyed the recipes, some stories but the rest of the short stories and tales were horrific to me and quite sexual. I found it exaggerated and inordinate. Not my cup of tea.

Language

Original language

Spanish

Barcode

11057
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