Truman

by David McCullough

Paper Book, 1992

Status

Available

Publication

New York: Simon & Schuster, 1992. Advance Uncorrected Reader's Proof with glossy publicity photo laid in. Inscribed and dated in year of publication to Leroy Soper, then head of the University Book Store in Seattle

Description

Drawing on newly discovered archival material and extensive interviews with Truman's own family, friends, and Washington colleagues, McCullough tells the deeply moving story of the seemingly ordinary "man from Missouri" who was perhaps the most courageous president in our history.

Media reviews

THROUGH most of his nearly eight years as President, Harry Truman was profoundly unpopular. Joe Martin, the Republican Speaker of the House in the late 1940's, called Truman "the worst President in history." Liberals so despaired of him during his first term that they tried to draft Dwight D. Eisenhower to replace him as the Democratic nominee in 1948. Even among the many who liked Truman personally, there was always a tendency to view him as one member of the Cabinet did on April 12, 1945, the day Franklin Roosevelt died. Truman was sitting alone in a big leather chair against a wall in the Cabinet Room of the White House, waiting for the Chief Justice to arrive and swear him in as President. The Cabinet member glanced at him and later remembered thinking: "He looks like such a little man."

Truman's popularity revived at times during his Presidency, most notably during his remarkable campaign for re-election in 1948. But the revivals were always brief. The real rehabilitation of his reputation -- the process that has turned him into something of a folk hero -- began later, well after he left office, and has accelerated in the 20 years since his death. Its culmination may be "Truman," David McCullough's warm, affectionate and thoroughly captivating biography. "Truman," Mr. McCullough writes near the end of this long book, "held to the old guidelines: work hard, do your best, speak the truth, assume no airs, trust in God, have no fear." He was "a figure of world stature, both a great and good man, and a great American President." . . .
1 more
No brief review can begin to do justice either to Truman or to the monumentally persuasive job McCullough has done re-creating his life and times.

User reviews

LibraryThing member chrissie3
I listened to the audiobook format of this book, that means more than 54 hours, and I enjoyed every minute of it. Little content could have been removed. The narration by Nelson Runger was wonderful. I have complained about his slurping before, but the producers have removed the slurps. His steady clear pace perfectly matches the informative text. His intonation for Truman, was perfect, both the strength of his speeches in the presidency and his reflections, to-the-point remarks and sarcastic jokes of the elderly man. Our voice does change with age, and Runger has mastered this. (Some voices were, however, in my opinion, too low and ponderous.) At the end, and this is a book that covers all aspects of Truman’s life, from birth to death, i.e. 1884-1972, there were tears in my eyes. This is a book about a man dedicated to fighting for his beliefs, but he was a politician at heart. Keep in mind that I tend to instinctively distrust politicians. It is rather remarkable that I so loved this book. I will try to never again shy away from a book about politicians……well, at least such books written by John McCullough.

Why did I love this book? You learn about American life and values as they were when America was still a land of pioneers to what it had become by the middle of the 20th Century. What the political parties stood for has changed dramatically with time. On completion of this book you have a thorough understanding of the American party system. You travel from an agrarian Midwest value mindset through WW1, the Depression, the New Deal, WW2, the emergence of atomic weapons, the birth of the UN and NATO, the Berlin blockade and successful airlift, the Cold War and McCarthyism, the focus on civil rights, the Korean War all the way up to Kennedy’s presidency. You follow this time-period through the life of a man living through its events, and a man who as president shaped many of these events. McCullough gives you a thorough understanding of all these events and a thorough understanding of the man Truman.

It is an honest book that never shies away from the mistakes made. I wasn’t thrilled with Truman’s friendship and dependence upon Pendergast. I felt that Truman’s relationship with his wife was at first not adequately clarified. By the end I understood Truman, all of him. I believe I comprehend both his familial relationships and the value he put on friendships, which explain his relationship with Pendergast . You see both the good and the bad. I very much admire the strength and forthrightness of Truman who was at heart a marvelous politician. Yes, definitely a politician who fought for his party and made mistakes, but dam he tried his best. Always. He never shirked his responsibilities. He never ran away from a problem, but faced them head on. He was not infallible. I still don’t understand why they never had more children……

I was born in 1951. I understand now what my parents lived through and why they were who they were. I understand now what lead up to the world I was born into. I totally loved this book.

Completed April 20, 2013
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LibraryThing member kaulsu
If I were to add something to this book, if would be a second, later, set of pictures. If I were to change something about the book, I would make shorter sections. There is no escaping it is a very, very long book, but there is nothing that should have been omitted.
LibraryThing member bjmitch
This review has been some time coming. The trade paperback edition I read is 992 pages plus acknowledgements, footnotes, bibliography, and index. Practically got a hernia carrying it around. I also had commitments to review other books so I had to put it aside occasionally to read and review shorter books, usually fiction. Despite a weekend of football watching, though, I finally finished it Sunday afternoon. Now I'm almost sorry it's done.

Anyone who loves history and biography as much as I do knows David McCullough writes like a storyteller. His prose is never dry, boring, or academic, yet he unfailingly tells the reader what is important to know about a person or an event.

I thought I knew a lot about Harry Truman, a fellow Midwesterner, but I didn't. I simply understood "where he was coming from" as the kids say. His childhood as a farm boy who wore glasses and was also a dedicated student was delightful to read about. In Sunday school he fell hard for a little girl with golden curls and beautiful eyes, Bess Wallace. She was his only love but they didn't marry until they were in their 30s. Mama Wallace never did consider Harry good enough for her daughter, even when she was dying in the White House near the end of his time as President of the United States. Regardless, he never said a bad word about her, ever.

Now that I know the truth about his spell as Tom Pendergast's candidate for county office and the enduring reputation as a product of that political machine, I understand a bit more about why my grandfather had such a low opinion of Truman. Of course, he would have felt that way anyway since Truman was a Democrat which made him, in Gramps' eyes, a spawn of the Devil. Hard to believe this liberal Democrat (me) came from such a staunch Republican family, but I did because when I was old enough to think things out for myself, that was the way I believed. That was a matter I never discussed with Gramps. He would have been horrified.

We were city people, but farmers and small town folks loved Truman. When he went on his whistle stop tour running for president on his own, he stopped in the small towns and he talked their language. They loved his honesty, his humbleness, the way he introduced Bess as "the boss," and his knowledge of their cares and worries. (Although one time she told him if he introduced her thus one more time, she was going to get off the train and go home.) They also appreciated his service in World War I, as a captain of artillery. The men he commanded were to remain his good friends for the rest of his life and participate as honor guards at his inaugural parade.

His Achilles heel was daughter Margaret. No one could criticize her singing or anything else about her without feeling the full strength of Truman's wrath. He had begun to think he would never realize his desire to be a grandfather when she stayed single so long, but eventually she married and Truman would hold the first of four grandsons in his arms just a few days after he was born. Doting grandpa was his proud title from then on.

It was fascinating to read about his taking office after Roosevelt's death. FDR had not liked him very much, and didn't include him in briefings and conferences, so suddenly Truman had a huge learning curve immediately ahead of him. He pulled himself up by his own bootstraps as people used to say and did very well. He was fortunate enough to find some of the best men in the country to man the cabinet and be his advisors. Dean Acheson, in fact, was a close friend until his death.

His performance in Potsdam was surprising to Stalin and Churchill. One of my favorite quotes in the book is from Churchill. He wrote in 1952, "I misjudged you badly. Since that time you more than any other man, have saved Western civilization." (p. 875)

Whether to use the atomic bomb is another period I'm glad to know more about, and Korea. To know what went on in the background and the agony those decisions cost him was a revelation to me. Once a decision was made, he stuck with it no matter how many critics condemned him.

I won't go on but, in short, this is one of the best biographies I've ever read. Thank you David McCullough for giving us this wonderful story, the life of a controversial man who was so vital in our history.

Highly recommended
Source: purchased several years ago
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LibraryThing member JayHurst
Outstanding book. Every candidate for President of the United States should read.
LibraryThing member ktleyed
I am now an expert on this man. As usual, McCullough brings his subject to life - every single nook and cranny. Fascinating, behind the scenes life and observations of this plain speaking man from Missouri. Truman was much smarter than anyone realized, underappreciated when he was president and an astute politician. Very, very interesting biography and glimpse into this time period of the last part of WWII and through the Korean War. On audio this took me over a month to read!… (more)
LibraryThing member Limelite
Although Truman was an honorable man who did great work to relieve human suffering in post-WWII Europe with the Marshall Plan and made the first significant strides in civil rights for African Americans in this country by desegregating the military, through no fault of his own, he remains a dull personality even in this highly researched biography.

He was a mid-westerner with mid-western values who was an autodidact. In spite of being the last president without a college education, he was forward thinking, a term he preferred over liberal or even progressive. His driving force as a politician from the beginning of his career was to make people's lives better, and it must be said that he did at every level of his public service.

Still, I found this biography uninteresting because Truman's personality and character were fixed early in life, he never experienced what would be termed an epiphany. He arrived to young adulthood with his attitudes and values fixed and he never significantly varied from them. Yet, they served him well all his life, except as a businessman.

Honest, full of common sense, able to get people to work for him toward his goals, and blessedly without an ego that would interfere with a job getting done, he was a man who served as president at the greatest turning point in mankind's history -- the arrival of the atomic age, and he steered this country away from continued armed conflict with the Soviet Union at the end of WWII and dawn of the Cold War.

His life is a testament to the truism that great events make great men. Truman definitely was a great, and quiet, and private man. But even McCullough can not make him the least bit fascinating.
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LibraryThing member gmillar
Good ole David McCullough! He's always reliable and turns a potentially pedestrian subject into something gripping and fast-moving. I really enjoyed opening up this book each evening before I got into bed. There was something new and interesting every night. It's a big book and it took me quite awhile to get through at my "dip-in" reading rate but it is a great story well told. I like Mr Truman too.… (more)
LibraryThing member tg9522
Excellent history of Truman. Well written.
LibraryThing member bexaplex
Bizarrely readable for its thousand pages, even when McCullough is harping on how healthy Truman is. Focus never departs from the subject, even though it must have been tempting to digress into analysis of the atomic bomb, the Korean war, life after the Presidency, etc. When there is conflicting information, McCullough often quotes both sources, and indicates which seems more accurate, which makes him seem trustworthy as a biographer. Although I should admit I never once looked at the endnotes or bibliography (992 pages is quite enough!).… (more)
LibraryThing member KidQuislet
Another well done piece of literary history by author McCullough, once again documenting the life and times of an American President during a most interesting time in history (read John Adams). Truman was truly a remarkable man in a time where world events had been as tumultuous as at any time in American history. A must read for history buffs.… (more)
LibraryThing member Eskypades
When it comes to making history not only readable, but intriguing, nobody writes better than David McCullough. Many of his books chronicle people, places or events that don’t really seem to stick out as being fascinating. But once you start reading any one of McCullough’s books, you are drawn into the subject matter, compelled to read and learn about subjects that you might not otherwise ever read about. You don’t simply read a McCullough book. You experience it. My introduction to McCullough’s work was in his biography of John Adams, our country’s second president and a key figure in the founding of the nation. After finishing this, I quickly devoured 1776, The Great Bridge, and The Johnstown Flood. I would highly recommend each of these books.

Like Adams, Harry S. Truman had the misfortune of succeeding a legendary figure. While Adams presided under the shadow of George Washington, Truman had to undergo the scrutiny of an American public who had been led through many great trials by the great Franklin D. Roosevelt. Truman proved that, while he was no FDR, he was certainly his own man and very well capable of holding his own during the many conflicts of his own presidency.

In Truman, we are brought into his story well before his birth as McCullough fills us in on the details of his family heritage. We follow Truman through his childhood, his stint as a gallant officer during World War I, his romancing of and subsequent marriage to Bess Wallace, and his rise up and into the political world. McCullough does an excellent job of covering several controversial topics such as the Marshall Plan, the Korean Conflict, the Manhattan Project, McCarthyism, and the firing of Gen. Douglas MacArthur without getting bogged down in presenting his own opinions on these matters, instead letting the historical accounts speak for themselves. We are treated to the often exciting, edge-of-your-seat workings of political campaigning, including Truman’s first presidential nomination as well as his momentous and astounding defeat of Thomas Dewey.

At well over 1,000 pages, Truman is a hefty read. But being already familiar with McCullough’s style, I knew it would be a great read and I was not disappointed. Not being a historian nor familiar with this period of U.S. history, I can’t speak to the factual accuracy of the book’s events. But once again, McCullough does a masterful job of bringing the person off the written page to the point where you feel like you know the person himself. By the end of the book and upon the account of Truman’s death, I felt like I had lost a friend. Truman is an excellent biography, an inspirational story and one that will have you keeping late hours just to read one more page.
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LibraryThing member oddvark59
Very good book. Interesting reading with just enough detail.
LibraryThing member gpmartinson
Thorough fun and interesting review of the life of one of the great political leaders of our time, as well as some of the biggest tragedies of our time.
LibraryThing member HankIII
Great book; chock full of every detail, it seemed, of Truman's background and politics. Just thinking about what a huge undertaking in research and good writing it was, almost made my head explode.The only reason I didn't finish: I reached a point of plodding, and when I reach that point, I take a breather.I may very well give this one another shot one day when I have world enough and time.… (more)
LibraryThing member psocoptera
I read this quite some time ago in high school for summer reading, and I was surprised to discover how much I enjoyed it. This may lead to the conclusion that I was an unusual 16 year old, which is likely true, however, I think better case could be made for David McCullough's Truman being an extraordinarily well written biography. It is a doorstopper, but well worth the read.… (more)
LibraryThing member joyleppin
David McCullough's writing voice is like reading a personal letter. Mr. Truman had such trying times-in office and at home.
LibraryThing member watchman146
Long biography of an overlooked president. Truman was distinctly American and midwestern. Mc Collough brings that out well. The "life on the farm" parts get a little dull, however.
LibraryThing member maneekuhi
Great biography, great man. Still one of our most under-rated Presidents. Went from Senator to Vice-president to President in less than days. Two weeks after being sworn-in he was at the Potsdam Conference with Churchill and Stalin. Then he was quickly pressed for more historical decisions, most notably use of the atomic bomb, a weapon he was not privy to as VP. But he believed his job was to make decisions, and he did - and took responsibility for them. And he felt that the bomb was not his most difficult decision while President - entering the Korean War was. There are so many wonderful segments to this book - but my favorite was probably the '48 election, one that few believed he could win. The momentum buildup as he made his whistle-stops is incredible to read about. Most of all, I enjoyed the testimonials of the people who got to know Truman personally, how they had generally underestimated him, and came away truly impressed with the man from Independence, Missouri.… (more)
LibraryThing member KC9333
Loved the first half...got bogged down after World War 2. But overall a fascinating look at one of our country's exceptional leaders
LibraryThing member PlankGeek
David McCullough is a great reader and this abridgement is interesting and has been skillfully done. There were sound bites of Truman's speeches included in the audio, which provided a better understanding of Truman himself. I've visited the Truman Presidential Library and Truman's home and seen a number of documentaries, and I was still surprised by what I learned from this book.… (more)
LibraryThing member mrminjares
David McCullough rarely fails to satisfy. In this 992 page biography, he proves himself a master storyteller once again. The subject is Harry Truman, a man notorious for authorizing the first ever use of an atomic weapon but whose other contributions to history, including the Truman Doctrine, the Berlin Airlift, recognition of Israel, establishment of the CIA and the NSA, establishment of NATO, invasion of Korea, firing of General MacArthur, have shaped the course of events to this day. David McCullough humanizes Harry Truman and even more, presents him as the kind of American Thomas Jefferson idealized as befitting the presidency.

I certainly have greater respect for Harry Truman. I was particularly struck how little he sought politics. His first elected position as county administrator was offered to him by a local political boss. Harry proved so adept at administration that he rode a wave of success all the way to the United States senate. He was loyal to his party in the Senate but not widely known for any particular speeches or legislation. One exception to this was the Truman Commission, which weeded out graft and waste in government contracting during World War II. Truman was propelled to the Vice Presidency against his own wishes, largely due to the fact that Roosevelt was paying no attention to the issue and all the other more popular choices had fatal flaws. Only three months after inauguration, Roosevelt is dead and Truman finds himself suddenly responsible for ending World War II. He is admired by Churchill, and is deceived by Stalin. He somehow survives the ordeal of the Presidency, then decides to make a run for a second term despite low approval ratings. He pulls off an upset victory against Dewey at age 64 after an enormously successful "whistle stop" tour of the United States by train. His second term is dominated by the Korean War, a product of the Cold War and the fear that Russia and the Communists are advancing. The Korean War drives down Truman's popularity once again. He survives to the end of his term and is succeeded by Eisenhower, who became popular as a World War II general and actually served as Chief of Staff to Truman, who thought Eisenhower was a Democrat. Truman's popularity grows once he returns to Independence, Missouri and lives on to the age of 84 surviving not only Eisenhower but Adlai Stevenson, Dean Acheson, MacArthur and a great number of other monumental figures of the twentieth century.
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LibraryThing member gmicksmith
This is an entertaining, easy read, and an informative biography of a somewhat lackluster but critical post-War president. It is a full biography though and begins with the Truman family's origins and ends with Harry S.' death.
LibraryThing member antiquary
Generally sympathetic and for me irresistibly told, very detailed life of TRuman beginning with his ancestors moving to Missouri in the early 1800s. A wonderful sense of the pioneer virtues of his people, and his own very plain life, until he as unexpectedly taken up by Tom Prendergast and made a county judge (commissioner) and senator, from which he emerged later as vice president and president. Perhaps a bit too inclined to be kindly to the Prendergast machine --I have seen another franker version --but includes enough of the negatives to make his positive portrait fairly credible. Definitely the feel-good version --how we would like Truman to have been.… (more)
LibraryThing member olegalCA
I'm very much into biographies of American presidents at the moment - gee wonder why? This was an excellent (if long) account of the life of Harry Truman. I would've liked to see more written on his decision to use the atom bomb but other than that, it was great. Highly recommended.
LibraryThing member Carolee888
Truman is the best audio book by David McCullough that I have listened to so far. The narrator was the author. I picked this one because I really did not know very much about Truman except for his morning constitutionals and seeing the picture of him holding up the newspaper that said that Dewey had won.

Coming from the Midwest, I was impressed that he was so humble and actually self-deprecating. This may be a regional trait. I tended to be the same way until I had to learn not to be for job interviews. His world opened up for him when he first got his glasses, he share that experience with Teddy Roosevelt. Another Midwestern trait was to be a reader, he and his friend read a whole public library. That warms my heart as I did too although, I did skip all the math and business books. He had good grades and good manners and worked as a bank teller until he was called home by his father to work the family farm. I also got the message that his actions were more statesman than politician which makes me extremely happy.

What I liked best about this audio book was that actual recordings of his famous speeches were included. That made the story seem more real. Also it ended with a recording of Truman playing the Black Hawk Waltz on the piano.

I cannot form my total opinion of him yet except that he was a fine Midwesterner. I think the story stayed away from negative criticism so I plan to read more about it. So this portrayal was mostly positive.
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Winner of the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for Biography. Non-circulating

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