Faith After Doubt: Why Your Beliefs Stopped Working and What to Do About It

by Brian D. McLaren

Hardcover, 2021

Status

Available

Collection

Description

"From the author of A New Kind of Christianity comes a bold proposal: only doubt can save the world and your faith. Sixty-five million adults in the U.S. have dropped out of active church attendance and about 2.7 million more are leaving every year. Faith After Doubt is for the millions of people around the world who feel that their faith is falling apart. Using his own story and the stories of a diverse group of struggling believers, Brian D. McLaren, a former pastor and now an author, speaker, and activist shows how old assumptions are being challenged in nearly every area of human life, not just theology and spirituality. He proposes a four-stage model of faith development in which questions and doubt are not the enemy of faith, but rather a portal to a more mature and fruitful kind of faith. The four stages-Simplicity, Complexity, Perplexity, and Harmony-offer a path forward that can help sincere and thoughtful people leave behind unnecessary baggage and intensify their commitment to what matters most"--… (more)

Publication

St. Martin's Essentials (2021), 256 pages

Rating

½ (10 ratings; 3.7)

User reviews

LibraryThing member BookAnonJeff
Too Much Faith, Not Enough Doubt. I've read McLaren for a few years and knew him to be of the more "progressive Christian" bent, so I knew what I was getting myself in for in picking up this book. But as always, he does have at least a few good points in here, making the book absolutely worthy of
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reading and contemplating. However, he also proof texts a fair amount, and any at all of this particular sin is enough for me to dock *any* book that utilizes the practice a star in my own personal war with the practice. (Though I *do* note that he isn't as bad as other writers in this.) The other star removal comes from the title of this review, which is really my core criticism here. As is so often in his previous books as well as so many other authors, McLaren has good points about the need for doubt and how to live in harmony... but then insists on praising cult figures on both sides of the aisle such as Greta Thurnberg and David Grossman. In encouraging evaneglicals to doubt their beliefs, he seems rather sure of his own beliefs in the religions of science and government - seemingly more comfortable worshipping these religions than the Christ he claims. Overall, much of the discussion here truly is strong. It simply needed to be applied in far more areas than McLaren was... comfortable... in doing. Recommended.
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