The Aesop for Children

by Aesop

Hardcover, 1999

Status

Available

Collection

Publication

Barnes & Noble (1999), Hardcover, 112 pages

Description

One hundred twenty-six best-loved fables of Aesop.

Original publication date

1919

Physical description

112 p.; 11.1 inches

ISBN

1566192927 / 9781566192927

Barcode

3693

User reviews

LibraryThing member glanecia
I love the Aesop Fables. This edition is great for children, the print is large and the pictures are brilliant.
LibraryThing member keylawk
Fifty (or so) fables, with the moral of the story. Includes the Wolf & the Kid; Tortoise & the Ducks; Belling the Cat; Lion & Ass; Wolf & Lion; Lion & Gnat. The illustrations show character.
LibraryThing member tripleblessings
Classic fables about animals by Aesop, with illustrations by Milo Winter from the 1917 edition. The same book I had as a child. A good reference, though you wouldn't want to read the whole thing at one sitting. The kids like the pictures.
LibraryThing member MarieCasillas
The Aesop for Children
The Wolf and the Kid

Characters: Billy goat, wolf, and dogs
Setting: pasture
Theme: life lessons
Genre: Fable
Summary: On day a young goat named Billy goat refused to listen to his mother to follow his herd home. Soon he realizes that the sun is setting and danger could arrive. As he rushes home he runs into a wolf who is going to eat him. Billy goat begs the wolf to play on song on his pipe before he eats him. The wolf does so and the Shepherd dogs hear and run the wolf off.
Audience: Beginners and youth
Curriculum ties: Fables, listen to adults
Personal Response: This simple story holds a big message: do not let anything turn you from your purpose. It shows students that thinking quickly can change your life but at the same time listening to adults is essential in avoiding danger.
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LibraryThing member KellyLPickett
Told through very simple tales that use animals who are known for specific characteristics, Aesop teaches over a hundred lessons important truths about life. Each story is very brief and is followed by a statement telling the lesson of the story. Some of the most well known include "Country mouse and City Mouse", "Goose and the Golden Egg", "A Wolf in Sheep's Clothing", and "The Tortoise and the Hare". The lessons include "Do not let anything turn you from your purpose" and "Do not tell others how to act unless you can set a good example".
All of the lessons in this book are important to think about.
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LibraryThing member fuzzi
Beautifully illustrated, with familiar tales from my childhood, this book should have been a sure winner with me.

It wasn't.

I found myself stopping my read to see how many pages were left.

I think there were just too many morality tales too similar to one another to make this enjoyable.
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LibraryThing member DzejnCrvena
I read the other version in high school but I probably didn't finish it, so here I am trying to get "closure" with this book. Most stories here were featured in my elementary stories and I thought they were originally shared from local--Filipino--storytellers. Some stories are still unheard of, so I recommend this to kids and young at heart.
P.S. I picked it at random for my 2021 PopSugar Reading Challenge.
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LibraryThing member AbigailAdams26
Continuing my Aesop project, I recently picked up a copy of Milo Winter's classic collection, originally published in 1919. With 146 fables, and at least one color illustration per page, The Aesop for Children has long been the edition against which all others are judged. Part of the so-called "golden age" of children's illustration, Winter worked on many children's classics in the early years of the twentieth century, but it is primarily this book for which he is remembered.

The reader will encounter many old favorites here, from The Fox and the Grapes to The Hare and the Tortoise, as well as many less well-known selections. The language is charming and old-fashioned, although the effect can be disconcerting. Winter seems inordinately fond of the adjective "miry" - I lost count of the number of "miry roads" encountered in his text - and uses "ass" (meaning donkey) frequently. His moral interpretation of the fables can also feel somewhat heavy-handed and dated.

However that may be, the fables themselves are as entertaining as ever, and Winter's illustrations are the ideal complement for them. His animal depictions are simply marvelous - simultaneously realistic and emotionally expressive.
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Pages

112

Rating

(95 ratings; 4.1)
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