Frog Girl

by Paul Owen Lewis

Hardcover, 1997

Status

Available

Local notes

398.2 Lew

Collection

Publication

Beyond Words Pub Co (1997), Hardcover, 34 pages

Description

When the frogs suddenly vanish from the lake behind her village, a young Native American girl is led to the frog village underneath the lake and learns what she must do to save both the frogs and her own people.

Physical description

34 p.; 11 inches

ISBN

1885223579 / 9781885223579

Barcode

3944

User reviews

LibraryThing member netaylor
Frog Girl is a story of the human relationship with our environment. The folktale illuminates the feedback loop of cause and effect between geography and human culture. As frog girl is thrust into the underworld of the frogs, the totem of her Northwestern Indian tribe, she learns the struggles of the frog, the fragility of their environment, and how their environment also effects the human way of life. She learns the lesson of interconnectedness and how her people must interact with their environment.… (more)
LibraryThing member LanaLee123
Great book for introducing students to Native American mythology, specifically that of the Northwest Coastal cultural region. Common themes to Northwest Coast Native American mythology and also present in the book are those of separation, initiation and return.
Students can also learn to respect all forms of life, even those much smaller such as frogs.… (more)
LibraryThing member jenflock
Frog Girl is a story
of the human
relationship with
our environment.
The folktale
illuminates the
feedback loop of
cause and effect
between
geography and
human culture. As
frog girl is thrust
into the
underworld of the
frogs, the totem of
her Northwestern
Indian tribe, she
learns the
struggles of the
frog, the fragility
of their
environment, and
how their
environment also
effects the human
way of life. She
learns the lesson
of
interconnectedness
and how her
people must
interact with their
environment.
… (more)
LibraryThing member kmcgiverin05
This is a legend about a frog girl. It has been told for many years. This is appropriate for the primary grades, and I would use it when talking about Indians and about myths told by Indians. The main girl the frog girl is a round character that grows to save the frogs, giving them all another chance.
LibraryThing member TheMightyQuinn
A young girl frequents a pond near her home, she discovers that her people are just like the frog people under the pond and she saves all the frogs from a volcano eruption. Gorgeous, very detailed illustrations accurately depicting native designs and totem poles. Text is intentionally spare to preserve the oral tradition of the story and the richness a teller will add to the illustrations. Author's note adds to the authenticity and explains the parts of the cultures included in the story. Recommended for all ages and all picture book collections.… (more)
LibraryThing member dr_zirk
Frog Girl is a worthy companion to Storm Boy by the same author. The general theme of the story is similar between the two volumes, but it's really the stunning artwork that makes Paul Owen Lewis' work so worthwhile - his faithful recreation of Pacific Northwest native culture prior to the arrival of the Europeans is rich, evocative, and thoroughly rewarding.… (more)
LibraryThing member kcrous3
.This was quite possibly one of the worst children's books I have read in a long time. Not only was the story poorly laid out, but it was nearly impossible to follow and determine what happened. The books ending is abrupt, and isn't clear to the reader what happens. The author seems like they are trying to get a message through to the reader, but does a very poor job of explaining what that message is. The only part I liked in the slightest was when the little girl is taken under the lake to the world of the frogs, besides that it was all over the place and difficult to follow… (more)
LibraryThing member srogel1
I liked some parts of this book but disliked some other aspects of it. I liked the illustrations because of the extremely fine detail in the characters as well as the setting. In addition to the illustrations, I enjoyed the mystery and magic behind the story because most people wouldn’t think to write a story about how there is a whole village of frogs beneath a lake! I like the creativity behind the story as well as the cultural aspect of the Native American tribes. However, I am not quite sure that this book would get picked off of the shelf very often by students/children because of the title. When I first read “Frog Girl” I immediately thought the girl would turn into a frog or something similar to that. I just feel that the book and the title don’t seem very appealing to the naked eye of a passing reader.
Also, there are some relatable moments/themes in the story such as care for others and they will care for you, do unto other as they will do unto you, and respecting your “neighbors” and the surrounding nature. However, I do not think that most students would be able to relate to the particular situation where they help out a whole “village” of frogs. But this different scenario and story makes the reader/audience think deeply about the connection to them as well as the theme/main message the author was trying to portray.
… (more)
LibraryThing member Cheryl_in_CC_NV
Watched on YouTube. ?Seems to be an extensive author's note that the reader did not share with us.
I do recommend social studies teachers and other interested readers get this from their library or buy it.?á
(My library system does not own a copy.)
LibraryThing member SmithA45
Frog Girl is a story of a young Aboriginal girl who must save her village from a volcano. Two boys have taken all the frogs out of the lake that the girl frequents. She goes to listen to the sounds of the frogs. When she gets there, there is only one frog. This frog takes her underneath the lake to speak to Grandmother Frog, who is upset that she can't find her family. The girl tells of the boys she has seen with nets, and Grandmother becomes more upset, with smoke pouring from her hat. The girl goes home and sets the frogs free before her village is burned down from the erupting volcano. As she sets the frogs free, a heavy rain starts to fall. Her family comes back, as they had been fighting the fires started by the volcano, and the girl tells them of the frogs.

This folktale deals with the relationship between nature and human actions. The last pages include a note from the author, as well as information on the Northwest Motifs on separation, initiation, and return. I found this information quite interesting, and it explains some aspects of the story, such as Frog Woman's dual identity as Volcano Woman. Frog Girl also teaches "that all creatures are related and worthy of respect". The illustrations are deep and vivid, and the fact that the face of the Grandmother is never shown adds to the mystery. The illustrations of the girl endangering herself to save the frogs by running through the burning forest adds to the mood.
… (more)
LibraryThing member McKennaMiller
I thought that the writing and the illustrations really complimented each other in this book. I also really enjoyed the magical realism. My favorite part is when the girl lifts up the water and walks under into the magical frog world.

Pages

34

Rating

(14 ratings; 3.6)
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