Magic Tree House #9: Dolphins at Daybreak

by Mary Pope Osborne

Paperback, 1997

Status

Available

Publication

Random House Books for Young Readers (1997), Paperback, 67 pages

Description

Their magic tree house takes Jack and Annie deep into the sea, where they meet up with dolphins, sharks, and octopi as they search for the answer to an ancient riddle.

Original publication date

1997

Physical description

67 p.; 7.6 inches

ISBN

067988338X / 9780679883388

Barcode

1929

User reviews

LibraryThing member Zacswic
I loved this book because it gives me a lot of info.
LibraryThing member skeeterbo
I liked it becasue it was real animal life stuff. I liked the island that they were on. It was made out of cool skeletons, and it was very, very spiky. I What a blessing it was tehat God let me read it.
LibraryThing member cakebaker
This is a fantasy about brother and sister Jack and Annie. They travel in their tree house to a remote island near a coral reef. They use a mini sub to explore the reef and meet many ocean creatures, including two dolphins who come to the rescue when they need it. The book encourages reading and research.
LibraryThing member Miss.Barbara
Morgan le Fay will make Jack and Annie masters of the tree house if only they can solve four riddles. "Dolphins at Daybreak" begins the third set of four books in the magical series, as Jack and Annie embark upon solving riddle number three in a whole new world under the ocean!
LibraryThing member t1bclasslibrary
Morgan Le Fay is giving Jack and Annie the chance to become master librariens- if they solve riddles on their quests. Jack and Annie go on a journey to the ocean and face a broken down sub and sharks, but they solve their first riddle.
LibraryThing member maddie.albert756
You should read this book because it is a very interesting book if you like mysterious books. They have to travel to become librains and try to find the books. They have to try to get five gifts. They all ready got two and was looking for the third. They foud it but you got to read if you want to know.
LibraryThing member aliptak
Genre: Fantasy - This book is a good example of a fantasy because the things that happen in the book start out as believable but then they go into what is another world and it becomes unbelievable because they are suddenly in a submarine and there is ocean life all around them. It does have a conflict and resolution, because at the end they come across sharks and then the sub starts to fill with water, but then in the end everything is okay. The characters are all real people, but one of them can do something that is not real.

Characters: There are main characters who are well developed, we know what they are like and how they will act. Then there is a supporting character which is Morgan, she helps the main characters who are Jack and Annie to overcome their problems. Then there is the antagonist which is the sharks, even though they are not very well developed we still know they are bad and are the problem.

Art Media: Pen drawing and watercolor

Style: There is a lot of imagery used in this book because it explains vividly what they are doing with a lot of description so you feel like you are there.
… (more)
LibraryThing member szierdt
A delightful book with simple characters and adventurous plot. I especially liked how the concept of research was explored through this story as the children sought to discover the answer to the clue. Before reading this book, create a lesson using the elements in the story and see what conclusion the children come up with. Stations could be set throughout classroom with a few false leads. Children can be taught how to keep a log/observation journal. Opportunity for student led learning could be for groups to make clues for eachother. Also could conduct lesson outdoors.… (more)
LibraryThing member kflach1
The Magic Tree House series is a wonderful collection of books for young readers. I really enjoyed this book for so many reasons. The language was very descriptive, which contained several sensory details. Two examples of these types of details used in the book are “The sky was pale gray. The air felt freshly washed” and “A breeze blew through the window. Sea gulls cried. Waves lapped the shore.” Sensory details are extremely beneficial to a story because it keeps the reader interested. Also this allows the reader to picture in their minds what is occurring throughout the story. There is a large amount of dialogue provided that helps tell a story. The writing is organized into chapters. The chapters are arranged in sequential order of events happening to Annie and Jack. My favorite aspect of this story is the bond between the characters, Jack and Annie. They are both realistic and well-developed siblings, who take adventures to new places together. Jack is the restrained older brother who learns through books and writing down information. He always has a book, pencil, and notebook paper in his backpack ready to look up information and take down notes. Annie is the adventurous younger sister who learns through exploring. She is always willing to take the risks when exploring the different adventures with her older brother. Jack protects Annie and attempts to keep them both out of trouble in this adventure. I loved the black-and-white illustrations by Sal Murdocca because they are very detailed. Although this story is fictional, it still contains factual information about sea life. An example of this would be “The giant clam of the coral reef is three feet wide and weighs up to 200 pounds.” Therefore, when readers are exploring Jack and Annie’s adventure, they are also learning new information about marine animals and life in the ocean. The message that Jack and Annie learned is that dolphins are their heroes in this particular story. This is obvious when Annie says, “I guess they were the true pearl in the oyster.” The big idea is brothers and sisters can work together, solve problems together, and explore new places together.… (more)
LibraryThing member Laura_Martorana
This, like all magic tree house books is an entertaining and educational read for younger students intrigued by the mystery and adventure aspect of Jack and Annie's tales. On a more academic level, this book opens kids up to the research process and invites them to their local libraries to learn anything and everything.
LibraryThing member Germuth
I thought this was a great book. The first reason why I liked this book was because of the writing. Contained in the book were numerous instances of inner dialogue as well as dialogue between characters. An example of inner dialogue from the book was, “Having the same dream must mean something, he thought.” An example of dialogue between two characters was, “But dreams aren’t real,” said Jack. “Some dreams aren’t. But this one is,” said Annie. I liked how the author utilized both forms of dialogue in the book because it drew me into the various situations that occurred in the book, as well as made me easily understand the personalities of the characters. The second reason why I liked the book was because even though it was considered a chapter book, the book included illustrations. I liked this because it allowed me to see how the writing connected to the illustrations. I was able to see the characters’ emotions come alive through the illustrations. The main ideas from the book were cooperation and teamwork, habitats and ecosystems, and fish and marine life.… (more)
LibraryThing member eearly15
This contemporary realistic fiction teaches about sea animal adaptation. Number 9 within a series full of fantastic events, where Jack and Annie, the main characters, are constantly facing challenges as part of the magic tree house in order to become “Master Librarians”. This time, the adventure takes place under the ocean where pieces of information interestingly provided to the reader, invite them to learn about oceanography and sea life species with real facts. A wonderful story, rich in vocabulary presented in a special rhythm and riddles to solve on board of a mini submarine. The main characters discover the wonders of the sea through the encounter of dolphins, sharks and a giant octopus. Drawings made in pencil and perhaps grey water colors, provoking in the reader the sensation of swimming, and moving fully engaged with fun onomatopoeia and repetitions to emphasize main ideas. An excellent book to use for science and talk about different habitats and also use in a literacy unit, with many interesting ideas and details to explore.… (more)
LibraryThing member lmhudson
Part of the Magic Tree House series Dolphins at daybreak tells the tale of young siblings Jack and Annie as they go to there magical tree house. The magical librarian needs there help but first they must solve four riddles. This book follows them on their adventure to find the answer to the first riddle,
"Rough and gray as rock,
I'm plain as plain can be.
But hidden deep inside
There's great beauty in me.
What am I?"
… (more)
LibraryThing member shsunon
Jack and Annie have been assigned by Morgan le Fay the task of solving the riddle: Rough and gray as rock...I'm plain as can be...But hidden deep inside...There's great beauty in me...What am I? Their adventures take them to a coral reef, a ride on a leaky mini-sub, and encounters with an octopus and a hungry hammerhead shark. They are in definite danger and look for help from two friendly dolphins. This book is #9 of the Magic Tree House Series.… (more)
LibraryThing member jgiann2
The Magic Tree House series is wonderful and I really enjoyed this book in the series for so many reasons. The language was very descriptive and contained several sensory details. Two examples of sensory details used are “The sky was pale gray. The air felt freshly washed” and “A breeze blew through the window. Sea gulls cried. Waves lapped the shore.” Sensory details are beneficial to a story because it keeps the reader interested and allows them to picture in their minds what is occurring. There is a large amount of dialogue provided, which I believe helps tell a better story. The writing is well organized into paragraphs and chapters. The chapters are arranged in chronological order of events. My favorite aspects of this story are the characters. Jack and Annie are believable and well-developed siblings who adventure to exciting new places together. Jack is the precautious older brother who learns through books and writing down information. Annie is the adventurous and daring younger sister who learns through exploring. Jack protects Annie and attempts to keep them both out of trouble. I love sibling bond these two characters have with each other. The plot of this story is Jack and Annie must travel to the ocean and solve a riddle for Morgan le Fay. Suspense is created when an octopus grasps onto Jack and Annie’s mini-sub, when the ceiling of the mini-sub cracks and leaks, and when a hammerhead sharks follows the siblings through open water. Fortunately, two dolphins safely bring Jack and Annie back to land. I enjoyed the black-and-white illustrations because they were very detailed. Although this story is fictional, it still contains factual information about sea life, such as, “The giant clam of the coral reef is three feet wide and weighs up to 200 pounds.” Therefore, as readers are enjoying Jack and Annie’s adventure, they are also gaining knowledge on marine animals. The message that Jack and Annie learned is that dolphins are heroes, which is evident when Annie states, “I guess they were the true pearl in the oyster.” The big idea for readers is brothers and sisters can work together to solve problems and have adventures.… (more)

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Lexile

540L

Pages

67

Rating

(131 ratings; 3.7)
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