Magic Tree House # 22: Revolutionary War on Wednesday

by Pope Mary Osborne

Paperback, 2000

Status

Available

Local notes

PB Osb

Publication

Random House Childrens Books (2000), Edition: First Printing, Paperback

Description

Using their magic tree house, Jack and Annie travel back to the time of the American Revolution and help General George Washington during his famous crossing of the Delaware River.

Language

Original publication date

2000-09-26

Physical description

7.4 inches

ISBN

0439296994 / 9780439296991

Barcode

1942

User reviews

LibraryThing member zmalensek
Jack and Annie sense a problem so they go to there magic treehouse and go back in time to the revolutionary war!
LibraryThing member HollyBrunner
This is a great fantasy book that could be read independently along with its non-fiction companion. Great fantasy story, which appeals to many of my students. Would love to use this as a whole-class reading for a book discussion.
LibraryThing member danielleprice
This book is one of a series entitled “Magic Tree House.” The prologue tells how they found the tree house and how the children begin each journey. Each book is about the journeys the children explore. This particular book, two children, Jack and Annie, travel back in time. They end up in colonial times, during the Revolutionary War, where they meet George Washington. They are on a mission to bring back a piece of history. After their journey of following Washington, they find their piece of history and return back to the tree house.… (more)
LibraryThing member skeeterbo
I liked it because it was about the army and fighting. George Washington was the first President.
LibraryThing member Zacswic
jack and Annie go back in time when George Washington was in the Revolutionary War. George Washington wants them to stay behind but they don't. But George Washington gives Jack a letter to send to his family if he lost. I recommend this book to all the readers who are frans of Jack and Annie and like American History.
LibraryThing member Kpil13
A great text to use when teaching the Revolutionary war or events around it. Really got my students interested.
LibraryThing member t1bclasslibrary
Jack and Annie go back in time to help out with Washington's crossing of the Deleware. I liked the analysis of the "Washington Crossing the Delaware" painting in the front, but that's about it. It annoys the heck out of me when Jack and Annie are all, "We helped Washington win the war because we convinced him to fight in this battle!" No changing history! How many times do I have to say it! That's the number one rule of time travel: Washington won with or without your help, you can't save the kids on the Titanic, and I only let you get away with the saving the tiger because it's happening now, not in the past. Anyway they get a letter, which is their second item of four and head on their way after Washington kicks them out.… (more)
LibraryThing member Ms.Hungerford
One of the Magic Tree House series books by Mary Pope Osborne, these books focus on a sibling pair, Jack and Annie, who travel all over the world and through time to solve puzzles. A great way to get students interested in different places and times in history. While not completely accurate, many of the books have non fiction companions and students become invested in their own research interests.… (more)
LibraryThing member JMahoney18
I am doing my unit for QSTA 412 on the Revolutionary War and during work a student in the 3rd grade was reading this book. I think this is a great book to assign to students to read nightly because it teaches them so much about the Revolutionary War through a story line. My 3rd grader began telling me about the red coats and George Washington in detail and I found it impressive that this young student knew so much. i felt that this would be a great text to reinforce the details of the Revolutionary War.… (more)
LibraryThing member mhinderlie
Summary: In oder to help their friend save his library Annie and Jack travel through time to find "something to send". They end up meeting up with George Washington during the Revolutionary War helping him in his most important moment of crossing the Delaware River.
Genre: Historical Fiction, Fantasy
This story is an excellent example of Historical Fiction because it uses actual times in history and people from the time while also creating a story during that time. The reader can learn much about the time period through reading this story. It is also Fantasy because the main characters annie and jack only make it to that time period through time travel using their magical tree house.
Characterization: George Washington Is a flat character in this story, we do not know much about him, other than he is a general in the army. WE learn more about him through the children helping him in the story but in the end we still do not know much, we would not be able to predict his decisions, or predict his actions.
Media: sketching pencil, charcoal
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LibraryThing member jenniferatkinson
Summary:

Jack and Annie are brother and sister who have discovered a treehouse filled with books. The soon find that the treehouse is magic and any book they read can transport them to the actual place and time in the book. The treehouse is owned by a magical librarian named Morgan le Fay. Revolutionary War on Wednesday is the twenty-second book of the Magic Tree House series. On Wednesday morning, Annie wakes up Jack so they can get to the treehouse. They find a note left by Morgan, instructing them to find four special kinds of writings: 1. Something to follow 2. Something to send 3. Something to learn 4. Something to lend They had already been on the search and had found Something to follow, as they journeyed to the Civil War. Now they had to find Something to send. Jack picks up a book, that is near the note. The title of the book is The Revolutionary War. Jack says the words that will take them to the Revolutionary War "I wish we could go there", and points at the cover. Soon they find themselves in revolutionary period clothing and it is cold. In order to find what they are looking for, Jack and Annie read the book to get information. Jack takes notes as they go along: "American patriots fight for independence from Britain. British = redcoats". They see people in the distance and decide to go see if the people can assist them in their search. They discover a group of soldiers, around a campfire. They creep up to get a better look, but end up too close and are heard. They come out of hiding and find themselves face to face with patriot soldiers. Although the soldiers are nice, they inform the children that they have to leave to meet their Commander-in-Chief. The soldiers leave but Annie and Jack decide to follow them, in hopes that they will be led somewhere that can help them find what they are searching for. They run along a riverbank until they hear voices and see hundreds of soldiers. Jack reads in the book that it is Christmas of 1776 and the men are about to go on a secret mission. The Commander-in-Chief encourages his men, with the words of Thomas Paine. Soon after, Jack realizes that the Commander-in-Chief is George Washington. As Jack writes down this information, a soldier asks him what he is writing. Jack, in fear of being caught with a history book, runs off down the riverbank. He stops when a soldier yells at him and shines a lantern on him. It ends up being the captain of the troop he had talked to earlier. The Captain tells him to find Annie and go home at once, because the secret mission was dangerous and no place for children. Jack agrees to leave, but before he does the Captain asks him to take a letter to his children, but that he is only to send it if he hears that the patriots have failed. Jack realizes this is their Something to send and runs off to find Annie. Snow begins to fall and he has a hard time finding her, but he does. He finds her in George Washington's boat. He joins her to tell her that he has the item they need and they can now go home. Unfortunately, the soldiers get on board and take off. They are headed across the Delaware River with George Washington and his men. When they arrive on the far shore, George Washington sees them and instructs them that they are to return home. As the children wait to leave the soldiers are concerned about the snow and not being able to complete their mission. Annie yells out that they should continue and that they will succeed because the Hessians will not be expecting them. Hearing this, George Washington declares them seized as spies. Jack then reminds George Washington that he spoke words of encouragement to his men, and that he should follow his own advice. George Washington agrees. He thanks the children for their help, orders them back into the boat, and tells his men to march on. The children are taken back to the original shore. As soon as they land they run back to the treehouse and wish to go back home. Once they are back, they put the letter next to the first item and receive a note from Morgan: "Come back on Tuesday". They agreed and headed home, looking forward to their next adventure.

Personal Response:

I have read many of these books, to my sons. I think that Mary Pope Osborne has done a fantastic job of researching her topics and incorporating her characters into each adventure. It seems to boost students interests in topics they would not normally like, and that is a huge success for anyone.

Classroom Extensions:

Break the class up into groups to research and report on different concepts of the Revolutionary War. This can be based on groups active in the war itself, the reason the war happened, the author Thomas Paine, etc. There are many people and topics that can be researched.

Act out some of the important moments either before or during the Revolutionary War. This can be a lot of fun for the students and reinforce the lessons of our nations history.

Have the students design book covers, for this book.
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LibraryThing member parkerthompson
Summary: In this adventure Jack and Annie come face to face with George Washington and the soldiers of the Revolutionary War.

Personal Reaction:
I read this with my 5th grade class and I loved hat they are learning but at the same time so interested in what they are reading about!

Classroom Extention :
Compare aspects of war then vs. now
Write a letter of encouragement to a soldier
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LibraryThing member NatRenschen
This chapter book is part of the Magic Tree House series, and it involves historical fiction. I like it because it provides a sense of adventure and excitement, along with educational facts about the Revolutionary war. I think it could be useful to add in the classroom with kids in grades 3-6.
LibraryThing member romeo14v
Osborne did a great job in creating a way of providing factual events and history into a story for young minds. As part of the Magic Tree House series, two adventurous children by the name of Jack and Annie set out for another adventure in their time- and space-traveling tree house. The mysterious, magical librarian, Morgan le Fay, has set four new tasks for the siblings. Jack and Annie must find four special kinds of writing for Morgan's library in order to save Camelot, the ancient kingdom of King Arthur. As they go back in time, they arrive to a dark and snowy area. As they look around, they notice that they are back in colonial times after viewing General George Washington about to lead his army in a sneak attack against their enemies. But the weather is causing General Washington to doubt his decision. The two children must do their best to keep history on its track during the Revolutionary War. This is a great book that captures the child’s imagination and allows that child to see history at the making.… (more)
LibraryThing member shsunon
In REVOLUTIONARY WAR ON WEDNESDAY (Magic Tree House #22), Jack and Annie are catapulted to the period of the Revolutionary War; they have been instructed by Morgan le Fay to find a special kind of writing described as "something to send". They find themselves among the American war patriots who are crossing the Delaware on a frigid Christmas night with their Commander-in-Chief, George Washington; However, the soldiers are cold, ragged, discouraged and are losing the war. Will Jack and Annie be able to encourage the patriots to continue the fight and will they locate Morgan le Fay's request?

"The harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph". Thomas Paine
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LibraryThing member jbaile14
Summary: In this book, Jack and Annie are taken back to the Revolutionary War. They encounter George Washington and his soldiers on Christmas Eve. Washington is hesitant about leading his soldiers across the Delaware River because the weather is so bad; there is a terrible snow storm. However, even though Washington told the children not to follow, they crossed the river anyway. Jack and Annie told Washington that his attack was going to be successful and that he should pursue it, even though he was having hesitations. During their time spent with the soldiers, Jack and Annie were also able to learn how difficult it was being away at war, especially during the holidays.

Review: I thought this book was a great way to teach readers about the difficulties of war. I also thought the big idea of it was to teach the reader to never give up. At one point, Jack helped convince Washington how important it was to keep going, “even if things look impossible, you should keep going…” (59). I think the fact that Jack and Annie really pushed Washington to keep going shows the importance of not letting others give up. I think especially in a time of war, it is important to keep motivating others to keep going. This is a lesson that can be taken outside of war too because it can be put into many different parts of ones life. Overall, I thought this book was very informational and had different parts of the war that is important for people to learn about.
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LibraryThing member Rsantoyo13
Genre:_____ This is a good book that talks about the revolutionary war but it is written for children. I see it as more of an upper level because it is a chapter book, so maybe like 4th or 5th graders. The book is about how Jack and his sister Annie go back in time to the war and talk to George Washington. They need to convince Washington to keep fighting!… (more)
LibraryThing member BethWal94
In this modern fantasy, two kids are traveling through time to save Camelot. In a note that was left for them, they were told that in order to save Camelot, they had to find four special writings for their library. They were looking for the first two, something to follow and something to send. So they are in the tree house, and it brings them to the time of the revolutionary war. They decided they were going to follow the writings from Clara Barton. Next they found something to send, which was a letter written by George Washington. They decided to go home after that, but they could not leave the mission that they were on with the patriots. When something happened, Jack pulled out the letter George Washington wrote and reminded him what they were fighting for. This caused George Washington to tell Jack thank you. When they finally returned home, they got a letter from Morgan telling them to come back tuesday. Then with a woosh, they were back home, and walking inside.… (more)
LibraryThing member Annalisebradshaw
Annie and Jack travel through time in their magic tree house. On this adventure, they travel to the American Revolutionary War when George Washington leads his troops across the Delaware River to fight against British troops on Christmas. Annie and Jack are searching for something to send to make another step towards solving a riddle to help their friend, Morgan. They end up helping George Washington by encouraging him to keep moving forward for the future children of America.… (more)
LibraryThing member vbarbe1
I had mixed feelings about this book after reading it. I liked the book because the writing was engaging and it flowed. The book told the story of the patriots crossing of the Delaware River on Christmas to win the war. The author made me wonder what the end would be. I had so many questions that I wanted to keep flipping the pages to find the answers. For instance, when the children were caught on the boat, I wondered if George Washington would continue his surprise attack or call it off. I wondered if the letter that Captain Sanders wrote to his children would be mailed to them. The book was written in a way that allowed me to envision what was going on and follow along with ease. What I didn’t like about the book was that some of the characters were unbelievable. There were two children in the midst of this war. The children were roaming in and out of the troops without being noticed. The fact the children were able to stow away on a small boat that was going into battle without being noticed until they had arrived at their destination is just unrealistic. The message of this book is that when all seems to be failing, encouraging words may be all that’s needed to motivate people to keep up the fight.… (more)

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Rating

(104 ratings; 3.8)
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