Poetry for Young People: Edward Lear

by Edward Mendelson

Other authorsLaura Huliska-Beith (Illustrator)
Hardcover, 2001

Status

Available

Call number

811 Lea

Call number

811 Lea

Local notes

811 Lea

Collection

Publication

Sterling (2001), Edition: 2nd prt., Hardcover, 48 pages

Description

Utterly delightful to read aloud, and for parent and child to share, Edward Lear's humorous verses shine with irrepressible joy and rhythm. Filled with exuberantly nonsensical made-up words (like "Scroobius Pip" and "pobble"!) that tickle the funny bone, his work gives free rein to youthful imaginations. What better way to foster a love of poetry than the immediately appealing The Owl and the Pussy-Cat, with its effortless rhymes, song-like beat, and charming animal characters? Or The Quangle Wangle's Hat, which tells the tale of a creature who warmly welcomes everyone--and so makes everyone cheerful. This handsome volume of Edward Lear poems is now available in paperback - at a great price and with a bold new cover design - to bring the love of classic poetry to a broad new audience.… (more)

Language

Physical description

48 p.; 10.22 inches

ISBN

0806930772 / 9780806930770

Barcode

5232

User reviews

LibraryThing member t1bclasslibrary
Lear’s poems contain silly situations and made up words and characters. They involve clever rhymes, and occationally antiquated words, which this book explains at the bottom of each page. His poems often express the importance of being the unusual person you are.
LibraryThing member annashapiro
From the popular 'Owl And the P*ss*-Cat' to the lesser known 'Mr. and Mrs. Spikky Sparrow', to the famous limericks, Edward Lear's poetry collection is a classic. These poems are fun for youngsters to listen to, as well as fun for older kids and adults to read out loud. There are many new vocabulary words, for which this edition so thoughtfully provides definitions. One of my favorites is 'The Dong with a Luminous Nose' who wanders along through the darkness, lighting up his way. He falls in love with a Jumbly Girl (from the poem about the Jumblies who brave the sea in a sieve) and his heart breaks when they sail away.… (more)

Pages

48

Rating

(12 ratings; 3.7)
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