Henry and the Paper Route (Henry Huggins, Book 4)

by Beverly Cleary

Paperback, 2002

Status

Available

Call number

PB Cle

Call number

PB Cle

Local notes

PB Cle

Publication

Scholastic (2002), Paperback, 192 pages

Description

Henry Huggins gets carried away with his own ambitions when he longs for a paper route of his own, and gets some unexpected help from the irrespressible and inescapable ramona Quimby.

Language

Original publication date

1957

Physical description

192 p.; 7.5 inches

ISBN

0439385938 / 9780439385930

Barcode

1222

User reviews

LibraryThing member the_hag
As with the previous books, Henry and the Paper Route is written in chapter book style where each chapter is almost a short story in-and-of-itself and which all wind their way toward the ultimate goal (each book Henry has that ONE thing he's got to get or do) which makes for interesting reading, wondering how each part will ultimately work out with the end goal. It's clear from the title that this volume in the Henry Huggins series is all about Henry and his desire to get a paper route all his own and as the chapters go on, we see how he goes about proving he's ready to do that! With this book we also get to read more about Beezus and Ramona, Scooter, Ribsy and more!

Henry and the Paper Route is six chapters of boyishly good adventure geared toward Henry obtaining the paper route of his dreams! We start out with Henry in hot water over bringing home four kittens...this chapter is all about him making an interesting first impression with Mr. Capper (the newspaper guy). The second chapter is about his tireless search to find good homes for those kittens. Chapter three Henry engineers a clever plan to help his class get ahead in the school paper drive and in chapter four we find out if his plan was successful or not! Chapter five Henry meets Murph, boy genius and finds that Murph has transferred into the paper route he's had his eye on! Oh, no...in chapter six will Henry finally get that route or is he destined to only fill in and help Scooter out? Your young reader will love finding out!

I give this book five stars...though the Henry Huggins series was written in the 1940's and 50's and have a bit of a Leave It to Beaver feel with regards to the traditional family roles and quaint feel of the daily life of the kids in them...they are also rather timeless. Putting aside the money issues (yea, everything cost WAY less in these books than they do today), Henry Huggins is a clean cut typical boy looking for a bit of fun...but he's also honest, hard working, and clever in thinking of ways to get what he wants (the advertising thing for the paper drive for example)...and he's always respectful even when he's trying to scheme to get what he wants! Henry and the Paper Route (and all the other books in this series) are well worth reading...these are kids classics for a reason, because they are timelessly entertaining!
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LibraryThing member amspicer
Henry and the Paper Route is a great book for those who are in Elementary school. This short novel is a great adventure story about a boy named Henry who just can't wait to turn eleven! At the age of eleven he is able to work as the paper boy and it is his chance to prove to Mr. Capper's that he is right for the job. The interview ends up being a complete disaster which lead to Mr. Capper asking Henry to come back in a few years when he was older. Will Henry give up? How will he prove that he is capable of this job? This story is also great for whole group read alouds allowing children to make predictions as well as learn about the importance of professionalism and responsibility.… (more)
LibraryThing member nmhale
This book delivers more Henry Huggins antics. Henry is earnest, bumbling, and full of affection: he's like a little puppy. Appropriately, his book series is all about childhood life adventures with his best friend, Ribsy (a dog). The latest escapades center around his quest to earn a paper route. As much as he likes football, hanging out with Ribsy, and playing with the neighborhood kids, he feels the need for a more serious occupation. After all, he's getting older. Henry begins to pester Scooter, who is a year older than him and in the enviable position of currently being a paper boy. Scooter asks Henry to cover for him when he has other engagements, and Henry is encouraged by compliments from the paper route manager, but when he and Scooter get in a fight Henry is banished from the job. At least, banished in his own mind. Then, he and Scooter make peace, Henry turns eleven, and he thinks he has a chance to finally get his precious paper route. Until a new boy moves in, who had a route in his old neighborhood and wants to switch over to one by his new house.

While his paper boy pursuits face success and defeat, Henry has other problems that seem like colossal issues to his young mind. For instance, the four kittens he saves from a rummage sale and the paper recycling contest at his school that he is determined his class will win. Not to mention the new boy, Murph, who is making an awesome robot, but who also took the paper route Henry wanted. Luckily for Henry, Murph doesn't know how to handle Ramona. When she decides she wants to be just like the new boy - including taking over his paper route - Murph decides that he has had enough. He hands the paper route over to Henry, who finally sees his dream realized.

I always enjoy reading Cleary books. Henry is a fun protagonist, and his innocent escapades are charming. I especially like the blend of sweet and mischievous, and the immense creativity, that all of her children characters evince. This entry in the Henry Huggins series has an overarching plot that connects the many unrelated episodes, and ends on a satisfying note. Henry outsmarts Ramona, proving that he deserves the paper route. Ramona Cleary is an easy choice for parents and teachers looking for a book that employs humor, a solid narrative that children will enjoy, and well-rounded lovable characters.
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LibraryThing member bballgirl
it is really funny!
LibraryThing member Marse
This book was published in 1957 and I would have been Henry's age in 1970, yet much of the action seemed completely contemporary to my childhood.: getting a paper route, kittens being given away from a cardboard box, school paper drives! Do kids even know what a paper drive is anymore? Anyway, a very enjoyable story, wonderful, believable characters and a loving glimpse into what has become another world. A paper route was my first job at the age of 11, when my brother (who was the one who really wanted that job) turned out to be a year too young yet. He convinced me [his bookish older sister] to do it instead and I did -- and it turned out to be a total disaster, I actually LOST money on the deal, but boy, the stories I could tell about that route! I still remember my hands covered in ink from folding the papers and putting rubber bands around them. Recommended to adults for nostalgia factor, and to 8-10 year olds for the joy of reading about a neighborhood you wished you lived in.… (more)

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Pages

192

Rating

(126 ratings; 3.9)
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