Jackie & Me (Baseball Card Adventures)

by Dan Gutman

Paperback, 2000

Status

Available

Call number

PB Gut

Call number

PB Gut

Local notes

PB Gut

Publication

HarperCollins (2000), Edition: Baseball Card Adventures, 160 pages

Description

With his ability to travel through time by using baseball cards, Joe goes back to 1947 to meet Jackie Robinson, turning into a black boy in the process.

Language

Original language

English

Original publication date

1999

Physical description

160 p.; 5.13 inches

ISBN

0380800845 / 9780380800841

Barcode

2536

User reviews

LibraryThing member bostonfan
If you like sports books then you would like this book.
LibraryThing member bplma
In order to write an essay for school, 12 year old Joe Stoshak uses his baseball card collection to travel back to 1947 to meet Jackie Robinson and learns to understand better the racsim Robinson faced as the first African American in major league baseball; Stoshak, who is white, arrives in 1947 as a young black boy. Not great literature, formulaic and predictable, part of Gutman's baseball card series books.(See Honus, Babe, etc.) Young baseball fans LOVE them. Good for sports fans.… (more)
LibraryThing member mrsarey
When Joe Stoshack goes back to 1947, he thinks he's only going to learn about Jackie Robinson for a report. Instead, he learns what it was like to be black before desegregation. This is a great book.
LibraryThing member asomers
I had never read any of the Baseball Card series books before. This one is part of our Battle of the Books challenge for this year. This is a great story for any student that loves history and/or baseball. It provides a very realistic portrayal of the racial biases of the period.
LibraryThing member Othemts
This is the second book in the Baseball Card Adventure in which Joe Stoshack uses his power to travel through time using baseball cards to meet Jackie Robinson. As an added wrinkle to the story, he initially arrives in 1947 as an African American boy and directly experiences the racial animus of New York at that time. I felt that Jackie Robinson's character in this novel was one-dimensional, too much of a heroic martyr, although the book does offer some nice glimpses of his family life. Meanwhile, it seems too flippant that Stosh is traveling to meet Robinson merely to write a Black History Month report for his school, and spends much of the novel trying to gather rare baseball cards to bring to the future. The lesson of the book is how to stand up to bullies without resorting to anger, which Stosh applies in his own youth baseball games, but seems to miss out on the heart of the Jackie Robinson story in the process.… (more)
LibraryThing member Phill242
Joe Stochak can travel back in time via baseball trading cards. In this one, Joe travels back in time to see Jackie Robinson break the color barrier. In doing so, Joe learns about controlling anger against bullies.
LibraryThing member bp0128bd
Joe Stochak can travel back in time via baseball trading cards. In this one, Joe travels back in time to see Jackie Robinson break the color barrier. In doing so, Joe learns about controlling anger against bullies.

Pages

160

Rating

(58 ratings; 4)
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