The Boxcar Children #2: Surprise Island

by Gertrude Chandler Warner

Other authorsMary Gehr (Illustrator)
Paperback, 1989

Status

Available

Local notes

PB War (c.1)

Publication

INDPB (1989), Edition: Reprint, 192 pages

Description

The children are spending the summer on their own private island but there is a mysterious stranger on the island.

Language

Original language

English

Original publication date

1949

Physical description

192 p.; 5.25 inches

ISBN

0807576743 / 9780807576748

Barcode

2606

User reviews

LibraryThing member ElizaJane
Reason for Reading: This is another book from the Random Bookshelf that I am reading from this year.The Boxcar Children have played a big part in my and my children's lives. I intend to acquire a complete set of the first 19 books (the others hold no interest to me) and keep them as keepers on my juvenile shelves for my future grandchildren.

Book 2 is very similar to that of the first in the series. First of all, there is no real mystery except for the hidden identity of a man on the island known only to them as "Joe". However, the fisherman who lives on the island knows who he really is and tells the Dr., though swears him to secrecy. The children continuously suspect Joe of being more than just a handyman and wonder who he really is. The story itself is adorable and brings back the children surviving on their own as Grandfather owns a small island where he has decided to let the children stay for the duration of the summer holidays. They, of course, are excited as it brings back their boxcar days and they get right to fixing up the barn as a summer home and cooking, mending and fixing for themselves. A quaint story with no antagonists but simply an innocent tale of childhood from the days of yesteryear. Kids today will get a big kick out of the children being able to live on an island all by themselves for the summer. The resolution is fun and should add another character to the series in the following volumes. Mary Gehr's line & ink drawings are typical of the era and lovingly match the text. An enjoyable, wholesome story for both boys and girls.
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LibraryThing member SABC
Thinking of staying on an island for the summer.....Read about the Alden children and their adventures during one summers vacation.
LibraryThing member agrudzien
In this second book, the four Alden children are spending the summer on an island. Able to make their "home" in an old barn, they spend their days cooking, cleaning, and exploring the island. The children run into one surprise after another: the first being a mysterious man who knows so much about the animals and plants on the island he can't just be a handyman; the second being a bone that appears to be human!

More of a mystery than the first one...I like how she kept the independence of the children even after they found their grandfather and moved in with him. My 3rd grade mystery group liked the balance of mystery and adventure a lot!
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LibraryThing member stipe168
like watching full house, nothing happens but you keep watching.
LibraryThing member ASBiskey
This is a good book for kids needing encouragement to read. It is simply written with a predictable plot and cheerful characters. There is enough suspence to keep a reader motivated, and the whole premise of kids being allowed to stay by themselves on a island for the summer will appeal to kids. Nothing deep or difficult, just a leisurely pleasant read for those beginning on chapter books.… (more)
LibraryThing member PiperSchaapveld
4 children take a trip to a private island and have a surprise visitor. They adventure to find out who this person is.
This is a mysterious and adventurous book for students to expand their range of imagination.
I would give this series to 3rd to 5th graders.
LibraryThing member eeminxs
Full of adventure and fun times, the reader gets a glimpse into the past of how things may have been. A true classic that is wonderful reading for all ages.
LibraryThing member jhawn
Henry, Jessie, Violet, and Benny used to live alone in a boxcar. Now they have a home with their grandfather and are spending the summer on their own private island. There's a mysterious stranger on the island who must keep his identity a secret.
LibraryThing member lissabeth21
I liked this even better than the first one. There were a few great surprises plus my son and I had important conversations based on what we read. They aren't called "Indians" anymore and a he is old enough to understand why. And it was great to read about a kid his age, Benny, having an inappropriate temper tantrum just like he still does occasionally; reading the family's negative reactions to this event was a nice insight for my son. Great time and he's looking forward to #3.… (more)
LibraryThing member efried5
1. In my opinion, “The Boxcar Children: Surprise Island” by Gertrude Chandler Warner was a mediocre book. This book is written in third person and the writing flows and is clearly organized. The book is filled with dialogue and this book could be classified as a transitional book, as it is a chapter book, yet it still has pictures to maintain young readers’ interest and provide extra support for their comprehension. The main reason I did not like this book was because I felt that the plot lacked suspense and tension. The children in the story are free to explore their grandfather’s small island throughout the summer and they frequently use their imagination throughout their adventures. However, these adventures primarily consist of the children creating their own museum, which contained seashells and a “piece of skeleton” that they found on the island, or they consisted of the children journaling the types of plants that they found on the island. The only mystery that was revealed at the end of the story, was that their new friend Joe was in fact their cousin. Because I do not feel that this story adequately pushes readers to develop problem solving and comprehension skills, I would not choose to have this book in my classroom. The main message of this book is for one to enjoy and explore his or her surroundings, without adult supervision and to take pleasure in using one’s imagination.… (more)
LibraryThing member CherieDooryard
My kids enjoyed this one almost as much as the first one. Full of gentle adventures and mild mysteries, these read like Nancy Drew light. The only thing to be aware of is that, due to the time period they are from, there is a lot of boy-girl activity delineations. Thankfully, all contributions, no matter which gender is performing them, are presented as important, which makes that easier to take.… (more)

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Lexile

530L

Pages

192

Rating

(154 ratings; 3.7)
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