The Wright Brothers: How They Invented the Airplane

by Russell Freedman

Paperback, 1993

Status

Available

Local notes

921 Wri

Collection

Publication

Scholastic (1993), 129 pages

Description

Follows the lives of the Wright brothers and describes how they developed the first airplane.

Language

Original publication date

1991

Physical description

129 p.; 9.9 inches

ISBN

0590464248 / 9780590464246

Barcode

6318

Media reviews

[Starred Review.] Using illuminating facts and incidents to place the story of this monumental achievement in the history of aeronautics and in the brothers' personal lives, Freedman focuses on the events that led to the first successful flight and on the Wrights' subsequent improvements on their invention. Diagrams and lucid explanations of the principles of flying make the years of tinkering, experimenting, reasoning, and problem-solving even more fascinating. ... Like Lincoln (Newbery Medal, 1988), this is familiar but retold in a manner so fresh and immediate that reading it is like discovering the material for the first time. (Nonfiction. 9+)
1 more
Newbery winner Freedman (Lincoln: A Photobiography) has again produced a vivid, superior biography. ... he makes ample, effective use of the many astonishing photos taken by the brothers in order to better document their experiments. Youngsters cannot fail to come away with a heightened understanding of the Wrights' dedication to manned flight and to the painstakingly slow process of invention. Ages 10-up.

User reviews

LibraryThing member kefoley
This is a wonderful information book about the Wright Brothers and how they invented the airplane. It has wonderful pictures about the process of the airplane they made and flew. It also has pictures of the Wright Brothers.
LibraryThing member electrascaife
A good way to get kids uninterested in an interesting subject. I mean, honestly, how can a book about the invention of the airplane be this dull? Yoicks.

Pages

129

Rating

(24 ratings; 3.9)
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