Hiawatha and the Peacemaker

by Robbie Robertson

Other authorsDavid Shannon (Illustrator)
Hardcover, 2015

Status

Available

Local notes

398.2 Rob

Collection

Publication

Abrams Books for Young Readers (2015), Edition: Har/Com, 48 pages

Description

Hiawatha, a Mohawk, is plotting revenge for the murder of his wife and daughters by the evil Onondaga Chief, Tadodaho, when he meets the Great Peacemaker, who enlists his help in bringing the nations together to share his vision of a new way of life marked by peace, love, and unity rather than war, hate, and fear. Includes historical notes.

Language

Original language

English

Original publication date

2015

Physical description

48 p.; 9.5 inches

ISBN

9781419712203

Barcode

6595

User reviews

LibraryThing member Jessie_Bear
After losing everything to war, Hiawatha assists the Peacemaker in delivering a message of peace and forgiveness to neighboring tribes and through his journey finds his own peace. Told from a first person perspective, Hiawatha’s tale reads aloud well and is heightened by the “together we paddled/rode/traveled” refrain in large letters, visually magnifying the progress of the story. Dark and fire-toned illustrations highlight war and anger themed passages and make way for a lighter palette when the Peacemaker is heard. Robertson’s text pairs well with Shannon’s oil paintings to deliver a complex and beautiful folk tale to a new generation. The message of peace, forgiveness, and unity applies today as much as it ever has, and is very much needed. The book includes a CD featuring an original song by Robertson, enclosed in a vinyl envelope on the rear endpaper. Perfect for classroom use, especially in the context of folk tales and Native American history or culture, Hiawatha and the Peacemaker is very highly recommended for ages six through ten.… (more)
LibraryThing member paula-childrenslib
Hiawatha, a Mohawk, is plotting revenge for the murder of his wife and daughters by the evil Onondaga Chief, Tadodaho, when he meets the Great Peacemaker, who enlists his help in bringing the nations together to share his vision of a new way of life marked by peace, love, and unity rather than war, hate, and fear. Includes historical notes.… (more)
LibraryThing member MaowangVater
Robertson tells in the text and sings on the accompanying recording the tale of Hiawatha (not to be confused with the fictional character of the same name in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s epic poem The Song of Hiawatha) the historical Mohawk warrior who became the spokesman for the Peacemaker, Deganawida. Together they put an end to intertribal warfare in the northeastern American continent, and were driving forces in the formation of The Five Nations (and later the Six Nations), the Haudenosaunee, the People of the Long House, the Iroquois Confederacy, whose governing council greatly influenced several framers of the United States Constitution, particularly Franklin, Hancock, and Jefferson.

In his acknowledgements and author’s notes Robertson thanks his son Sebastian and Six Nation leaders and authors for their historical research on the subject, but notes the inspiration for the song, and then the book came from his experience of hearing the story as a nine-year-old told by a revered elder in a native tongue in a long house on the Six Nations of the Grand River reserve in Ontario.

The text of the book and Shannon’s bold colors and line bring forth the drama of the story: a powerful struggle between among people, as the spiritual and psychological forces of fear, hatred, revenge and war are manifested in individuals, and then exorcised and transformed into a powerful force of peace and righteousness.
… (more)
LibraryThing member MeditationesMartini
I really loved this story--sometimes kids' books like this that are in that funny historical-mythic realm get filed under "original content by," and other times as retellings of myth, but the story of Hiawatha and the Peacemaker and how they united the nations and healed the evil Tadodaho found its way immediately into my heart as felt history, regardless of the (somewhat obscure) facts. History, but also a story about pain and forgiveness and new beginnings. Good one.… (more)

Pages

48

Rating

(18 ratings; 3.9)
Page: 0.3241 seconds