Dude, Where's My Country?

by Michael Moore

Hardcover, 2003

Call number

320.01

Collection

Publication

Warner Books (2003), Edition: First Edition, 272 pages

Description

This follow-up book to Michael Moore's successful 'Stupid White Men' is timed to coincide with the run-up to the 2004 US presidential election.

Media reviews

I keep thinking of people that I'd like to give a copy of this book to. I'm not saying that I agree with everything Michael Moore says, but how nice to have someone easy to read, articulate and FUNNY to express the many of the things that Carl and I have been saying for the past couple of years. Yes, I realize that the current United States political scene is so polarized -- and especially with only weeks to go before the election -- that I'll probably have all kinds of people unsubscribe from the MostlyFiction.com newsletter before they even get to the end of this paragraph.
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The objection that commentators of the right make about Michael Moore is, generally, that his arguments are facile. To be perfectly honest, I had suspected this myself, and moreover found the title "Stupid White Men" - and, for that matter, "Dude, Where's My Country?" - to be controversialist purely for the sake of attracting young, impressionable readers. Plus there was the fact that, from what I gathered, his written works seemed very much to be preaching to the choir. One does not have to work very hard at all to make me see that George W Bush is not a legitimately elected president - the basic theme of Stupid White Men.
Can the left communicate to a wide popular audience? Can it free itself of the prison of jargon? Can it reach out to the unconverted? New Labour and its co-thinkers in the Democratic party decided the only answer was to stop being on the left. Michael Moore has chosen the opposite route, and proved that it can work. His Stupid White Men sold 600,000 in the UK and several million in the US, which, he dryly recounts in his new book, qualified him for Bush's infamous tax cut. He helpfully provides a copy of the federal tax form for refunds of $1 million or more, and promises his benefactor, George W, that he'll "spend it all to get rid of you".
Gone are the days when the British broadcaster Gilbert Harding could safely satirise the asinine question on the United States visa card that asks whether the visitor intends to overthrow the government of the republic. “Sole purpose of visit,” was Harding’s merry reply. The same answer today might earn the joker a one-way ticket to Guantanamo Bay.

User reviews

LibraryThing member jmcilree
Boring, incoherent, inconsistent, illogical, venomous and not very funny.
LibraryThing member Chilperic1
His next book on from STUPID WHITE MEN, this book deals much with the Iraq War. Once again, we see a return to his ranting writing style, except this time, any intelligent prose has been eliminated in favour of jumping on the Iraq bandwagon. He also decides that the Coalition of the willing isnt willing because although many major countries joined, some countries didnt! Shock! Horror!

All in all, this is difficult to read without an extreme effort on the part of the reader. Be prepared to be faced with narrowminded writing.
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LibraryThing member madamejeanie
You know, I liked what this book had to say, but I didn't really like how MM
said it. Somebody somewhere has apparently told him he's a comedian and
he's not, but he 'thinks' he is. I could have done without the chapter
where he thought he was writing as God, for instance, and the one that was
supposed to be an interview between his 100 year old self and a yet to be
born great granddaughter.... Poorly done, very unfunny, and unfortunate, I
think, because, like Bowling for Columbine, MM has some very important
things to say in this book concerning America, 9-11, why we are really in
Iraq, etc. I wish the talking heads on TV would ask the hard questions that
he asks in this book, and stir the whole country up. But, alas, with the
inflammatory picture on the front of the book (the statue of Saddam being
torn down, only this one has George Bush's face on it, with a leering and
laughing Michael Moore just below it) a lot of people won't pick this up and
give it a chance. Middle America, those soccer Moms and Nascar Dads who
will determine the outcome of the next election and who change their minds
politically with the regularity of the four winds, those are the folks who
need to read this book. No, they just need to know the truth that is
contained inside this book, the truth that the news media is not talking
about. But they won't get it and this book will be dismissed as left wing
buffonnery. And that's sad.

For content, this book is a 5. But for delivery, I'd have to give it a 2.
He could have done so much better than this.
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LibraryThing member DSD
An interesting read on what's really going on in moden day America from a political stand point.
LibraryThing member vicarofdibley
questions for all those who voted for the most dangerous terrorist in the world. Classic Moore
LibraryThing member mobilemavericks
I was spurred to read this book by Moore because I wanted to learn the thoughts of the man who aimed to overthrow President Bush. Keep it up Michael, all of our government leaders need critical scrutiny of their motives and actions, regardless of the times (post September 11th) or their party affiliation.
LibraryThing member fpagan
Not Chomsky-like erudition, but great street-level detailing -- sometimes funny and sometimes scary -- of the collective insanity fomented and exploited by the likes of the bozo who "slithered into the White House on tracks greased by his daddy's oil buddies." Yet he somehow sees hope.
LibraryThing member bibliophile26
I’m wondering if Fahrenheit 9/11 is a reiteration of this book, which is a tirade against George W. Bush. Moore over dramatizes the point and presents (some) opinions as facts. If I was on the fence, I’m not sure if this book would push me over to the liberal side.
LibraryThing member johnthefireman
Although there may be some exaggeration and a lack of rigour, this is a refreshing book challenging the US establishment. Its loudness and brashness may seem a little over the top to those of us not from the USA, but maybe that's the most effective way of getting the message across in that particularly loud and brash country. And it reinforces for the rest of us the fact that not all US citizens conform to the widespread stereotypes of that nation.… (more)
LibraryThing member kikianika
Sometimes you need to get away from your usual reading. Step away from the fluff. Look at real issues. This was my dose-of-reality book. It's still humorous, but in a different way. And I am moderately interested in politics if they don't involve killing people.
LibraryThing member surreality
A provocative and at times highly polemic book that brings up a number of questionable details connected to the war on Iraq, the Bush government and US internal affairs. A problem is that many of these issues appear a little dated by now. Also, at times it is difficult to comprehend the importance of internal affairs from a foreigner's perspective. Not quite the impact of Stupid White Men but an engaging and thought-provoking read nonetheless.… (more)
LibraryThing member TheTwoDs
This is one of those books that you either love or hate, depending on if you agree with its politics or not. Seeing how I gave it 5 stars, you can easily tell where my political affiliations lie.
LibraryThing member Carlie
Once again I have read a Moore book too late. His calls to stop the re-election of George W. are a moot point now in 2006, after Bush has already been re-elected. The author does, however, have some interesting things to say. Many points are a reiterated version of his movie, Fahrenheit 911. He makes some excellent points about why Bush and his cronies are bad for the country and offers some advice about how to take the country back. He is funny and insightful - he calls to nominate Oprah and Wesley Clark for president.

He uses extensive notes and sources to back up his claims, having done his homework and research (at least on his side of the issue). He offers sage advice - regardless of whether people will actually take it - about terrorism and politics. He desires for Americans to stop whining and do something to make a difference for the country.
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LibraryThing member Djupstrom
If you like Michael Moore, you will enjoy this book. I think it is political humor at his best.
LibraryThing member carterchristian1
Typical Michael Moore. Of course he hates Bush and takes the side of the worker in a quick rundown of Post 9/11. A fun read if this is your kind of stuff.
LibraryThing member Sally-AnneLambert
My reaction to this is, nobody's perfect, and I think unless we honor the Native Americans properly, there's going to be no final joy to American leadership. There have been improvements, but the language is an important key. But I'm off the book's theme, the reason being - how can one respond to the utter dishonesty that is right in front of people! It seems there is a deep need for America to stay free of welfare systems... but they are there, and where they are there, are they working? And now they are probably growing. But, quel surprise, it's more than offset by welfare contributions to the rich HAHAH!! So my off-topic reaction is fuelled by, where's the balance??!! It just goes to show the Germanic and Arabic race are finally rediscovering their lost link!! Through Bush and oil. Roll out wind power, solar and...?? anything clean without a downside??… (more)
LibraryThing member kikilon
Sometimes you need to get away from your usual reading. Step away from the fluff. Look at real issues. This was my dose-of-reality book. It's still humorous, but in a different way. And I am moderately interested in politics if they don't involve killing people.
LibraryThing member wyvernfriend
Interesting, provocative and quick reading
LibraryThing member deckla
This was written in 2003 on the eve of the 2004 election, to try to elect a president better for the country than W. Alas, we had to suffer Bush for 4 more years. Michael Moore is funny, self-righteous, a social liberal and a patriot, which I am not. He goes to great lengths to prove his contentions--the sources & notes are pages 219-246. Oh how sad it is that now we look upon the Bush years as good times. He may have been a war-monger, and made some very bad decisions, but at least he wasn't corrupt. But maybe those decisions in the Bush years led us to this despicable frightening abysmal horrifying shameful Trumpian moment.… (more)
LibraryThing member AliceAnna
Good book, especially the chapter by God.
LibraryThing member emhromp2
This was an interesting read. I think, while reading the book, it is important to realise that Michael Moore thinks in black and white. But still, he has some good points. I liked his prediction that Hillary should run for president.
The book gave me a good insight in how American politics and businesses work, and it made me more wary of Western countries being as corrupt as others. It also made me feel powerless.… (more)
LibraryThing member mjmorrison1971
His 2003 follow-up to 'Stupid White Men'. Less angry and more reflective - as a result more interesting.

A very interesting reading in the closing stages of the 2008 US election.
LibraryThing member GeorgeBarr
Michael Moore writes about everything that is wrong with America according to him. As with most of his books, 33% fact 33% fiction, and 34% exploitation.
LibraryThing member rakerman
Rather unfortunately-named.

I say that because the book is really good, and smart, despite its lightweight jokey title.

In fact I much preferred the book to what is essentially its "companion movie", F911.
The book presents a much stronger case, and has better coverage of the issues.
It goes far beyond the material and topics that F911 addresses.
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Pages

272

ISBN

0446532231 / 9780446532235
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