Snow in August

by Pete Hamill

Hardcover, 1997

Status

Available

Call number

F HAM

Genres

Collection

Publication

Little Brown & Co (T) (1997), Edition: 1st, Hardcover, 327 pages

Description

"After nearly being killed by both a hired hit man and her former secretary, Agatha Raisin could use some low-key cases. So when Robert Smedley walks through the door, determined to prove that his wife is cheating, Raisin Investigations immediately offers to help. Trouble is, Agatha hates divorce cases - especially when the client is as pompous as Smedley - but she has a business to run and she's not about to turn away a paying customer. Unfortunately for Agatha, Mabel Smedley appears to be the perfect wife - young and pretty and a regular volunteer at church." "Although Smedley's case doesn't look promising, Agatha's attentions are diverted when she stumbles across the body of missing teenager Jessica Bradley. In a sudden gesture of kindness (and good public relations), Agatha offers to investigate Jessica's death free of charge."."Agatha's two biggest cases are turned upside down when Robert Smedley is poisoned. The prime suspect, his sainted wife, Mabel, immediately hires Agatha to find the real killer." "With the help of her old friend Sir Charles Fraith and some newly hired staff, Agatha Raisin sets off on another crime-solving adventure in the English Cotswolds."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

Barcode

2760

Language

User reviews

LibraryThing member TakeItOrLeaveIt
my grandmother had me read this book as it is one of her all-time favs. it was pretty great as much as I started of not liking it, I grew to love it.
LibraryThing member nbsp
Hard luck life in Hell's Kitchen has been done so many times that it's hard to make it special.
LibraryThing member LCBrooks
Snow in August is a coming of age story set in Brooklyn during the mid-1940s. Pete Hamill uses comic books, baseball, and mysticism to illuminate the harsh anti-Semetic intolerence of a predominately Irish Catholic parish. Young Michael Devlin, an alterboy at the local cathedral, and Rabbi Hirsch form a friendship that ignores the generational, religious, and ethnic barriers between them. They use the study of Yiddish, English, and baseball to support their mystical connection.… (more)
LibraryThing member suzanne5002
What a great book!! A 12yo boy lives with his mom & is an altar boy. On his way to church on day, he hears a person yelling something. The boy goes to see if there is a problem & the rabbi tells him that since this is the Sabbath, he isn't able to turn on the light. You can't work on the Sabbath. He turns on the light for him & during the next months, he befriends the rabbi. He continues to do this selfless act for many months. They befriend each other & the boy teaches him English while the rabbi teaches him Hebrew. The rabbi also tells him stories of his younger days in Prague & what happened to his wife.
The boy has 2 best friends but he learned who his best friends REALLY are when tragedy strikes.
This is the first book that I've read by Mr. Hammill. I wouldn't mind reading another by him.
… (more)
LibraryThing member carycox
A young adolescent Irish-Catholic boy in post WWII Brooklyn learns about injustice, racism and the power of belief when he befriends a neighborhood rabbi. Michael Devlin teaches Rabbi Hirsch English and baseball, while he learns Yiddish and the rich stories of the Jewish tradition.
When a gang of hoods terrorizes the neighborhood, Michael has to stand up to them--but not alone. The surprising ending is rousing and more than a little magic.… (more)
LibraryThing member taanderson
Love, love, love this book! The friendship that develops between the Irish-American 12 year old boy and the Rabbi is heart warming. With Hamill description of places and events, I truly could see them. This has laughter, tears, drama, and magic. A movie I can see of this book.
LibraryThing member Dmtcer
I found this book to be a delight! The main protagonist, Michael Devlin, is a young boy growing up in post WWII Brooklyn. He loves baseball and superheroes, but one day his world is changed forever when he befriends a Rabbi. He discovers that superheroes are not always there to save the day, and sometimes it is necessary to look to a higher power. The book is full of racial and religious tensions, and the clash of different memebers of different cultures and how just the smallest things can affect our lives. Sometimes doing the right thing is not what we grew up believing in.… (more)
LibraryThing member ctait17
Read it once before, very intesting story of boyhood in WWII in NYC and Jewish life at that time - some over the top stuff, but very good
LibraryThing member JBourke56
One of my favorites!
LibraryThing member presto
1947, Michael Devlin is eleven years old, an American-Irish boy who lives with his war-widowed mother in Brooklyn, he takes is role as alter bot seriously, but the day he braves a snow storm to fulfil his duties is the day everything changes. While on his way out of the storm a voice pleads for his help, Rabbis Judah Hirsch needs his help. That is just the beginning of what becomes a remarkable friendship and a untied bond against a gang of young thugs who are in the unfortunate habit of beating up people.

The friendship between Michael and the Rabbis is beautifully related, as they seal an agreement for Michael to teach the Czechoslovakian Rabbis English and the mysteries of baseball while in return he receives instruction in Yiddish. Michael learns a lot more besides, including much of the history of the Jews in Prague, and becomes an avid student lapping up all he is taught, something which he extends to his school work.

Michael is a delightful boy, a good kid with an insatiable appetite for learning, true to his ideals. Snow in August is a charming story, at times funny, full of hope and the power of faith and of good over evil; it is also a story of what some might call magic, yet believers a miracle.
… (more)
LibraryThing member sbsolter
Snow in August, by Pete Hamill, takes place in Brooklyn in 1947 and is a coming-of-age story about a Catholic boy who becomes friends with a Rabbi refugee from Prague. The writing is vivid and I felt transported to the time and place. There was a strong sense of nostalgia and it gave me a sense of yearning for Prague, Brooklyn, and baseball. Two major themes in the story are racism/anti-semitism and Jewish mysticism, the Kabbalah. The racism aspect was powerfully done, although the links between the racism against black baseball player Jackie Robinson and the anti-semitism of both the Nazis and a gang in Brooklyn were not particularly subtle. The mysticism aspect was very subtle until the ending; the ending was predictable and it bothered me that the mystical parts of the story came somewhat all-of-sudden rather than gradually though-out the novel.… (more)
LibraryThing member TheExOne
A book to read again. Truly magical. Important issues. Loved it!
LibraryThing member Dmtcer
I found this book to be a delight! The main protagonist, Michael Devlin, is a young boy growing up in post WWII Brooklyn. He loves baseball and superheroes, but one day his world is changed forever when he befriends a Rabbi. He discovers that superheroes are not always there to save the day, and sometimes it is necessary to look to a higher power. The book is full of racial and religious tensions, and the clash of different memebers of different cultures and how just the smallest things can affect our lives. Sometimes doing the right thing is not what we grew up believing in.… (more)
LibraryThing member sandra.k.heinzman
Wow, what a good book club pick this was. Can't wait to discuss it.
LibraryThing member sandra.k.heinzman
Wow, what a good book club pick this was. Can't wait to discuss it.
LibraryThing member sandra.k.heinzman
Wow, what a good book club pick this was. Can't wait to discuss it.
LibraryThing member sandra.k.heinzman
Wow, what a good book club pick this was. Can't wait to discuss it.
LibraryThing member sandra.k.heinzman
Wow, what a good book club pick this was. Can't wait to discuss it.
LibraryThing member OzzieJello
After reading Hamill's book "Forever," I wanted to read more of his books. "Snow in August" is a lovely story that takes the reader to post-WWII Brooklyn and explores the themes of childhood, prejudice, religion, cultures, sports, friendship and mysticism. I thoroughly enjoyed the book and will be reading a lot more of Hamill's books going forward.… (more)
LibraryThing member mrgan
What do you rate a book that proceeds in a realistic, extremely affable way for hundreds of pages, only to tie up a plot saturated with grief, loss, and lack of justice with a literal deus ex machina that resolves everything magically? I'm going to go with a 3, though it pains me. The overall work is still educational and remarkably readable, but there's no denying the feeling of being straight-up cheated when all the metaphorical magic hinted at for 90% of the book becomes bafflingly literal, to no clear narrative or symbolic purpose.… (more)
LibraryThing member sandra.k.heinzman
Wow, what a good book club pick this was. Can't wait to discuss it.
LibraryThing member YAbookfest
Michael, an alter boy, forms an unusual friendship with a poor rabbi. Michael witnessed the brutal beating of a Jewish shopkeeper and is caught in a moral dilemma. It is against his mother's and his friends' ethics to rat on Frankie and his gang of toughs. But they are terrorizing and brutalizing more and more people. With the rabbi's help, he turns to mysticism for a solution.

There are many side-stories about Jewish history, Jackie Robinson, and life in New York... sometimes you wonder where they are going but it all fits together in the end.
… (more)
LibraryThing member VashonJim
Great depictions of NewYork City, but the story moved slowly. Young boy befriends a rabbi.
LibraryThing member christinejoseph
Irish Catholic Boy + freindship elderly Rabbi — 1940 Brooklyn neighborhood — things, music, Marvel comics — Jackie Robinson — ending disappointing — too mystical

Set in a working-class Brooklyn neighborhood in 1947, this poignant tale revolves around two of the most endearing characters in recent fiction: an 11-year-old Irish Catholic boy named Michael Devlin and Rabbi Judah Hirsch, a refugee from Prague.… (more)
LibraryThing member sandra.k.heinzman
Wow, what a good book club pick this was. Can't wait to discuss it.

ISBN

0316340944 / 9780316340946
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