Cranberry Thanksgiving

by Wende Devlin

Hardcover, 1971

Status

Available

Call number

394.2

Collection

Publication

Parents Magazine Press (1971), 33 pages

Description

Grandmother almost loses her secret recipe for cranberry bread to one of the guests she and Maggie invite for Thanksgiving dinner. Includes the secret recipe.

User reviews

LibraryThing member DaytonGamble
I remember this book from when I was little because it was always read to me during thanksgiving. It sort of a hard read for a child, but is a great book to have to read to children one on one.
LibraryThing member acwheeler
Good Thanksgiving book about Cranberry Families. Talks about Thanksgiving holiday and what it mean. Very cute book!
LibraryThing member patsila
This is one of my favorite Cranberry books. I love how it's theme of never-judge-a-book by it's cover, as well as the lesson of forgiveness at the end.
And who doesn't love old Mr. Whiskers? He's a wonder! :)
LibraryThing member paroof
A favorite from my childhood that my 7 year old also enjoys. I always loved Mr. Whiskers.
LibraryThing member TheCuriousCottage
Cranberry Thanksgiving is used in the Five In A Row homeschooling curriculum. We already had Old Black Witch! by the Devlins, and started reading the Cranberry series with this book, when our oldest was only 5yo.
LibraryThing member nieva21
Every thanksgiving growing up I read this book and baked the bread, but this term reading this book took on a special meaning for me with the way of dissecting children's literature. I realized why I liked this book and wanted to re-read it, particularly it's way of teaching children about
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make-shift families and sticking together during the holidays. I feel this book is a written straight from the heart and you can feel the warmth from the lessons as well as the fact that it's still popular about thanksgiving. Thanksgiving is a very enjoyable holiday that is important for children to learn how to be thankful for what they have; this book works on the lesson of less is more and being proud of who you are, which all children should take to heart.
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LibraryThing member engpunk77
Visiting step-grandchildren over Thanksgiving weekend, one adored 9-year-old recommended this, saying it's one of her favorites. I read it aloud to her and the 6-year-old while their older brother played hockey, and I loved it. A good memory.
LibraryThing member AbigailAdams26
Grandmother and Maggie live on the edge of a cranberry bog in New England in this delightful Thanksgiving classic, first published in 1971. The creator of the finest cranberry bread in the country, Grandmother guards her recipe zealously, intending to pass it down to Maggie one day. When
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Thanksgiving dinner arrives, the two invited guests - the lavender-smelling, gold-cane-walking Mr. Horace, and the scruffy, bearded sea captain Mr. Whiskers (real name: Uriah Peabody) - couldn't present more of a contrast. Grandmother prefers Mr. Horace to the smelly Mr. Whiskers, whom she had never trusted, but appearances aren't everything, as she soon learns...

I have read and enjoyed all three of Wende and Harry Devlin's picture-books about the Old Black Witch - Old Black Witch, Old Witch and the Polka-Dot Ribbon, and Old Witch Rescues Halloween - but although I have long been aware of their Cranberry series, I have never gotten around to picking any of them up. How glad I am that I now have, as I found Cranberry Thanksgiving absolutely charming, enjoying both the story and the artwork. The illustrations here have a vintage cartoon-like style reminiscent of many of the books I read as a young girl, in the early 1980s. Recommended to anyone who appreciates vintage picture-books, or who is looking for fun Thanksgiving stories for the picture-book set!
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LibraryThing member sjordet
The Cranberry Series is one of my favorite children's books series. "Cranberry Thankgiving" begins with Maggie and her Grandmother preparing for Thanksgiving. Grandmother is known for her cranberry bread but refuses to give the recipe away. Instead, she hides it behind a brick in the fireplace. An
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annual tradition, both Maggie and her Grandmother invite one guest each to Thanksgiving dinner. While Grandmother invites a well established man named Mr. Horace, Maggie (to the displeasure of her Grandmother) invites her "unclean" friend Mr. Whiskers. Grandmother is not happy that Mr. Whiskers is coming because she believes that he is after her cranberry bread recipe. When both men arrive, Grandmother is quick to give Mr. Whiskers the cold shoulder. While cleaning up after dinner with her Grandmother, Maggie witnesses one of the guests stealing her grandmother's recipe. A fight errupts between Mr. Horace and Mr. Whiskers outside and Grandmother assumes that she was right - Mr. Whiskers was after her recipe. Maggie then tells her grandmother that it was not Mr. Whiskers who took the recipe, it was Mr. Horace who is a baker in the city. Astonished, Grandmother kicks out Mr. Horace. Greatful to Mr. Whiskers for stopping Mr. Horace, Grandmother warms up to his company and invites him to join Maggie and her for some pumpkin pie. After hearing Mr. Horace's wails from outside, the group agrees to let him in for the last piece of pie.

"Cranberry Thanksgiving" has incredible illustrations with plenty of character detail. The moral of the story is that not everyone is who they appear to be. The end of the story also teaches readers the importance of being kind to others.
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Original publication date

1971

ISBN

0819304980 / 9780819304988
Page: 0.1395 seconds