Andy and the Lion (Picture Puffin Books)

by James Daugherty

Paperback, 1989

Status

Available

Call number

398.2452974428

Collection

Publication

Puffin Books (1989), Edition: Reprint, 72 pages

Description

In this retelling of Androcles and the Lion, Andy meets a lion on the way to school and wins his friendship for life by removing a thorn from his paw.

User reviews

LibraryThing member AbigailAdams26
Originally published in 1938, and awarded a Caldecott Honor in 1939 - the medal-winner that year was Thomas Handforth's Mei Li - this charming picture-book follows the story of Andy, a lion-obsessed young boy who has an unexpected encounter with his favorite subject. Checking out a book about lions
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from the library one day, Andy is so engrossed that he reads through dinner, listening to his grandfather's stories of hunting lions in the evening. On his way to school the very next day, Andy happens upon a lion in need of help, and goes to his assistance, forming a friendship that stands the test of time, when the lions returns much later, as part of a circus act...

I was reminded here, both by the story and by its subtitle - "A Tale of Kindness Remembered or the Power of Gratitude" - of the Aesopic fable of Androcles and the Lion, with the boy doing the lion a kindness, and then being ecstatically greeted (and not harmed) by the lion in turn. This one is a little long for a picture-book - it is divided up into very brief chapters, or parts - but for slightly older picture-book audiences, I think it will be a winner. The story is engaging (and emphasizes the importance of the library!), and the artwork, done in black and white with brown accents, is exuberant and full of fun. Recommended to young readers who enjoy animal stories!
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LibraryThing member nadinegsmith
andy helps the lion and the lion remembers him
LibraryThing member kdhayes06
Summary: This is a story of a boy’s kindness and the friendship forged between the boy and a lion. It is easy for young readers to read with chapter numbers built in to introduce the concept of chapters. The setting is an earlier America and a very simple way of life.

Personal Reaction: The
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imagination is a great and wonderful thing. The illustrations are done in orange and black set on a white background allowing all the action to take center stage. This is a great book for that beginner reader to pick up and get introduced to a story being divided into sections.

Classroom Extension:
1. A great tool to help get the concepts of kindness and helping others across.
2. Have the children use their imaginations and draw a picture of them with a lion.
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LibraryThing member mr.discovampire
This book was odd at first it wasn't until the end that i figured out what was going on. The kid was inside the book he had checked out and I thought he was actually doing these things. But i guess this just goes to say that a good book should pull you in. The boys imagination is killer awesome.
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The art work was pretty cool it wasn't awesome. I would say it was cute.

I liked the book in the end because I could relate to the main character. i love it when book can grip me and draw me into the story lline. i love feeling like an innocent bystander watching these character's lives unfold before me.

This could be used for discussion with an older audience. Ask kids if they have ever read a book that just made them feel like they were there.
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LibraryThing member allawishus
This is a retelling of a fable you've probably heard before - it's about a lion who gets a thorn stuck in his paw and the little boy who helps him pull it out. The illustrations are interesting - I especially like the image of Andy and his little dog asleep in front of the fire. Andy, however,
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seems to vary from very young to adult-sized in the drawings - greater consistency would have been nice. The tale has a good message about friendship and helping others - but it's definitely not preachy. I think it'd be a good storytime book, but kids might be put off by the old-fashioned illustrations.
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LibraryThing member CLDoyle
Appropriate grade level for this book would be Kindergarten to 3rd grade. This book has received the Caldecott Medal. This story is about a little boy named Andy who goes to the library and borrows a book about lions. This topic interested him so much. One day, Andy meets a lion and becomes friends
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with him, the lion gets a thorn in his paw and Andy helps him get it out. Uses in the classroom for this book would be to have the students research a topic that they're interested in, they could do a writing assignment on why that specific topic interests them. Younger students could draw and tell the teacher or a friend about something that they're interested in as well.
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LibraryThing member Turrean
I love this book. It's a great retelling of the fable of Androcles and the Lion--already a good reason to read it--but it's also beautifully paced for a read-aloud, and is full of fresh, funny details, like Andy's convenient back-pocket pliers, and the way the characters tumble head-over-heels as
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the thorn is taken from the paw. The book was first published in 1938, but my first graders were charmed.
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LibraryThing member DianeVogan
This book has been a favorite of mine for years.
LibraryThing member NMiller22
In this retelling of Androcles and the Lion, Andy meets lion on the way to school and wins his friendship for life by removing a thorn from his paw.

Subjects

Lexile

510L

Language

Original language

English

Original publication date

1938

Physical description

8.88 inches

ISBN

0140502777 / 9780140502770

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