Immanuel's Veins

by Ted Dekker

Paperback, 2010

Status

Available

Call number

813.54

Publication

Thomas Nelson (2010), Edition: International ed., 382 pages

Original publication date

2010

Description

In 1772, Catherine the Great sends trusted warrior Toma Nicolescu to protect the Cantemir family, but when their daughter, Lucine, steals his heart, he is forced to keep silent while another lad begins courting her.

Language

Original language

English

ISBN

1595547622 / 9781595547620

User reviews

LibraryThing member ReviewsbyMolly
Oh. My. Goodness. Wow and wow again! Ted Dekker is splendidly FANTASTIC!!! With Ted Dekker, you just never know what you are going to get. You could get a Christian Sci-Fi style book (for instance-Green, which was not my taste), you could get a fantastic suspense thriller, like The Bride Collector,
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which,by the way, rocked, or you could get the best historical, fictional love story of all times in his newest release Immanuel's Veins. When this became available to review, I jumped on it. It sounded beautifully amazing and I am so happy to say that it didn't disappoint!

The incredibly instense feeling you get when you dive into page one is beyond any description! You instantly fall in love with Alek, Toma and the scenery beyond them. As you read on, and meet Natasha and Lucine, two beautiful twins with completely separate minds, the sparks begin to fly all around the story. The breath taking suspense had me turning the pages of this riveting love story, far into the night and early morning hours. The deepest and most incredible aspects of this sensual story was the power of sacrificial love and the scriptural details woven into the words.

As I was reading Immanuel's Veins, I was thinking to myself, that I want to feel everything these amazing characters were feeling. By the end of the book, I realized that I could just that and have that tender sacrificial love and be satisfied for the rest of my life. I could find that kind of love in my Father. That is a wonderful feeling, knowing that you are loved that much by a Father who knows you like know other!

This book is truly unforgettable. If you have never read a Ted Dekker book, then please, start here, right now, with Immanuel's Veins. You'll get the intensity of the good verses evil, the thrill of page turning suspense and betrayal, the tenderness of a passionate love like no other, and the fabulous mercy of forgiveness and redemption. If you've already read Ted Dekker's books, then don't hesitate to grab a copy of this unforgettable, 5 star-more than 5 stars really- book. I was one of the ones who was FOR this story....will you be one of them, too???

*This book was provided for review by Thomas Nelson's BookSneeze*
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LibraryThing member fredamans
Enrapturing.
From beginning to end. That was this book. I absolutely loved it!
This was my first time reading Ted Dekker, though I had heard lots about his works. Many of my friends know I love horror, and recommended him.
I'm so glad this book was my introduction to his writing and storytelling. It
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was so beautifully written, and the plot well thought out that the next stories I read of his in the future, will have a lot to live up to.
A really gripping yet not-too-scary novel. One that I definitely recommend to all older teens and adults that like Vampires. I should add these are not your usual Vampires either. I don't want to give anything away, but they are unlike any I have heard of, and I liked it even more for that.
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LibraryThing member kittycrochettwo
The year is 1772, and Toma Nicolescu and his friend Alec Cardei have seen their fair share of battles while serving the empress of Russia, Catherine the Great. So when they are dispatched to Moldavia to protect the Cantemir family, a very influential family in Moldavia, until the empress could
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appoint a ruler for that country who would be loyal to Catherine the Great, they think it will be an easy job.
The Cantemir family consisted of Kesia and her twin daughters Lucine and Natasha. Both girls had been taught by their mothers to live as free spirits and basically do whatever felt good, but an unplanned pregnancy and the loss of a baby when Lucine was seventeen had sort of tempered her ways, but not Natasha, she basically is always looking for a good time. Alec known as a ladies man was immediately lusting after Natasha, and while Toma was warned by the empress not to become romantically involved,becomes drawn to Lucine, but keeps his feelings at bay until he feels that Lucine is being threatened by Vlad Van Valerik.
When Toma realizes is that Vlad and his entourage aren't what they seem, he knows he will do whatever it takes to save the woman he loves, no matter the cost.
I found this book to be very thought provoking, where the characters feelings are so real that you can feel the anguish that Toma felt as well as the evil emitting from Vlad. I really enjoyed how Mr. Dekker tied Vlad's history to the book of Genesis, I only wish he would have traced his history to Lilith instead of the Nephilim.
This isn't a clear cut christian novel but instead has so many more elements, it has that horror story element of blood drinking vampires, but it also reminds us of God's unconditional love for us, and how it took the blood of our Savior to save us all!

An amazing read, that I won't soon forget.

This is my first opportunity to read anything written by Mr. Dekker and I am now his newest fan!
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LibraryThing member Tinasbookreviews
It comes to no surprise that Ted can and did take on a very provocative story. As he is one my favorite authors, I’ve found his most recent work to be daring, out of the box and brilliant!! I think many fans of Dekker will love the boldness and will be able to handle the metaphoric vampires in
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his story, while new fans will defiantly appreciate the darker elements that IV has to offer. Certainly though this could be considered a bit controversial in the Christian mainstream due to the sensuality of the book which I thought was beautifully done...........................
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LibraryThing member echoesofstars
What a intriguing book! It's a dark romance with a Christian (although not overtly in-your-face) twist. If you like vampire novels and tales of love, possession, and redemption, then this is the book for you. A quick, excellent read that you just can't put down!
LibraryThing member mary.kyart
This book was entertaining to a point. It had potential, but I was over all dissatisfied. I'm not a fan of the turn Dekker's theology has been taking the past few years either... He's not anti-Catholic, but in his attempt to be more radical I think he's going askew. At first this was somewhat
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tolerable because it didn't show up in his books as much- but in this one, well, it was hard to avoid or overlook.
There was one point in the book that would cause me to think he was anti-Catholic, in that he hero runs to a church and finds a priest hoping for help against vampires and the possessed. The church sees him as crazy and locks him up, says crazy things, etc. If I didn't know Dekker better, I would say this was an intended attack. Maybe it was, I have not read all of his new works. But what I do know is that at one point he was not. Adam, in which a main character was a priest, was not. It was a biiit off, but not anti-Catholic.
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LibraryThing member dragonflychic76
Toma Nicolesu is a warrior, dispatched by Her Majesty, Catherine the Great to Moldavia. He and his friend Alec Cardei are sent to protect the twin Cantemir sisters at all cost. Despite Her Majesty's warning against it, Toma finds himself falling in love with Lucine, the dark haired twin. When he
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receives notice in the form of a message from the empress informing him that he is to protect the life and heart of Lucine, he is heartbroken. She is to be courted by Russian royalty and no one else.

In the neighboring Castle Castile, Russian aristocrats have moved in and taken a strange interest in the Cantemirs. Toma begins to suspect something evil is behind the mysterious Vlad Van Valerik who seems to be the leader of this clan of Russians. Lucine's sister, Natasha disappears at night to the Castle Castile to dance and returns the next morning covered in blood but with no visible wounds. When Alec agrees to go with her to protect her he soon becomes 'infected' as well. Toma rushes to bring them both back only to find much more than he ever imagined.

I was completely awestruck by this book from the first chapter. I simply couldn't put it down. There were plenty of moments when my heart was racing to the point where I thought it would fly right out of my chest. This is a love story. Pure and beautiful and heart-wrenching all at once. It is a story of redemption and healing, life after death. It is breathtaking and enchanting, fantastic and unearthly...it is exquisite.
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LibraryThing member starlitehouse
One of those books I am glad I didn't waste my money on. Boring, predictable,and a waste of good paper.
LibraryThing member Barb_H
Audiobook. I am not going to finish this one. It's not the type of book I was expecting. I thought it was another of Ted's psychological thrillers. It's definitely not. So far it's just a boring love story and not something I am interested in.
LibraryThing member Shelby_Kuzma
I thought this book was alright. It was very entertaining but I really didn't like how it ended.
LibraryThing member ChrissyChris
A Barnes & Noble book of the day purchase. Glad I didn't pay full price for this one. Interesting in it's world building, it eventually fell flat as a riff on the Dracula myth.
LibraryThing member CinaChilders
Immanuel's Veins is unlike any other book that Ted Dekker has written thus far. This story is not for everyone, quoting from the book. It is mysterious, adventurous, and even romantic. It's different, but that's a good thing.
LibraryThing member jesssika
I have mixed emotions. Here is a book that uses a hymn, no less, for a new idea. I have read about vampires and I have read about the nephilim. I have not, however, read about the nephilim being vampires. So, I was intrigued. The writing itself of setting up for a mysterious evil was good in the
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beginning. But, then things became rushed. Instead of talking about how Toma became in love with Lucine, he tells the reactions to events we do not get to be a party to in the writing.

Initially, we read of how confused Toma is of his reaction to Lucine and how his heart thaws. Then, the next chapter is a few days ahead and Toma is in love though he doesn’t wish to admit it. Toma’s character is initiated as being suited to duty and honor, and he states he doesn’t give in to love especially since on this particular mission he’s been directed not to. So, for him to so easily fall in love and not get to really see the undoing of years of service to honor, it’s a bit of a contradiction to the way his character was introduced.

I think this is a good plot and a good story. However, it’s the carry through that has thrown people. To set a character up to be one way and within pages turn that on it’s axle without letting the readers be a part of how it happened makes the story feel rushed. I loved the hymn being used and the verging of these two types of beings. I like the love conquers all theme. I just feel that parts of the story were missing and would have added to the understanding why these two fell so madly in love that it was able to defeat evil.
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LibraryThing member VincentDarlage
Not bad, but not great. Certainly not the life-changing experience promised on the cover and in pages upon pages of reader comments.

By the way, naming the progenitor of the vampires "Alucard" ("Dracula" spelled backwards) hasn't been original since at least 1943 (with Universal's "Son of
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Dracula"). Hammer films and countless stories since have used that little trick.

It had some solid moments, but the characters were, overall, as thin as paper.

I think Christians just love to proclaim that any book with a Christian message is "life-changing." Sad. Not the best way to promote this book, I think.
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LibraryThing member jessica_reads
I have mixed emotions. Here is a book that uses a hymn, no less, for a new idea. I have read about vampires and I have read about the nephilim. I have not, however, read about the nephilim being vampires. So, I was intrigued. The writing itself of setting up for a mysterious evil was good in the
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beginning. But, then things became rushed. Instead of talking about how Toma became in love with Lucine, he tells the reactions to events we do not get to be a party to in the writing.

Initially, we read of how confused Toma is of his reaction to Lucine and how his heart thaws. Then, the next chapter is a few days ahead and Toma is in love though he doesn���t wish to admit it. Toma���s character is initiated as being suited to duty and honor, and he states he doesn���t give in to love especially since on this particular mission he���s been directed not to. So, for him to so easily fall in love and not get to really see the undoing of years of service to honor, it���s a bit of a contradiction to the way his character was introduced.

I think this is a good plot and a good story. However, it���s the carry through that has thrown people. To set a character up to be one way and within pages turn that on it���s axle without letting the readers be a part of how it happened makes the story feel rushed. I loved the hymn being used and the verging of these two types of beings. I like the love conquers all theme. I just feel that parts of the story were missing and would have added to the understanding why these two fell so madly in love that it was able to defeat evil.
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LibraryThing member debs4jc
A Christian writes a vampire novel, and does a pretty good job. Dekker's tale it told entirely through the eyes of Toma - a Russian warrior sent to an isolated estate in the Carpathian mountains to protect the family living there. The family consists of a mother and two beautiful twin daughters.
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Toma is instantly attracted to one of the daughters, Lucine, who he meets at the ball held the first night of his arrival. Some mysterious Russians arrive at the ball and they immediately stir up trouble after the other twin daughter is bitten on the lip and then faints. From then on there is a lot of going back and forth between the estate and the castle inhabited by the Russians and belonging to Vlad Van Valoric. Gradually the reader learns that they like to bite people on the lips and drink their blood, as well as drink a weird wine mingled with the blood of their leader, Vlad. Vlad has chosen Lucine to become his bride and eventually Toma must fight against this group of evil being to free the woman he loves.
This was a solid story, but perhaps a bit longer than it needed to be. It sort of drug in the middle section but the battle scene at the end was fairly suspenseful. It's not one that will stick with me though. A good read for someone looking for a "Halloween" story with a Christian twist, though.
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