Face Of Betrayal - A Triple Threat Novel

by April Lis; with Henry Wiehl

Hardcover, 2008

Status

Available

Call number

813.6

Publication

Thomas Nelson Inc. (2008), Edition: First Edition, 310 pages

Original publication date

2008

Description

Fiction. Mystery. HTML: While home on Christmas break, a seventeen-year-old Senate page takes her dog out for a walk and never returns. Reporter Cassidy Shaw is the first to break the story. The resulting media firestorm quickly ensnares Federal Prosecutor Allison Pierce and FBI Special Agent Nicole Hedges. The three unique women are life-long friends who call themselves The Triple Threat--a nickname derived from their favorite dessert and their uncanny ability to crack cases via their three positions of power. Though authorities think Katie might have been kidnapped or run away, those theories shatter when Nicole uncovers Katie's blog. They reveal a girl troubled by a mysterious relationship with an older man. Possibly a U.S. Senator. As the three women race against time to find Katie alive, their increasing emotional involvement brings out their own inner demons and external enemies. There are many faces of betrayal, but they must find the one face in a crowd of growing suspects before they become the next victims. Insert disc 7 into your PC to access PDF material containing an interview with Bill O'Reilly and review questions..… (more)

Awards

Audie Award (Finalist — Fiction — 2010)

Language

Physical description

310 p.

ISBN

1595547053 / 9781595547057

User reviews

LibraryThing member em18966
I love a good mystery as much as the next person. The only problem is that is it exceedingly difficult to find one. I mean, when you have figured it out within the first five chapters, the book quickly becomes irrelevant. No matter how well the characters are developed or how engagingly the book is
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written.

Luckily, "Face of Betrayal" was a good mystery. One that actually kept me guessing from the first page to the last. Because the characters begin to draw you in from the very beginning, where you are introduced to Allison Pierce. She is a no-nonsense prosecuting attorney who soon finds herself deeply entrenched in the mysterious disappearance of a 17-year old Senate page, Katie. With the help of her friends Cassidy (an up and coming television reporter) and Nicole (an FBI agent), Allison attempts to unravel the twisted threads of Katies life and bring her abductor to light. Over the course of the investigation, it is discovered that Katie may have been carrying on an adulterous affair with a U.S. Senator, which suddenly transforms a missing person case into the story of the year. (In fact, the entire story feels vaguely familiar. It's as if Lis Wiehl took the most sensational parts of the biggest news stories of the last year or so and combined them into one.)

I am not going to say anything that could be a spoiler, but the entire plot of the story is fantastic. Everything flows, the characters are very well developed, and all of the sub-plots are very relevant and come together in the end. (There's nothing worse than a story full of pointless filler plots and red herrings.) And you will find yourself surprised at the twist at the end when the whodunit is exposed.

Honestly, I didn't have the highest of expectations for "Face of Betrayal." I mean, Wiehl is a legal analyst for FOX NEWS. I was actually a little bit afraid (tic). But I changed my tune before I finished chapter one, and I would recommend this book to anyone. Easily 4 ½ out of 5 stars. And this is only book one of the Triple Threat Series. I will now be anxiously awaiting the release of book two, "Hand of Fate" in April of 2010.
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LibraryThing member FicusFan
I will be upfront, I didn't read much of this book before I quit. Someone in our mystery book group picked this, without realizing it was a bad Christian book. Big mistake.

I don't care what religion anyone is, or if they choose not to believe. I am fine with it. I can even read about religious
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characters if it is done well. What I am not fine with is having the religion in question pushed in my face. And when you combine it with bad writing and plastic perfect settings and characters, it just isn't worth reading.

I quit when I ran into almost 2 pages of praying, by one of the characters. Tell me they prayed, even about what, but don't drag it out, or make it so I have to sit through the praying. I don't mind Christian books if the religion is worked into the story, and not forced. Mel Starr writes a wonderful series of Christian Medieval mysteries with a religious main character. His depiction is of a religious character without going overboard. It was worked into the story and the character's situation.

The writing in this book is bad because it all seems flat, perfect and plastic. Even the bad spots or flaws seem to be squeaky clean. There is no grittiness and no reality. You do not believe these are real people and you don't really care what happens to them. Sort of like comic book characters.
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LibraryThing member kysmom02
Face of Betrayal is about 3 women who are friends and who happen to be involved in different aspects of crime fighting. Nicole is an FBI investigator, Allison is a prosecuting attorney and Cassidy is a crime journalist. In this story, they are working to find out what happened to a 17 year old girl
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who was working in an elite group with U.S. Senators, named Katie Converse. Katie initially is assumed kidnapped, then presumed murdered. While all of this is going on, each of the women have conflicts and personal struggles happening in their own lives.

I struggled with this book when I first started reading it. It starts out a little choppy with short chapters that bounce around from person to person. So, I’d say that I was a little disappointed at the start. However, as I got further into it, the story started to come together. The short chapters still caused several breaks in the story line, but it was making more sense. I expected this book to be a little more tense and suspenseful. While I didn’t know what happened to Katie until the end of the book, I wasn’t kept on the edge of my seat by any action. The story almost seemed to be told from an outsiders view. It just seemed really detached. All that said, I still enjoyed the book. It was a quick read and provided a twist, and even a couple of laughs.
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LibraryThing member smilingsally
Three friends who met in college and team up to form the Triple Threat Club, and solve a crime in this fast paced suspense novel. There's Cassidy, a TV reporter, who covers crime, Nicole, a police officer, who fights crime, and Allison, an attorney who prosecutes criminals.

There's an understory as
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one of the friends is threatened and another understory of domestic abuse, giving the reader three stories in one book. Although I guessed the bad guy's identity, I was still surprised at the end. Good read! Reading group guide at the conclusion, along with an interview with the author by Bill O'Reilly.
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LibraryThing member thetometraveller
Katie Converse is a smart, beautiful, seventeen year old Senate page from Portland, Oregon. At home in Portland for Christmas, she disappears while walking the dog. Her parents immediately raise the hue and cry and a desperate search begins.

Local Portland television reporter Cassidy Shaw announces
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the story of Katie's disappearance on the air. The media firestorm that follows could be the making of her career, if she can keep herself at the forefront of the action. Good thing for Cassidy that her two best friends become involved in the case, as well. Federal prosecutor Allison Pierce and FBI agent Nicole Hedge are Cassidy's buddies. As a group the call themselves "The Triple Threat Club" and they get together regularly to try to sort out the difficulties of their crazy lives. Cassidy is able to glean important bits of information about the case from Allison and Nicole because both women are soon sucked into the investigation that mushrooms around the case.

When Nicole discovers that Katie had a Myspace page that she posted on regularly, things really start to heat up. Turns out Katie was having a little fling with "Senator X." It isn't too hard to figure out that "Senator X" is actually Senator Fairview, who sponsered Katie's page application. Suddenly the case has taken on a whole new aspect, the well known Senator has motive and opportunity. His relationship with Katie is certainly a juicy scandal, but is he really her killer?

This fast paced, interesting suspense novel has a premise that could easily have been ripped from the headlines. All of the characters are well-rounded and their relationships feel authentic. The point of view rotates between Cassidy, Allison and Nicole so the reader gets to know the personal struggles of each woman and how they relate to each other as a group of close friends. Cassidy is a beautiful girl with a promising career, but she is stuck in an abusive relationship. Allison and her husband have been struggling with infertility, under the stress of trying to have a baby for the past several years. Nicole is a single mom, juggling parenting her child and the demands of her job. She doesn't seem to have any time left over for a personal life. Because of their unique relationship they are able to put their heads together and figure out what happened to Katie Converse. Interspersed between the chapters are Katie's Myspace pages. Through these, the reader gets to know a little about Katie's life.

The action keeps the reader guessing and turning pages in this absorbing tale. Ms. Wiehl's experience with the media and the government are apparent and lend the book a veracity that makes it seem to almost read like a non-fiction story.

Looking for an exciting contemporary mystery with strong female characters? Add Face of Betrayal to your summer reading list!
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LibraryThing member SandyLee
A twist on the Shaundra Levy case. Three friends call themselves the "Triple Threat." A prosecuting attorney, FBI agent, and reporter work together to find out who killed a 17-year-old Congressional page. Each woman has some angst in her life. The attorney is pregnant after years of trying and
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worried about the future. The FBI agent is a single mother untrusting of relationships. The reporter falls in and out of love too easily and encounters an abusive boyfriend. Although I was raised a Catholic, I still find "in your face" faith a bit of a turn off. The attorney is the one character who "prays" within the narrative. She consults her priest regarding her pregnancy and the case. She discusses religion with her friends (one who is an agnostic) and although it separates her from the other characters' beliefs, it was a bit much for this reader who was taught to keep faith private. Hinkey feelings turn me off to a book but I did finish it because I wanted to see who the guilty party was so the plot did move along and did entice me to keep turning the pages.
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LibraryThing member hoosiers80
Face of Betrayal is a look into processes of the American legal system. It follows the story from the perspective of 3 women who are friends. One is a television reporter, while another a prosecutor, and the other a detective on the case. The story follows the case of 17 yr old Katie Converse, who
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has gone missing while walking the family dog. You will follow the twists and turns of the case trying to determine who is responsible. Is it the local senator who has always had an interest in young girls? This book will keep you guessing until the end.

This book was an enjoyable read with an interesting perspective of the American justice system. Wiehl as former federal prosecutor delves into the realm of the crime scene investigation. While the story line is similar to many mystery/detective books, the appeal is Wiehl's angle as someone who has been on the other side of this type of story. How might a prosecutor or detective approach a case of a missing girl? The Christianity in this story is not a key component of the book. One character is a Christian, but does not look much at that aspect of the character. If you a looking for a novel with deep Christian meaning, this is not the book. If you are looking for a interesting book with basic Christian morality, this is a book that you will enjoy.
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LibraryThing member dougcornelius
Lis Wiehl has added another element to her career, from trial lawyer to Fox News commentator and now a novelist. The publisher sent me a copy of her book: Face of Betrayal.

I generally would not bother writing a review for book this bad, but I agreed to write a review in exchange for a copy of the
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book. Given the the that it is a pulpy crime novel and that Lis had a contributor, I had low expectations. Even those lowered expectations were not met.

The book is a "Triple Threat Novel" with three narrators: FBI Agent, reporter and prosecutor. Three friends who share food and drinks in Portland, Oregon. I couldn't tell the difference in the narration between the three. It just confused the story and viewpoints.

The primary story is a Senate page home for vacation takes her dog out for a walk and never returns. The triple threat team each take their respective role in investigating and reporting the crime. Each of the triple threat has their own battles to fight. One has a stalker, one is in an abusive relationship and one is a single parent.

The characters are flat, the story is predictable and the ending is rushed. If you are looking for a crime novel, try William Landay's Mission Flats or Stieg Larsson's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Unless you're a Lis Wiehl fan, don't bother wasting an afternoon with Face of Betrayal.
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LibraryThing member evensonly
Great first book for Lis Wiehl. Suspenseful thriller that kept me turning the pages. Looking forward to her next books.
LibraryThing member slarsoncollins
I thought the character development was great, good descriptions and you get pulled into the scenes. The problem, as I saw in another review as well, was there were no clues as to who the killer was. Just kinda popped in there. The writing was good, just needed some tweaking of the story line to at
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least hint at the guilty party. That said, I'll read additional books by this author if I happen to stumble across them.
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LibraryThing member Bettyb30
This book was excellent for those that like suspenseful murder mystry. You will never get who it is till almost the end of the book! It was fab!!
LibraryThing member jesssika
Katie Converse a Senate Page has come home from Christmas. She left a young girl striving to reach her dreams. She came home changed. Out walking the dog she meets someone. Now cut to Cassidy Allison and Nicole. Three unlikely friends who deal with crime in three different ways. They make a team
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they call the Triple Threat Club with Nicole working for the FBI Allison as an attorney and Cassidy as a News Anchor. Together they can help each other solve a terrible kidnapping. A senator could be to blame or maybe a homeless man? There are so many twists and turns you won't want to put this down.

In this story there is so much information. Looking back now I don't know how I didn't get confused reading about everyone involved. It's unique to see how well written this story is. You get to know the Converse family Allison and her struggles and many jobs Cassidy and her job and relationships Nicole with her work and daughter a Senator and his bad behavior and many small teens stories too. How they all connect together to help formulate the kidnapping and murder of a 17 year old girl is skillful. I didn't want to put it down and liked for the most part how it tied up. The only thing I didn't like was that in the last couple of chapters virtually everything got fixed with a happily ever after. I know it's not techincally a happily ever after but it just seemed to tie up so easily and quickly in comparison to the rate the rest of the story went. Still totally worth the read.
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LibraryThing member charlotteg
Face of Betrayal is a well written suspense thriller. The author has done her research and it shows in the little details. The book is a fast paced read. But it leaves you wanting more. I am already looking forward to book two of The Triple Threat series
LibraryThing member NPJacobsen
A nice little mystery ripped from the headlines. Lis Wiehl uses her experiences as a federal prosecutor and television journalist, as well as her father's career as an FBI agent, to create three very different characters all fighting for the same goals.

The book takes place mostly in Portland,
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Oregon. Three women, who had known each other since high school, are re-united after their career paths once again converge. Allison, federal prosecutor, is the only one not to have left Portland. Married and trying to start a family, she seems the most stable of the trio. Firmly grounded in her Christian faith, Allison will not hesitate to turn to her pastor in times of trouble. Cassidy, the television news reporter, has worked her way up from small market news reporter to the mid market Portland news. Always looking for the angle that will be her big break, Cassidy always has a different take on events. Seeming to latch on to the latest new age fad, Cassidy seems to be struggling for acceptance. Nicole, the third in the triple threat club, is a black female FBI agent. She too had left Portland until her career path had re-united her with her friends. An unwed mother, the identity of her daughters father remains a well kept secret. An agnostic, Nicole thinks that both Allison and Cassidy are foolish for placing their faith in non-existent entities.

The mystery, and it is a very good one, starts when Katie Converse, a senate page home in Portland over the Christmas break, takes her dog out for a walk and never returns. The Converse family contacts Cassidy in order to garner publicity to help find their missing daughter. This publicity soon turns nationwide, and Cassidy thinks she has finally received her big break. Nicole has been assigned FBI liaison to the Converse family. Allison, as federal prosecutor, sets up a grand jury to investigate senator Fairview, Katie's sponsor in the page program and number one suspect in her disappearance.

The three meet regularly, just as friends normally will, and inevitably compare notes. They refer to themselves as "Triple Threat," as much for the dessert they share as for their three prong attack on crime. There are other things going on in their lives as well. Allison has been receiving death threats. Cassidy is involved in an abusive relationship, and Nicole finally has a love interest. But all three have an emotional connection to Katie Converse, and she takes center stage in their respective lives during the time the case remains active.

As I said earlier, the mystery was very good. I was a little surprised by the ending, but the clues were mostly present to solve the case. The problem I had with the book, and thus only 4 stars, were the characters. They seemed too stereotypical. The over-achieving television news woman, the double minority FBI agent who has to be twice as good as the next agent, and the firmly grounded federal prosecutor struggling to start a family. My next observation is that all three women should be big enough to float above the Macy's Thanksgiving parade. They always meet over food - burgers and fries, tacos, pizza, etc. - and always ends with some kind of exotic dessert which they share. These are probably minor discrepancies, however they did bother me enough to make an impact on my rating.

I would recommend this to fans of good mysteries and will read more of Ms. Wiehl's Triple Threat novels in the future.

Comment Comment | Permalink
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LibraryThing member NPJacobsen
A nice little mystery ripped from the headlines. Lis Wiehl uses her experiences as a federal prosecutor and television journalist, as well as her father's career as an FBI agent, to create three very different characters all fighting for the same goals.

The book takes place mostly in Portland,
Show More
Oregon. Three women, who had known each other since high school, are re-united after their career paths once again converge. Allison, federal prosecutor, is the only one not to have left Portland. Married and trying to start a family, she seems the most stable of the trio. Firmly grounded in her Christian faith, Allison will not hesitate to turn to her pastor in times of trouble. Cassidy, the television news reporter, has worked her way up from small market news reporter to the mid market Portland news. Always looking for the angle that will be her big break, Cassidy always has a different take on events. Seeming to latch on to the latest new age fad, Cassidy seems to be struggling for acceptance. Nicole, the third in the triple threat club, is a black female FBI agent. She too had left Portland until her career path had re-united her with her friends. An unwed mother, the identity of her daughters father remains a well kept secret. An agnostic, Nicole thinks that both Allison and Cassidy are foolish for placing their faith in non-existent entities.

The mystery, and it is a very good one, starts when Katie Converse, a senate page home in Portland over the Christmas break, takes her dog out for a walk and never returns. The Converse family contacts Cassidy in order to garner publicity to help find their missing daughter. This publicity soon turns nationwide, and Cassidy thinks she has finally received her big break. Nicole has been assigned FBI liaison to the Converse family. Allison, as federal prosecutor, sets up a grand jury to investigate senator Fairview, Katie's sponsor in the page program and number one suspect in her disappearance.

The three meet regularly, just as friends normally will, and inevitably compare notes. They refer to themselves as "Triple Threat," as much for the dessert they share as for their three prong attack on crime. There are other things going on in their lives as well. Allison has been receiving death threats. Cassidy is involved in an abusive relationship, and Nicole finally has a love interest. But all three have an emotional connection to Katie Converse, and she takes center stage in their respective lives during the time the case remains active.

As I said earlier, the mystery was very good. I was a little surprised by the ending, but the clues were mostly present to solve the case. The problem I had with the book, and thus only 4 stars, were the characters. They seemed too stereotypical. The over-achieving television news woman, the double minority FBI agent who has to be twice as good as the next agent, and the firmly grounded federal prosecutor struggling to start a family. My next observation is that all three women should be big enough to float above the Macy's Thanksgiving parade. They always meet over food - burgers and fries, tacos, pizza, etc. - and always ends with some kind of exotic dessert which they share. These are probably minor discrepancies, however they did bother me enough to make an impact on my rating.

I would recommend this to fans of good mysteries and will read more of Ms. Wiehl's Triple Threat novels in the future.

Comment Comment | Permalink
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LibraryThing member NPJacobsen
A nice little mystery ripped from the headlines. Lis Wiehl uses her experiences as a federal prosecutor and television journalist, as well as her father's career as an FBI agent, to create three very different characters all fighting for the same goals.

The book takes place mostly in Portland,
Show More
Oregon. Three women, who had known each other since high school, are re-united after their career paths once again converge. Allison, federal prosecutor, is the only one not to have left Portland. Married and trying to start a family, she seems the most stable of the trio. Firmly grounded in her Christian faith, Allison will not hesitate to turn to her pastor in times of trouble. Cassidy, the television news reporter, has worked her way up from small market news reporter to the mid market Portland news. Always looking for the angle that will be her big break, Cassidy always has a different take on events. Seeming to latch on to the latest new age fad, Cassidy seems to be struggling for acceptance. Nicole, the third in the triple threat club, is a black female FBI agent. She too had left Portland until her career path had re-united her with her friends. An unwed mother, the identity of her daughters father remains a well kept secret. An agnostic, Nicole thinks that both Allison and Cassidy are foolish for placing their faith in non-existent entities.

The mystery, and it is a very good one, starts when Katie Converse, a senate page home in Portland over the Christmas break, takes her dog out for a walk and never returns. The Converse family contacts Cassidy in order to garner publicity to help find their missing daughter. This publicity soon turns nationwide, and Cassidy thinks she has finally received her big break. Nicole has been assigned FBI liaison to the Converse family. Allison, as federal prosecutor, sets up a grand jury to investigate senator Fairview, Katie's sponsor in the page program and number one suspect in her disappearance.

The three meet regularly, just as friends normally will, and inevitably compare notes. They refer to themselves as "Triple Threat," as much for the dessert they share as for their three prong attack on crime. There are other things going on in their lives as well. Allison has been receiving death threats. Cassidy is involved in an abusive relationship, and Nicole finally has a love interest. But all three have an emotional connection to Katie Converse, and she takes center stage in their respective lives during the time the case remains active.

As I said earlier, the mystery was very good. I was a little surprised by the ending, but the clues were mostly present to solve the case. The problem I had with the book, and thus only 4 stars, were the characters. They seemed too stereotypical. The over-achieving television news woman, the double minority FBI agent who has to be twice as good as the next agent, and the firmly grounded federal prosecutor struggling to start a family. My next observation is that all three women should be big enough to float above the Macy's Thanksgiving parade. They always meet over food - burgers and fries, tacos, pizza, etc. - and always ends with some kind of exotic dessert which they share. These are probably minor discrepancies, however they did bother me enough to make an impact on my rating.

I would recommend this to fans of good mysteries and will read more of Ms. Wiehl's Triple Threat novels in the future.

Comment Comment | Permalink
Show Less
LibraryThing member NPJacobsen
A nice little mystery ripped from the headlines. Lis Wiehl uses her experiences as a federal prosecutor and television journalist, as well as her father's career as an FBI agent, to create three very different characters all fighting for the same goals.

The book takes place mostly in Portland,
Show More
Oregon. Three women, who had known each other since high school, are re-united after their career paths once again converge. Allison, federal prosecutor, is the only one not to have left Portland. Married and trying to start a family, she seems the most stable of the trio. Firmly grounded in her Christian faith, Allison will not hesitate to turn to her pastor in times of trouble. Cassidy, the television news reporter, has worked her way up from small market news reporter to the mid market Portland news. Always looking for the angle that will be her big break, Cassidy always has a different take on events. Seeming to latch on to the latest new age fad, Cassidy seems to be struggling for acceptance. Nicole, the third in the triple threat club, is a black female FBI agent. She too had left Portland until her career path had re-united her with her friends. An unwed mother, the identity of her daughters father remains a well kept secret. An agnostic, Nicole thinks that both Allison and Cassidy are foolish for placing their faith in non-existent entities.

The mystery, and it is a very good one, starts when Katie Converse, a senate page home in Portland over the Christmas break, takes her dog out for a walk and never returns. The Converse family contacts Cassidy in order to garner publicity to help find their missing daughter. This publicity soon turns nationwide, and Cassidy thinks she has finally received her big break. Nicole has been assigned FBI liaison to the Converse family. Allison, as federal prosecutor, sets up a grand jury to investigate senator Fairview, Katie's sponsor in the page program and number one suspect in her disappearance.

The three meet regularly, just as friends normally will, and inevitably compare notes. They refer to themselves as "Triple Threat," as much for the dessert they share as for their three prong attack on crime. There are other things going on in their lives as well. Allison has been receiving death threats. Cassidy is involved in an abusive relationship, and Nicole finally has a love interest. But all three have an emotional connection to Katie Converse, and she takes center stage in their respective lives during the time the case remains active.

As I said earlier, the mystery was very good. I was a little surprised by the ending, but the clues were mostly present to solve the case. The problem I had with the book, and thus only 4 stars, were the characters. They seemed too stereotypical. The over-achieving television news woman, the double minority FBI agent who has to be twice as good as the next agent, and the firmly grounded federal prosecutor struggling to start a family. My next observation is that all three women should be big enough to float above the Macy's Thanksgiving parade. They always meet over food - burgers and fries, tacos, pizza, etc. - and always ends with some kind of exotic dessert which they share. These are probably minor discrepancies, however they did bother me enough to make an impact on my rating.

I would recommend this to fans of good mysteries and will read more of Ms. Wiehl's Triple Threat novels in the future.

Comment Comment | Permalink
Show Less
LibraryThing member NPJacobsen
A nice little mystery ripped from the headlines. Lis Wiehl uses her experiences as a federal prosecutor and television journalist, as well as her father's career as an FBI agent, to create three very different characters all fighting for the same goals.

The book takes place mostly in Portland,
Show More
Oregon. Three women, who had known each other since high school, are re-united after their career paths once again converge. Allison, federal prosecutor, is the only one not to have left Portland. Married and trying to start a family, she seems the most stable of the trio. Firmly grounded in her Christian faith, Allison will not hesitate to turn to her pastor in times of trouble. Cassidy, the television news reporter, has worked her way up from small market news reporter to the mid market Portland news. Always looking for the angle that will be her big break, Cassidy always has a different take on events. Seeming to latch on to the latest new age fad, Cassidy seems to be struggling for acceptance. Nicole, the third in the triple threat club, is a black female FBI agent. She too had left Portland until her career path had re-united her with her friends. An unwed mother, the identity of her daughters father remains a well kept secret. An agnostic, Nicole thinks that both Allison and Cassidy are foolish for placing their faith in non-existent entities.

The mystery, and it is a very good one, starts when Katie Converse, a senate page home in Portland over the Christmas break, takes her dog out for a walk and never returns. The Converse family contacts Cassidy in order to garner publicity to help find their missing daughter. This publicity soon turns nationwide, and Cassidy thinks she has finally received her big break. Nicole has been assigned FBI liaison to the Converse family. Allison, as federal prosecutor, sets up a grand jury to investigate senator Fairview, Katie's sponsor in the page program and number one suspect in her disappearance.

The three meet regularly, just as friends normally will, and inevitably compare notes. They refer to themselves as "Triple Threat," as much for the dessert they share as for their three prong attack on crime. There are other things going on in their lives as well. Allison has been receiving death threats. Cassidy is involved in an abusive relationship, and Nicole finally has a love interest. But all three have an emotional connection to Katie Converse, and she takes center stage in their respective lives during the time the case remains active.

As I said earlier, the mystery was very good. I was a little surprised by the ending, but the clues were mostly present to solve the case. The problem I had with the book, and thus only 4 stars, were the characters. They seemed too stereotypical. The over-achieving television news woman, the double minority FBI agent who has to be twice as good as the next agent, and the firmly grounded federal prosecutor struggling to start a family. My next observation is that all three women should be big enough to float above the Macy's Thanksgiving parade. They always meet over food - burgers and fries, tacos, pizza, etc. - and always ends with some kind of exotic dessert which they share. These are probably minor discrepancies, however they did bother me enough to make an impact on my rating.

I would recommend this to fans of good mysteries and will read more of Ms. Wiehl's Triple Threat novels in the future.

Comment Comment | Permalink
Show Less
LibraryThing member NPJacobsen
A nice little mystery ripped from the headlines. Lis Wiehl uses her experiences as a federal prosecutor and television journalist, as well as her father's career as an FBI agent, to create three very different characters all fighting for the same goals.

The book takes place mostly in Portland,
Show More
Oregon. Three women, who had known each other since high school, are re-united after their career paths once again converge. Allison, federal prosecutor, is the only one not to have left Portland. Married and trying to start a family, she seems the most stable of the trio. Firmly grounded in her Christian faith, Allison will not hesitate to turn to her pastor in times of trouble. Cassidy, the television news reporter, has worked her way up from small market news reporter to the mid market Portland news. Always looking for the angle that will be her big break, Cassidy always has a different take on events. Seeming to latch on to the latest new age fad, Cassidy seems to be struggling for acceptance. Nicole, the third in the triple threat club, is a black female FBI agent. She too had left Portland until her career path had re-united her with her friends. An unwed mother, the identity of her daughters father remains a well kept secret. An agnostic, Nicole thinks that both Allison and Cassidy are foolish for placing their faith in non-existent entities.

The mystery, and it is a very good one, starts when Katie Converse, a senate page home in Portland over the Christmas break, takes her dog out for a walk and never returns. The Converse family contacts Cassidy in order to garner publicity to help find their missing daughter. This publicity soon turns nationwide, and Cassidy thinks she has finally received her big break. Nicole has been assigned FBI liaison to the Converse family. Allison, as federal prosecutor, sets up a grand jury to investigate senator Fairview, Katie's sponsor in the page program and number one suspect in her disappearance.

The three meet regularly, just as friends normally will, and inevitably compare notes. They refer to themselves as "Triple Threat," as much for the dessert they share as for their three prong attack on crime. There are other things going on in their lives as well. Allison has been receiving death threats. Cassidy is involved in an abusive relationship, and Nicole finally has a love interest. But all three have an emotional connection to Katie Converse, and she takes center stage in their respective lives during the time the case remains active.

As I said earlier, the mystery was very good. I was a little surprised by the ending, but the clues were mostly present to solve the case. The problem I had with the book, and thus only 4 stars, were the characters. They seemed too stereotypical. The over-achieving television news woman, the double minority FBI agent who has to be twice as good as the next agent, and the firmly grounded federal prosecutor struggling to start a family. My next observation is that all three women should be big enough to float above the Macy's Thanksgiving parade. They always meet over food - burgers and fries, tacos, pizza, etc. - and always ends with some kind of exotic dessert which they share. These are probably minor discrepancies, however they did bother me enough to make an impact on my rating.

I would recommend this to fans of good mysteries and will read more of Ms. Wiehl's Triple Threat novels in the future.

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LibraryThing member NPJacobsen
A nice little mystery ripped from the headlines. Lis Wiehl uses her experiences as a federal prosecutor and television journalist, as well as her father's career as an FBI agent, to create three very different characters all fighting for the same goals.

The book takes place mostly in Portland,
Show More
Oregon. Three women, who had known each other since high school, are re-united after their career paths once again converge. Allison, federal prosecutor, is the only one not to have left Portland. Married and trying to start a family, she seems the most stable of the trio. Firmly grounded in her Christian faith, Allison will not hesitate to turn to her pastor in times of trouble. Cassidy, the television news reporter, has worked her way up from small market news reporter to the mid market Portland news. Always looking for the angle that will be her big break, Cassidy always has a different take on events. Seeming to latch on to the latest new age fad, Cassidy seems to be struggling for acceptance. Nicole, the third in the triple threat club, is a black female FBI agent. She too had left Portland until her career path had re-united her with her friends. An unwed mother, the identity of her daughters father remains a well kept secret. An agnostic, Nicole thinks that both Allison and Cassidy are foolish for placing their faith in non-existent entities.

The mystery, and it is a very good one, starts when Katie Converse, a senate page home in Portland over the Christmas break, takes her dog out for a walk and never returns. The Converse family contacts Cassidy in order to garner publicity to help find their missing daughter. This publicity soon turns nationwide, and Cassidy thinks she has finally received her big break. Nicole has been assigned FBI liaison to the Converse family. Allison, as federal prosecutor, sets up a grand jury to investigate senator Fairview, Katie's sponsor in the page program and number one suspect in her disappearance.

The three meet regularly, just as friends normally will, and inevitably compare notes. They refer to themselves as "Triple Threat," as much for the dessert they share as for their three prong attack on crime. There are other things going on in their lives as well. Allison has been receiving death threats. Cassidy is involved in an abusive relationship, and Nicole finally has a love interest. But all three have an emotional connection to Katie Converse, and she takes center stage in their respective lives during the time the case remains active.

As I said earlier, the mystery was very good. I was a little surprised by the ending, but the clues were mostly present to solve the case. The problem I had with the book, and thus only 4 stars, were the characters. They seemed too stereotypical. The over-achieving television news woman, the double minority FBI agent who has to be twice as good as the next agent, and the firmly grounded federal prosecutor struggling to start a family. My next observation is that all three women should be big enough to float above the Macy's Thanksgiving parade. They always meet over food - burgers and fries, tacos, pizza, etc. - and always ends with some kind of exotic dessert which they share. These are probably minor discrepancies, however they did bother me enough to make an impact on my rating.

I would recommend this to fans of good mysteries and will read more of Ms. Wiehl's Triple Threat novels in the future.

Comment Comment | Permalink
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LibraryThing member NPJacobsen
A nice little mystery ripped from the headlines. Lis Wiehl uses her experiences as a federal prosecutor and television journalist, as well as her father's career as an FBI agent, to create three very different characters all fighting for the same goals.

The book takes place mostly in Portland,
Show More
Oregon. Three women, who had known each other since high school, are re-united after their career paths once again converge. Allison, federal prosecutor, is the only one not to have left Portland. Married and trying to start a family, she seems the most stable of the trio. Firmly grounded in her Christian faith, Allison will not hesitate to turn to her pastor in times of trouble. Cassidy, the television news reporter, has worked her way up from small market news reporter to the mid market Portland news. Always looking for the angle that will be her big break, Cassidy always has a different take on events. Seeming to latch on to the latest new age fad, Cassidy seems to be struggling for acceptance. Nicole, the third in the triple threat club, is a black female FBI agent. She too had left Portland until her career path had re-united her with her friends. An unwed mother, the identity of her daughters father remains a well kept secret. An agnostic, Nicole thinks that both Allison and Cassidy are foolish for placing their faith in non-existent entities.

The mystery, and it is a very good one, starts when Katie Converse, a senate page home in Portland over the Christmas break, takes her dog out for a walk and never returns. The Converse family contacts Cassidy in order to garner publicity to help find their missing daughter. This publicity soon turns nationwide, and Cassidy thinks she has finally received her big break. Nicole has been assigned FBI liaison to the Converse family. Allison, as federal prosecutor, sets up a grand jury to investigate senator Fairview, Katie's sponsor in the page program and number one suspect in her disappearance.

The three meet regularly, just as friends normally will, and inevitably compare notes. They refer to themselves as "Triple Threat," as much for the dessert they share as for their three prong attack on crime. There are other things going on in their lives as well. Allison has been receiving death threats. Cassidy is involved in an abusive relationship, and Nicole finally has a love interest. But all three have an emotional connection to Katie Converse, and she takes center stage in their respective lives during the time the case remains active.

As I said earlier, the mystery was very good. I was a little surprised by the ending, but the clues were mostly present to solve the case. The problem I had with the book, and thus only 4 stars, were the characters. They seemed too stereotypical. The over-achieving television news woman, the double minority FBI agent who has to be twice as good as the next agent, and the firmly grounded federal prosecutor struggling to start a family. My next observation is that all three women should be big enough to float above the Macy's Thanksgiving parade. They always meet over food - burgers and fries, tacos, pizza, etc. - and always ends with some kind of exotic dessert which they share. These are probably minor discrepancies, however they did bother me enough to make an impact on my rating.

I would recommend this to fans of good mysteries and will read more of Ms. Wiehl's Triple Threat novels in the future.

Comment Comment | Permalink
Show Less
LibraryThing member NPJacobsen
A nice little mystery ripped from the headlines. Lis Wiehl uses her experiences as a federal prosecutor and television journalist, as well as her father's career as an FBI agent, to create three very different characters all fighting for the same goals.

The book takes place mostly in Portland,
Show More
Oregon. Three women, who had known each other since high school, are re-united after their career paths once again converge. Allison, federal prosecutor, is the only one not to have left Portland. Married and trying to start a family, she seems the most stable of the trio. Firmly grounded in her Christian faith, Allison will not hesitate to turn to her pastor in times of trouble. Cassidy, the television news reporter, has worked her way up from small market news reporter to the mid market Portland news. Always looking for the angle that will be her big break, Cassidy always has a different take on events. Seeming to latch on to the latest new age fad, Cassidy seems to be struggling for acceptance. Nicole, the third in the triple threat club, is a black female FBI agent. She too had left Portland until her career path had re-united her with her friends. An unwed mother, the identity of her daughters father remains a well kept secret. An agnostic, Nicole thinks that both Allison and Cassidy are foolish for placing their faith in non-existent entities.

The mystery, and it is a very good one, starts when Katie Converse, a senate page home in Portland over the Christmas break, takes her dog out for a walk and never returns. The Converse family contacts Cassidy in order to garner publicity to help find their missing daughter. This publicity soon turns nationwide, and Cassidy thinks she has finally received her big break. Nicole has been assigned FBI liaison to the Converse family. Allison, as federal prosecutor, sets up a grand jury to investigate senator Fairview, Katie's sponsor in the page program and number one suspect in her disappearance.

The three meet regularly, just as friends normally will, and inevitably compare notes. They refer to themselves as "Triple Threat," as much for the dessert they share as for their three prong attack on crime. There are other things going on in their lives as well. Allison has been receiving death threats. Cassidy is involved in an abusive relationship, and Nicole finally has a love interest. But all three have an emotional connection to Katie Converse, and she takes center stage in their respective lives during the time the case remains active.

As I said earlier, the mystery was very good. I was a little surprised by the ending, but the clues were mostly present to solve the case. The problem I had with the book, and thus only 4 stars, were the characters. They seemed too stereotypical. The over-achieving television news woman, the double minority FBI agent who has to be twice as good as the next agent, and the firmly grounded federal prosecutor struggling to start a family. My next observation is that all three women should be big enough to float above the Macy's Thanksgiving parade. They always meet over food - burgers and fries, tacos, pizza, etc. - and always ends with some kind of exotic dessert which they share. These are probably minor discrepancies, however they did bother me enough to make an impact on my rating.

I would recommend this to fans of good mysteries and will read more of Ms. Wiehl's Triple Threat novels in the future.

Comment Comment | Permalink
Show Less
LibraryThing member NPJacobsen
A nice little mystery ripped from the headlines. Lis Wiehl uses her experiences as a federal prosecutor and television journalist, as well as her father's career as an FBI agent, to create three very different characters all fighting for the same goals.

The book takes place mostly in Portland,
Show More
Oregon. Three women, who had known each other since high school, are re-united after their career paths once again converge. Allison, federal prosecutor, is the only one not to have left Portland. Married and trying to start a family, she seems the most stable of the trio. Firmly grounded in her Christian faith, Allison will not hesitate to turn to her pastor in times of trouble. Cassidy, the television news reporter, has worked her way up from small market news reporter to the mid market Portland news. Always looking for the angle that will be her big break, Cassidy always has a different take on events. Seeming to latch on to the latest new age fad, Cassidy seems to be struggling for acceptance. Nicole, the third in the triple threat club, is a black female FBI agent. She too had left Portland until her career path had re-united her with her friends. An unwed mother, the identity of her daughters father remains a well kept secret. An agnostic, Nicole thinks that both Allison and Cassidy are foolish for placing their faith in non-existent entities.

The mystery, and it is a very good one, starts when Katie Converse, a senate page home in Portland over the Christmas break, takes her dog out for a walk and never returns. The Converse family contacts Cassidy in order to garner publicity to help find their missing daughter. This publicity soon turns nationwide, and Cassidy thinks she has finally received her big break. Nicole has been assigned FBI liaison to the Converse family. Allison, as federal prosecutor, sets up a grand jury to investigate senator Fairview, Katie's sponsor in the page program and number one suspect in her disappearance.

The three meet regularly, just as friends normally will, and inevitably compare notes. They refer to themselves as "Triple Threat," as much for the dessert they share as for their three prong attack on crime. There are other things going on in their lives as well. Allison has been receiving death threats. Cassidy is involved in an abusive relationship, and Nicole finally has a love interest. But all three have an emotional connection to Katie Converse, and she takes center stage in their respective lives during the time the case remains active.

As I said earlier, the mystery was very good. I was a little surprised by the ending, but the clues were mostly present to solve the case. The problem I had with the book, and thus only 4 stars, were the characters. They seemed too stereotypical. The over-achieving television news woman, the double minority FBI agent who has to be twice as good as the next agent, and the firmly grounded federal prosecutor struggling to start a family. My next observation is that all three women should be big enough to float above the Macy's Thanksgiving parade. They always meet over food - burgers and fries, tacos, pizza, etc. - and always ends with some kind of exotic dessert which they share. These are probably minor discrepancies, however they did bother me enough to make an impact on my rating.

I would recommend this to fans of good mysteries and will read more of Ms. Wiehl's Triple Threat novels in the future.

Comment Comment | Permalink
Show Less
LibraryThing member NPJacobsen
A nice little mystery ripped from the headlines. Lis Wiehl uses her experiences as a federal prosecutor and television journalist, as well as her father's career as an FBI agent, to create three very different characters all fighting for the same goals.

The book takes place mostly in Portland,
Show More
Oregon. Three women, who had known each other since high school, are re-united after their career paths once again converge. Allison, federal prosecutor, is the only one not to have left Portland. Married and trying to start a family, she seems the most stable of the trio. Firmly grounded in her Christian faith, Allison will not hesitate to turn to her pastor in times of trouble. Cassidy, the television news reporter, has worked her way up from small market news reporter to the mid market Portland news. Always looking for the angle that will be her big break, Cassidy always has a different take on events. Seeming to latch on to the latest new age fad, Cassidy seems to be struggling for acceptance. Nicole, the third in the triple threat club, is a black female FBI agent. She too had left Portland until her career path had re-united her with her friends. An unwed mother, the identity of her daughters father remains a well kept secret. An agnostic, Nicole thinks that both Allison and Cassidy are foolish for placing their faith in non-existent entities.

The mystery, and it is a very good one, starts when Katie Converse, a senate page home in Portland over the Christmas break, takes her dog out for a walk and never returns. The Converse family contacts Cassidy in order to garner publicity to help find their missing daughter. This publicity soon turns nationwide, and Cassidy thinks she has finally received her big break. Nicole has been assigned FBI liaison to the Converse family. Allison, as federal prosecutor, sets up a grand jury to investigate senator Fairview, Katie's sponsor in the page program and number one suspect in her disappearance.

The three meet regularly, just as friends normally will, and inevitably compare notes. They refer to themselves as "Triple Threat," as much for the dessert they share as for their three prong attack on crime. There are other things going on in their lives as well. Allison has been receiving death threats. Cassidy is involved in an abusive relationship, and Nicole finally has a love interest. But all three have an emotional connection to Katie Converse, and she takes center stage in their respective lives during the time the case remains active.

As I said earlier, the mystery was very good. I was a little surprised by the ending, but the clues were mostly present to solve the case. The problem I had with the book, and thus only 4 stars, were the characters. They seemed too stereotypical. The over-achieving television news woman, the double minority FBI agent who has to be twice as good as the next agent, and the firmly grounded federal prosecutor struggling to start a family. My next observation is that all three women should be big enough to float above the Macy's Thanksgiving parade. They always meet over food - burgers and fries, tacos, pizza, etc. - and always ends with some kind of exotic dessert which they share. These are probably minor discrepancies, however they did bother me enough to make an impact on my rating.

I would recommend this to fans of good mysteries and will read more of Ms. Wiehl's Triple Threat novels in the future.

Comment Comment | Permalink
Show Less
LibraryThing member NPJacobsen
A nice little mystery ripped from the headlines. Lis Wiehl uses her experiences as a federal prosecutor and television journalist, as well as her father's career as an FBI agent, to create three very different characters all fighting for the same goals.

The book takes place mostly in Portland,
Show More
Oregon. Three women, who had known each other since high school, are re-united after their career paths once again converge. Allison, federal prosecutor, is the only one not to have left Portland. Married and trying to start a family, she seems the most stable of the trio. Firmly grounded in her Christian faith, Allison will not hesitate to turn to her pastor in times of trouble. Cassidy, the television news reporter, has worked her way up from small market news reporter to the mid market Portland news. Always looking for the angle that will be her big break, Cassidy always has a different take on events. Seeming to latch on to the latest new age fad, Cassidy seems to be struggling for acceptance. Nicole, the third in the triple threat club, is a black female FBI agent. She too had left Portland until her career path had re-united her with her friends. An unwed mother, the identity of her daughters father remains a well kept secret. An agnostic, Nicole thinks that both Allison and Cassidy are foolish for placing their faith in non-existent entities.

The mystery, and it is a very good one, starts when Katie Converse, a senate page home in Portland over the Christmas break, takes her dog out for a walk and never returns. The Converse family contacts Cassidy in order to garner publicity to help find their missing daughter. This publicity soon turns nationwide, and Cassidy thinks she has finally received her big break. Nicole has been assigned FBI liaison to the Converse family. Allison, as federal prosecutor, sets up a grand jury to investigate senator Fairview, Katie's sponsor in the page program and number one suspect in her disappearance.

The three meet regularly, just as friends normally will, and inevitably compare notes. They refer to themselves as "Triple Threat," as much for the dessert they share as for their three prong attack on crime. There are other things going on in their lives as well. Allison has been receiving death threats. Cassidy is involved in an abusive relationship, and Nicole finally has a love interest. But all three have an emotional connection to Katie Converse, and she takes center stage in their respective lives during the time the case remains active.

As I said earlier, the mystery was very good. I was a little surprised by the ending, but the clues were mostly present to solve the case. The problem I had with the book, and thus only 4 stars, were the characters. They seemed too stereotypical. The over-achieving television news woman, the double minority FBI agent who has to be twice as good as the next agent, and the firmly grounded federal prosecutor struggling to start a family. My next observation is that all three women should be big enough to float above the Macy's Thanksgiving parade. They always meet over food - burgers and fries, tacos, pizza, etc. - and always ends with some kind of exotic dessert which they share. These are probably minor discrepancies, however they did bother me enough to make an impact on my rating.

I would recommend this to fans of good mysteries and will read more of Ms. Wiehl's Triple Threat novels in the future.

Comment Comment | Permalink
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