Look to the Hills: The Diary of Lozette Moreau, a French Slave Girl, New York Colony 1763 (Dear America Series)

by Patricia C. McKissack

Hardcover, 2004

Status

Check shelf

Call number

J DA 1763 NY

Publication

Scholastic Inc. (2004), 190 pages

Description

Brought up in France as the African slave companion of a nobleman's daughter, thirteen-year-old Zettie records the events of 1763, when she and her mistress escape to the New World where they are inadvertently drawn into the hostilities of the ongoing French and Indian War and, eventually, find a new direction to their lives.

Local notes

1907-031

User reviews

LibraryThing member t1bclasslibrary
This book offers a different perspective on slavery- it compares slavery in America to that in France. Though slavery in France is less cruel, the main character, Lozette, makes it clear that being free is important, regardless of the conditions. I found the story interesting and the character
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relateable.
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LibraryThing member hgcslibrary
Brought up in France as the African slave companion of a nobleman's daughter, 13 year-old Zettie records the events of 1763 when she and her mistress escape to the New World where they are inadvertently drawn into the hostilities fo the ongoing French and Indian war.
LibraryThing member countrylife
Part of the Dear America series, Look to the Hills: The Diary of Lozette Moreau, a French Slave Girl (New York Colony, 1763) is written at a child's level, but full of the scholarship that author Patricia C. McKissack brings to her work. This story follows Lozette (Zettie), born on a slave ship as
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her mother dies, to a brief stay at a convent, then being sold as a companion to a young girl in France, where she lives on friendly terms with her mistress, Marie-Louise Boyer (Ree). Ree's oldest brother joins the military and is presumed dead in America, which news precipitates her father's death. Her next brother then squanders the family fortunes and sells everything to stay out of debtor's prison. Ree escapes with Zettie to America.

There is a good history and geography lesson here about Cape Breton Island, the great lakes, the New York wilderness, and Indian relations with the different Europeans. A “Historical Notes” section at the end, shows pictures of maps, slave ships, and the real persons depicted in this story.

A sample: That need to be free is a force that draws people to this land. It goes beyond being French, English, Dutch, Spanish, man, woman, rich, poor, slave, or free. I can feel the energy of that yearning all around me in the colonists, the trappers, the soldiers.

Very nicely done. 3.6 stars
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LibraryThing member Keiffer
"Freedom is the source of our happiness."

"Look to the Hills. The Diary of Lozette Moreau, a French Slave Girl," tells of the year in the life of French Slave (Companion) who transported from the one home she has ever known to a new world toward the end of the French and Indian War. There Zettie
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(nicname everyone called her) is faced with new landscapes, new people, and new laws especially those governing slavery. Being a companion (a fancy word for slave) had it's advantages such as being taught how to read and write. (Companions were often hired to look after the daughters of Aristocrats until marriage of said daughter.) Zettie tells of being sold & transported from person to person like property. At one point she brought like property by British soliders and from there need to consider if her loyalty lie with the British who fought along side the Indians or the French, where she was a citizen of.
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LibraryThing member reader1009
Children's fiction; historical. This diary follows the travels and thoughts of a French girl's companion slave; Lozette and her "owner" Marie-Louise escape the clutches of M.'s would-be husband and embark on an adventure (or at least a very long journey) that will end with them finding M's brother
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(a captive of the English during the French and Indian war), M. getting married to someone she actually likes, and L. being granted her freedom. I read the first 50 pages or so then started skimming, then gave up. The writing is somewhat decent but the characters/plot need more development.
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Language

Original language

English

Original publication date

2004-04

Physical description

190 p.; 5.5 inches

ISBN

9780439210386

Barcode

34747000075347

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