So You Want to be an Inventor

by Judith St. George

Other authorsDavid Small (Illustrator)
Paperback, 2002

Status

Check shelf

Call number

J 608 ST

Publication

Scholastic (2002)

Description

Presents some of the characteristics of inventors by describing the inventions of people such as Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Edison, and Eli Whitney.

Local notes

1504-193

User reviews

LibraryThing member sharmon05
This book provides the reader with a lot of accurate historical information, this makes this book a good example of an informative book. The illustrations in this book are very bright and engaging. They help tell the story and give students an idea about the time and the invention.
LibraryThing member ggenao
this is a good book to talk about invention and inventors and how they are part of our history and improvement in the society
LibraryThing member LDB2009
Inventors and their inventions make this a great read for students. Famous, important inventions are mentioned...but so are many obscure inventions and ideas. The stories about the inventors and inventions bring out the struggles most had as they often spent years trying to bring their ideas to the
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masses. Inventors highlighted in the book include the usual references to Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Graham Bell, and Thomas Edison, but the list also includes inventors from all over the world...as well as a few women inventors. The illustrations are excellent and while some bring attention to the importance of the inventions, other drawings focus on the frivolity and lighter side of the designs.
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LibraryThing member awiltenburg
Excellent! Excellent! Excellent! This book is loaded with inventions that work and some that dont. Each is presented in a humor style, an easy to read format with terrific illustrations! This book would be an excellent read aloud for grades 2-8. I would use it to introduce science concepts,
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invention, historical commentary, to foster creativity, perseverance, personal best. Some topics covered are the transistor, coffins, x-rays, computers, filament, airplanes, brakes, movie camera, phone, rubber tires, etc..... You name it, its probably in there! This book is wonderful!! Grades 2-8
CAUTION: guiillotine
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LibraryThing member YouthGPL
Kearsten says: I checked this out to listen to in the car with my daughter (6 1/2 yrs old), partly because of the invention/inventor aspect, but also because the illustrator is David Small and I quite adore his illustrations!

So You Want to Be an Inventor describes the sorts of characteristics that
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are beneficial to inventors by using those characteristics to describe inventors in the past. For example, "Don't worry if people laugh at you" precedes Robert Fulton's initially laughed at steamboat, and presumed hoaxer Robert Goddard, who invented a liquid-fuel rocket in 1926.

I found this interesting and fun (the audio was well-done and expressive), and my daughter requested we listen to the 30-minute audio several times (and would then discourse on all her inventive ideas!). She read along with the book, but for younger kids, there is a second CD which includes an audio track with page-turn signals. (There are also biographical notes on all the inventors mentioned - 40 in all - and a bibliography.)

Highly recommended!
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LibraryThing member kayceel
I checked this out to listen to in the car with my daughter (6 1/2), partly because of the invention/inventor aspect, but also because the illustrator is David Small and I quite adore his illustrations!

So You Want to be an Inventor describes the sorts of characteristics that are beneficial to
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inventors by using those characteristics to describe inventors in the past. For example, "Don't worry if people laugh at you" precedes Robert Fulton's initially laughed at steamboat and presumed hoaxer Robert Goddard, who invented a liquid-fuel rocket, in 1926.

I found this interesting and fun (the audio was well-done and expressive), and my daughter requested we listen to the 30-minute audio several times (and would then discourse on all her inventive ideas!). She read along with the book, but for younger kids, there is a CD which includes an audio track with page-turn signals. (There are also biographical notes on all the inventors mentioned - 40 in all - and a bibliography.)

Highly recommended!
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LibraryThing member bperkins07
Genre: This book is informational. It provides information and history about many famous and not so famous inventors. The purpose of the book is to provide information on what it takes to be an inventor, and what to expect.

Stars: Style
LibraryThing member kaitlinc23
Genre: Informational :History
Level: Primary 3-5

This book is a good example of informational because it focuses on history and inventors. The book gives information about famous inventors and lets kids know that they are able to be inventors just the way they are. It tells of people who invented
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things what we use everyday such electricity, rubber, and the dishwasher. It sends a positive message to all kids that they do not have to have anything special to be an inventor.
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LibraryThing member mlucas09
Summary: This book gives an overview of many different inventors throughout history including Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Graham Bell, and not as commonly known people such as Josephine Cochran, who invented the dishwasher. Each page gives a brief story of who the person was and what it is that
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they invented.
Critique:
Genre: This is a good example of an informational book because it tells stories, in a kid friendly way, about famous people in history who have invented popular items. It is informational because all of the facts are true to history and the reader can learn a lot about the different people in the book. Also, at the end of the book, there is more biographical information about all of the inventors included in the story.
Characterization: Each of the characters are equally flat characters because we only get one page of information about each of them. There is no dominant character in the story at all, it is equally distributed between all of the characters. The development of each character also develops rather rapidly and is then concluded quickly as well.
Media: Ink, Watercolor, and Pastel Chalk
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LibraryThing member tracyhintz
Good informational text of a collection of inventors and how they were inspired to invent what they did.

J. St George has been making the arounds to the Children Book Fairs... 10/2012
LibraryThing member ckelly16
So You Want to Be an Inventor is a great book for children grades three to five. It is all about famous inventions and inventors that you may never have thought about. I liked this book for two reasons and the first is its informational aspect. The book is a clear example of an informational text
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but is exciting and relatable. Each page tells the story of a different set of inventions and who invented the, but relates it back to the reader by asking a question or making a point. An example of this would be on the first page when the author asks, “Are you a kid who likes to tinker with machines that clink and clank, levers that pull, bells that ring, cogs that grind, switches that turn on and off, wires that vibrate, dials that spin?” The writing is both engaging and pulls the reader in to want to read more. The book also includes a biographical index in the back that explains each inventor. Another reason I liked the book was because of its fun illustrations. The pictures are very bright and engaging, along with humorous. The inventors are drawn very silly but allow readers to become interested and understanding of the story. Overall, the big idea of the book is to inform readers about famous inventors and their inventions in a fun way.
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LibraryThing member SMLawrence
This is a book that educates children on famous inventions and inventors and encourages them to invent things themselves. It tells about famous inventors like Thomas Edison, Benjamin Franklin, Henry Ford and also tells about not as well known inventors like Cyrus McCormick, who invented the
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mechanical wheat reaper, and female inventor Josephine Cochran, who invented the first dishwasher. I particularly enjoyed this book because it included female inventors, not just male inventors!
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LibraryThing member ebecker13
Informational book about inventors and their inventions throughout history.
LibraryThing member Nicholepeterse
This book is a great book that describes investors to the reader. It really goes deep into history and mentions Ben Franklin, and goes up to the year 1947 with the invention of computers. It has a lot of history going on in the book and mentions a lot of important information. It also mentions
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common traits among investors.

Use: I would use it for a history lesson about a certain area and pull out chunks from the book. Second I would use it to inspire kids to be creative and do a writing assignment on what they would like to invent.
Media: Colored pencil
Genre: Informational
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LibraryThing member sommerkirk
This book was about many well known inventors such as Thomas Edison, Eli Whitney, and Josephine Cochran. I thought this would be an amazing way to not only cross cut concepts with science and English, but also with history and Engineering. I would love to read this book and then have my students
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actually invent something that solves a problem. I LOVE READING SCIENCE BOOKS! They get me so excited to teach science all the time and integrate all of the other core subjects.
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Awards

Grand Canyon Reader Award (Nominee — Nonfiction — 2007)
Read Aloud Indiana Book Award (Intermediate — 2005)

ISBN

0439575893 / 9780439575898

Barcode

34747000061529
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