The Star of Kazan

by Eva Ibbotson

Hardcover, 2004

Status

Available

Local notes

Fic Ibb

Barcode

269

Collection

Publication

Dutton Juvenile (2004), Edition: First Edition, 405 pages

Description

After twelve-year-old Annika, a foundling living in late nineteenth-century Vienna, inherits a trunk of costume jewelry, a woman claiming to be her aristocratic mother arrives and takes her to live in a strangely decrepit mansion in Germany.

Original language

English

Original publication date

2004

Physical description

405 p.; 5.84 inches

Media reviews

Kirkus
Kirkus (Kirkus Reviews, September 15, 2004 (Vol. 72, No. 18)) Ibbotson, master of the "poor orphan makes good" tale, offers another eminently satisfying example, this one wrapped in a valentine to Vienna, the author's natal city. Raised by servants to be "a person who was interested in doing
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things, not having them," 11-or-so-year-old foundling Annika sees a dream come true when lovely, regal Edeltraut von Tannenberg appears at the door one day, joyously announcing that she's her real mother. Blinded by adoration, Annika barely notices how badly in need of repairs is her fortress-like new home, or how poorly she fits in with her spoiled and predatory new "family." Readers will, though, as piece by piece, the author reveals an elaborate, clever fraud involving faked documents, smoothly plausible lies, and a hoard of supposedly imitation jewelry that Annika has inherited from an elderly neighbor. Creating suspense by letting readers into the scheme long before Annika and her friends, Ibbotson also paints a vivid picture of pre-WWI Vienna, from its delectable pastries to the famed show horses of the Spanish Riding School. Along with this beguiling atmosphere and expertly developed plot, readers will long remember the admirable Annika and cheer her eventual, well-deserved, triumph. Illustrations not seen. 2004, Dutton, 336p, $16.99. Category: Fiction. Ages 10 to 13. Starred Review. © 2004 Kirkus Reviews/VNU eMedia, Inc. All rights reserved.
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User reviews

LibraryThing member jennybeast
It's a very Eva Ibbotson book -- very Vienna focused, very idyllic childhood (poor but happy), very idealized main character (so saintly, that girl). The audio book is well read, so I enjoyed it. If it was the first Eva Ibbotson book I had read, I would have probably loved it's fairy-tale
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predictability and idealistic world view. As it is, I found it dragged in detail and plot. You know it's all going to turn out for the best, but first we must agonize through all the hoops of sorrow and stress.

However, the characters are wonderful (well, Annika is a little too saintly), but the people in the square where she grows up are a hilarious cast of eccentrics. On the whole, good times, but doesn't have enough to it to re-read with pleasure.
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LibraryThing member bookwren
I love this book! It makes me want to visit Vienna and Austria, even though I realize much has changed since this book was set in 1908. Still, I want to see the Lipizzaner horses perform in the Spanish Riding School and eat luscious Austrian pastries, walk in the Alps amid the flowers, and watch
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for birds. Annika and her family and friends are inspiring in their work ethic and kindness. This is my (at least) second reading of this novel and I love it even more. Includes a map of the German Empire and Austria-Hungary in 1908.
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LibraryThing member sokkr
The genius inside of Eva Ibbotson is unimaginable. She livens the story by a mile
LibraryThing member bookenthusiast100
The story on an orphan girl in Vienna in the 1940's. A great description on the city and the zeitgeist. Reminds me of such older girlie books as Ann of Green Gables or Emily of New moon.
LibraryThing member scherervms
I really liked this book.
I felt the person who had written this book had a lot of imagination.
I bet a lot of people liked it.
Its about a girl who dreams what she draws with a special pencil.
But she is not the only one.
LibraryThing member Laurencita
a different genre for ibbotson. loved it.
LibraryThing member beth123
Anika has always dreamed of having a real mother, but when a rich aristercrat clams to be her mother Anika thinks everything will be ok but then mysteries of the past unfold and Anika finds herself in danger!
LibraryThing member ccagney
Annika was found by two ladies named Ellie and Sigrid. The star of Kazan is a jewel that an old lady left her in her will.
LibraryThing member bmlg
In Vienna, in 1908, Annika, a foundling girl raised in a professorial household, is almost entirely happy helping her foster-mother (the servant who found her) cope with the eccentric professors, playing with her friends in the streets and gardens, listening to the stories of the old lady who was
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once the celebrated performer La Rondine, and admiring the breathtaking Lipizzaner horses. She only dreams a little of her birth-mother appearing and sweeping her away--until the day her mother does. Annika is swept away to her aristocratic, ancestral home. But why does her noble family live such an austere, scrimping life? Why is the gypsy boy Zed so angry at them? And why are they so interested in the costume jewelry that La Rondine left to her?
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LibraryThing member thesmellofbooks
Such a lively, alive, wonderful book!
LibraryThing member Bduke
I do love my Eva Ibbotson! This book was very much in her mold. It is one of her children's books, but reminded me a lot of her books for adults, being set in Vienna with a heroine who is so good and loyal. You definitely cheer for Annika and her loved ones, and want to get even with her enemies.
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The plot isn't very surprising, you'll guess what is going on quite early, but the way the author gets us there is fun. The characters are all well formed and the settings and descriptions are vintage Ibbotson. This is probably my second favorite of her children's books. It will be hard for anything to beat Journey to the River Sea.
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LibraryThing member charlie68
Good for kids of all ages. About a foundling who is adopted by some professors only to have her mother appear again under mysterious circumstances.
LibraryThing member ewyatt
I listened to this book and enjoyed the story of Annika. I knew something was fishy about her "mother."
LibraryThing member abbylibrarian
Annika has never celebrated a birthday. Instead, she celebrates her Found Day, which is the day she was found by Ellie and Sigrid and taken to live in the professors' house in Vienna. All her life, Annika has dreamed that her mother would come and find her and in her dreams, her mother is a fine
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lady. When Annika's mother actually shows up, she does not disappoint. She's dressed in the finest clothes and takes Annika out to a meal at the finest restaurant in town. Then she takes Annika with her back to Spittal, her ancestral home. From the moment Annika arrives, she senses that things are not quite right. There are paintings missing from the walls, the house is freezing, and the expensive vase that was in her room one day is gone the next. Then one happy day her mother comes back from a trip to Switzerland with the news that her godfather has passed away and left her a fortune. Annika thinks that Spittal is saved... but there's much she has yet to find out and it just might cost her everything to figure out the truth.

I think I loved this book because of the characters. Annika is a great character, very spunky and likeable, and she is supported by a varied cast of friends (and enemies). However, you can never truly be sure of who to trust. Things twist around and the story takes many turns. If you're looking for a great, sprawling story with a twisty plot and great characters, I recommend The Star of Kazan.
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LibraryThing member lkmuir
After twelve-year-old Annika, a foundling living in late nineteenth-century Vienna, inherits a trunk of costume jewelry, a woman claiming to be her aristocratic mother arrives and takes her to live in a strangely decrepit mansion in Germany.
LibraryThing member Salsabrarian
Narrated by Patricia Connolly. **SPOILER**
In early 1900s Vienna, Annika lives with the professors and is raised by their house staff, Ellie and Sigrid, who took Annika in when she was found abandoned as a baby. Annika is a bright, well-liked child who loves Ellie and Sigrid but occasionally
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fantasizes about a reunion with her mother, whom she imagines to be elegant and loving. Annika inherits a trunk of jewelry from an elderly friend and shortly thereafter, Annika's long lost mother appears to claim her. Edeltraut von Tannenberg is elegant and loving and is royalty to boot. But the estate on which she lives is in a state of disrepair; she promises Annika that things will change very soon. The trusting Annika believes her until a series of events prove Edeltraut has been selling Annika's inherited jewelry to save the estate, and is actually not her mother.
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LibraryThing member kat12may
Love the story!
LibraryThing member Austrianprincess
Great adventure-Defintely recommend it!
LibraryThing member M.Akter.Tonima
read it through...reading it made me depressed due to its characters lack of humanity.even though made me re realize how inhuman human can be.
finishing the novel on the other hand made me feel fine eventually.
LibraryThing member M.Akter.Tonima
read it through...reading it made me depressed due to its characters lack of humanity.even though made me re realize how inhuman human can be.
finishing the novel on the other hand made me feel fine eventually.
LibraryThing member DeltaQueen50
Star of Kazan by Eva Ibbotson is a children’s story about a young orphan who, abandoned at birth, goes through a series of adventures in order to find out where she truly belongs. I am a fan of this author and this book has become one of my favorites by her.

Set in Vienna, the city is an important
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part of the story and the author obviously knows and loves this city as it is brought to life through her descriptions. Annika, the abandoned baby, grows up in the care of a cook and housekeeper, but her family also includes the three professors that the servants work for, and indeed, many of the surrounding neighbours. Although a very happy child, she nevertheless dreams of her mother coming to find her. Her life takes a drastic turn when one day a regal looking woman comes knocking and claims Annika is her long lost daughter.

This is a timeless story that would appeal to the young at heart of all ages with it’s clever plot revolving around Annika’s heritage. Being a children’s story, all ends are neatly tied up by the end of the book but with it’s pre-WWI setting of Vienna and engaging characters, The Star of Kazan is a satisfying, feel good story for all ages.
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LibraryThing member wrightja2000
The first quarter is a bit slow and the mystery was predictable. But a good read for advanced elementary readers with no violence or bad language, or mature subject matter.
(For those who are selective about content for their kids, an old lady at the beginning talks about going to live with a man
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and doesn't marry him but that one sentence is all it says about it.)
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LibraryThing member RobertaLea
I do enjoy a good foundling/rags to riches story -- but the title really didn't go well with the book's story.
LibraryThing member lkmuir
After twelve-year-old Annika, a foundling living in late nineteenth-century Vienna, inherits a trunk of costume jewelry, a woman claiming to be her aristocratic mother arrives and takes her to live in a strangely decrepit mansion in Germany.
LibraryThing member katie1802
Best of a bad lot, I'm not even bothered reviewing it, how sad is that?

Pages

405

Rating

½ (267 ratings; 3.9)
Page: 2.1088 seconds