The barrow will send what it may

by Margaret Killjoy

Other authorsMargaret Killjoy
Paper Book, 2018

Description

Margaret Killjoy's Danielle Cain series is a dropkick-in-the-mouth anarcho-punk fantasy that pits traveling anarchist Danielle Cain against eternal spirits, hypocritical ideologues, and brutal, unfeeling officers of the law. The story continues with The Barrow Will Send What it May. Now a nascent demon-hunting crew on the lam, Danielle and her friends arrive in a small town that contains a secret occult library run by anarchists and residents who claim to have come back from the dead. When Danielle and her crew investigate, they are put directly in the crosshairs of a necromancer's wrath -- whose actions threaten to trigger the apocalypse itself.

Status

Available

Call number

FICTION SCI FIC

Publication

New York, NY : Tor.com, 2018.

Media reviews

"Killjoy creates a multifaceted magic without burdening the text with needless exposition, intertwining the human and magical elements in a tale that captures the depth of humankind’s endless grappling with the everpresent specter of death."

User reviews

LibraryThing member greeniezona
Apparently I am getting over my resistance to series, because here I am, reading Danielle Cain book #2 even after I didn't know that The Lamb Will Slaughter the Lion was the first book in a series until the end. But I am now in it for the long haul -- as Danielle and her friends are like a queer,
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punk, post-crash version of Trixie Belden and her pals -- snooping around small Western towns and solving weird mysteries -- only those mysteries turn up necromancers and obscure magical spellbooks. Plus, I mean, an anarchist commune takes over, lives in, and runs a library in a town that just accepts them, because why not? How could any reader not love that?

Plus we get to talk about feelings and crushes and consent and boundaries on the way. I can't wait to see what's next for this bunch.
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LibraryThing member bookczuk
After I devoured The Lamb Will Slaughter the Lion I was really excited to read another novella by Margaret Killjoy, featuring the punk, queer, homeless, anarchist Danielle Cain, fresh on the road with companions from Freedom, Iowa. They're headed out into the world with the loose idea of fighting
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demons. Their journey takes them to a small town things are not exactly right. For starters, there are a couple of people who have returned from the dead, and occultists running the library. As with the first in this series, I really enjoyed Killjoy's style, and am hoping for more in this series.

I received this copy courtesy of Tor Books, as part of a care package to to keep me from going stir crazy while healing from a broken patella. It made falling and breaking myself almost worth it.
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LibraryThing member kthxy
Oooh I like this. Has everything that I liked about the first one, but the characters felt more fluffy and close to me in this one, so I got sucked in more. Yay yay yay.
LibraryThing member eldang
A great continuation of Danielle Cain's story, which fleshes some of the supporting characters out nicely and expands on the ideas. It pushes the fantasy element a lot further, and I didn't quite feel that it could sustain that all the way.
LibraryThing member eldang
A great continuation of Danielle Cain's story, which fleshes some of the supporting characters out nicely and expands on the ideas. It pushes the fantasy element a lot further, and I didn't quite feel that it could sustain that all the way.
LibraryThing member james.d.gifford
I read the first book in the series in a single sitting. This one is only slightly longer, but I had too many things distracting me, and it took longer – I think it would be better read at a quick pace since the the forward movement of the plot keeps the more serious elements recognizably brief,
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and I tended to ponder on them because of my slower pace. Killjoy has a quick moving narrative and a good voice for the narrator that keeps the reader engaged. I like this a lot.

What's a bit more fluid in the second volume is how she blends in anarchist concepts and the challenges of anarchist organization (or really any kind of social interaction that grants other people their independence) but never in an overtly didactic way. There's skill in this. They're both clearly didactic novels that avoid straying into explicit moralizing. In a sense this is their anarchist praxis (apart from the themes in the plot): the reader is invited to develop an understanding or interpretation rather than be told one. We also see Danielle rethinking her ideas and feelings more frequently in this volume, like having a natural response of anger or looking for an expedient solution, then rethinking her impulses ethically and rationally. That's almost a modelling good behavior for the reader, except I don't have the impression the outcome is fixed or predetermined so much as it's a modelling of good practice.

I'm already waiting for book #3…
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Awards

Lambda Literary Award (Finalist — 2019)

Language

Original publication date

2018

ISBN

0765397382 / 9780765397386
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