We've Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children's March (Jane Addams Award Book (Awards))

by Cynthia Levinson

Hardcover, 2012

Status

Check shelf

Call number

J 323.1 Le

Publication

Peachtree Publishers (2012), Edition: Third Edition, Hardcover, 176 pages

Description

Discusses the events of the 4,000 African American students who marched to jail to secure their freedom in May 1963.

Local notes

1409-027

User reviews

LibraryThing member RebeccaGraf
History is full of untold stories or stories that you hear about and quickly dismiss because they are not 'big' enough to dwell on. Cynthia Levinson takes you to one segment of American history in We've Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children's March where she reveals the battle of desegregation,
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racism, and prejudice not only with the big leaders like King but also with the young children of Birmingham, Alabama.

The tension between groups in the 1960s over where the blacks should and should not be within society was not minor nor light. It was huge with many people dying. Churches and homes were bombed. People where killed just for expressing their beliefs that a black child should be able to get the same education in the same building as a white child. Most protestors were adults. They were led by such leaders as Martin Luther King, Jr., but there were also the teenagers and children who were affected. They were the ones used as test subjects by their parents and others in the fight for education. Many tried to avoid the protests until they realized that they could make a difference. From that point on, the young children of Birmingham stepped forward and willing went to jail.

This book covers not just the protests but what led up to them. It singles out several young people from all walks of life who eventually came together to stand as one. This is one of the best features of this book. It was not just a book about protests. It was a personal look at those same young people who risked everything. Though King and others were mentioned, they were not the focus. The average person was. By doing this, Ms. Levinson made it more real and gave the time period much more depth than what you typically receive studying the 60s.

There are many pictures of events and of the actual people who tell their stories. As you read, you see the protests, the arrests, and even the peace trainings. I am a very visual person, and this enhanced the reading experience.

If you are studying the 1960s, African American history, or just want to learn more, I highly recommend this book. It is a great read and goes beyond what others give you. It gives you the hearts behind the movements.

Note: I was provided a copy of this book by the publisher with no expectation of a positive review.
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LibraryThing member LLPoland
This book is wonderfully written. It is also full of black and white photographs which adds beauty, interest, and information. It is an Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children Honor Book for 2013. It is written in a very powerful way because it gives insights on the personal
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lives of these young children. More than just facts and dates, readers become engrossed in the history, strife, and perseverance that surrounded this time of segregation in America. The captions, sidebars, photographs, and documents add amazing detail and increased emotion.
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LibraryThing member kschorn
A really enlightening view of the Civil Rights Movement as seen through the eyes of child protesters in Birmingham Alabama. Good to use in a Civil Rights unit because it offers many different perspectives.
LibraryThing member Sullywriter
A thoroughly informative, completely engrossing, and truly inspiring account of how the children of Birmingham saved the civil rights movement from failure in that city. Levinson's narrative is particularly notable for chronicling the heroic actions of four young protestors. This is an excellent
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companion read to Larry Dane Brimner's Black and White.
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LibraryThing member amaraduende
I got almost to the end of this on my road trip, but not quite. Since I suck at making time for audiobooks in non-road-trip mode, I doubt I'll finish it. I had a hard time keeping the dates and people straight in my head - something I don't think would have been hard while reading when you can
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glance around. Good narrator. Touching stories, very interesting insight into the events.. but something kept it from grabbing me.

Narrator gets a 3, too.
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LibraryThing member abbylibrarian
Yes, this is a book about the Birmingham Children's March of 1963, but it's also a really rich resource on civil rights in general. There were many civil rights demonstrations that led up to the Children's March - sit-ins at lunch counters, ride-ins on segregated buses, marches and parades by
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adults - none of which really had the desired effect. This is an important book, not only for telling a little-known story, but for telling a story about kids and teens making a difference. The story of the Birmingham Children's March clearly illustrates that kids can make a difference and sometimes their efforts are essential.

Ervin Ross's narration is steady and clear and it fits the content nicely. This past year I've gotten into NPR and I'm enjoying listening to nonfiction audiobooks all the more (they're like long NPR episodes! You learn so much!). A very nice feature of the audiobook is that parts of Cynthia Levinson's recorded interviews with the featured activists are included. It was great to hear them talking about their experiences in their own words after reading about them in the book.
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LibraryThing member Je2nif4
Book: We’ve Got A Job: The 1963 Children’s March
Author: Cynthia Levinson
Characters: The children in the March in Birmingham Alabama, individual stories retold from Audrey, Wash, Arnetta and James.
Setting: 1963 in Birmingham, Alabama
Theme: Civil Rights, doing what’s right
Genre:
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Non-fiction
Audience: ages 11 +
Curriculum: Great non-fiction book that can be used for black history month, add on the challenges of doing what’s right, and the power that youth have when adults are lacking the conviction and courage to do it.
Summary: Historical moments in history are often great battles of men fighting in war and coming out victorious. This book focuses on the children in Birmingham, AL who answered Dr. Martin Luther King’s call to action to ‘fill the jails’ of their city during the most racial times of US history. It was a pivotal moment that initiated change and repealed segregation laws in Alabama.
Personal Response: Such a moving book that gives a deeper insight on such violent and moving times in US history. The book recounts the children’s March in May of 1963 and drills down into the personal stories of four young people who played a role in the march. I like that this book came out to remind young people of the history of the civil rights movement and to give them insight of the power of their voices even as teens, is in deed powerful especially in masses.
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LibraryThing member Megs_Scrambled
This thick, text heavy book chronicles the march and arrest hundreds of children in 1963 Birmingham, AL. The children wanted to help end segregation in Birmingham, so they decided to protest as well. The story is told from four different children who participated and were subsequently arrested.
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It's a bit text heavy, but the font is large and the language easy enough for a 10 or 11 year old to understand. This would be a welcome addition to any lessons or discussions around civil rights--and one kids can relate to and be empowered by.
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LibraryThing member candr
5Q,3P (my Voya codes)
This book unveils a rich and powerful piece of Civil Rights history that I never knew existed. Through the telling of personal experiences and anecdotes we learn of four African American youth who grew up in Birmingham, Alabama during a time of tense segregation and racism.
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Audrey, Wash, James and Arnetta share with the world their participation in the 1963 Birmingham Children's March and other Civil Rights movements that eventually contributed to positive action and integration. Interwoven with black and white photos and explanations of the larger regional and national civil rights movements, I found this book engaging and the experiences and stories powerful and courageous.

The only drawback I find with this book is its format and size. It can be deceiving as it looks and is formatted like a text book but is full of a wealth of interesting and page turning information and history. If you can look past its presentation, especially if trying to engage a young person's interest, this is a must for anybody to read.
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LibraryThing member natalie.loy
We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March by Cynthia Levinson is a story about school children who participated in marches during the civil rights movement in the 1960’s. The story centers on elementary, middle school, and high school students who voluntarily participated in
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marches to Birmingham, Alabama in May 1963 knowing there was a high probability they would be arrested and jailed. Through the spraying of fire hoses and being thrown against buildings, the children marched on and succeeded in contributing to the desegregation of one of the biggest segregated cities in the South.
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LibraryThing member Karen59
I stayed up all night to read this breathtaking, informative and inspirational book about the Birmingham Children's March in Birmingham, Alabama. This beautifully written and photographed book tells the story of the 4,000 children who integrated Birmingham after the adults, feeling frightened of
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violence and probable loss of livelihoods, stopped protesting with Dr. Martin King Jr. and other clergy. Facing violence, expulsion from school, threats to their parents lives, and the killing of 4 little girls from a bomb planted at church by white supremacists, the children of Birmingham continued to march and protest until they won significant concessions from Bull Conner and the white power structure. It also frankly discusses the use of non-violent and violent tactics used by the Black community to protect themselves, a topic that is not often discussed. This book for older children, teens and adults inspires us to fight for what is right, and gives us courage for the journey.
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LibraryThing member Eesil
I got a free copy of this book from Netgalley. I selected it because it deals with an event in history that I knew very little about -- the protests and jailing of children and teenagers in Birmingham during the civil rights movement. It is aimed at young readers and focuses on the involvement of 4
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kids. I gave "We've got a job" 4 stars for its content. The history is fascinating and disturbing. The narrative of how those few days unfolded conveys the complexity of the tension between and within various groups. The desperation and cleverness of having kids voluntarily fill the jails is especially astonishing. In the grand scheme of things, 50 years is not that long ago and the resistance to desegregation is jaw dropping from my perspective in urban Canada. As a book, it could do with a bit of editing -- especially if the intended audience are children. At times, it was an arduous read because it seemed like a lengthy listing of facts and events with little comment or broader historical context. But it was well worth the read and ultimately very moving.
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LibraryThing member ThisIsNotSophie
This work of nonfiction incorporates the stories of four young people and historical photographs to help young readers better understand their nonviolent fight to end racial segregation in 1963. The goal was to confront white Birmingham through a series of peaceful protests such as lunch counter
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sit-ins, store picketing, and marches. Levinson does a masterful job combining a fast-paced narrative featuring the lives of real African American youth protesters, along with an overarching discussion of the key historical events and activities. By weaving the experiences of the four youth into the story, the author helps readers feel the events come to life. The book concludes with the “afterworld” providing a glimpse into the lives of Audrey, Wash, James, and Arnetta since their involvement in the Children’s March. An author’s note, timeline, map, notes, bibliography, and index are also included.
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LibraryThing member flackm
This book is an account of how 4,000 students (elementary-high school) volunteered to march and go to jail in Birmingham, Alabama in 1963. It shows the power of children in making change where adults may fail. Through the voices of four of the participants we are privy to an account of the events
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before, during, and after their march and jail time. This is worth examining and sharing with students!
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LibraryThing member flackm
This book is an account of how 4,000 students (elementary-high school) volunteered to march and go to jail in Birmingham, Alabama in 1963. It shows the power of children in making change where adults may fail. Through the voices of four of the participants we are privy to an account of the events
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before, during, and after their march and jail time. This is worth examining and sharing with students!
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LibraryThing member Salsabrarian
Narrated by Ervin Ross. The author interviewed four adults who were involved in civil rights protests in Birmingham, Alabama, as teenagers. Through their recollections and the author's research, it is quite a story of the fight against injustice and for equality. For children to step up where
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adults feared to tread was pretty amazing. There was nobility in the protest, but ugliness, too, as several people, including Wash chose to act violently, against civil rights leaders' wishes. Ross narrates in a terse, factual tone befitting the history. Excerpts of recorded interviews are included.
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LibraryThing member JCLHeatherM
Told from the primary point of view of 4 youths in the Children's March, the book may have been better serviced in focusing on one or two perspectives as the primary narrators. There is so much to read and enjoy, but there is such a thing as overload which undermines the beauty of the event, all
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painstakingly real.
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Language

Physical description

176 p.; 9.4 inches

ISBN

1561456276 / 9781561456277
Page: 1.0089 seconds