Flugan i katedralen : hur en liten grupp vetenskapsmän från Cambridge vann kapplöpningen om att först lyckas klyva atomen

by Brian Cathcart

Other authorsManne Svensson
Paper Book, 2006

Status

Available

Call number

539.7

Publication

Stockholm : Santérus, 2006

Description

"Re-creating the frustrations, excitement, and obsessions of 1932, the "miracle year" of British physics, Brian Cathcart reveals in rich detail the astonishing story behind the splitting of the atom. The most celebrated scientific experiment of its time, it would help open the way toward one of mankind's most devastating inventions - the atomic bomb."--Jacket.

User reviews

LibraryThing member tgraettinger
Good, relatively brief history of the Cavendish during the late 1920's and early 1930's - Rutherford, Chadwick, Gamow, and the main players - Cockroft and Walton. Made me wonder how difficult it might be today to repeat their experiments to "split the atom" in my garage or barn (with modern
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materials, of course).
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LibraryThing member jasonlf
A well researched, well told story of the Cavendish lab and the work that culminated in the discovery of the neutron and the splitting of the atom in the early 1930s. Experimentation gets short shrift in histories of science as compared to theory, but Ernest Rutherford is as interesting as just
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about any theorist and using a simple apparatus to essentially visualize the atom itself as Rutherford did in his scattering experiment is about as impressive as any theoretical feat. This book takes those as its prelude and focuses on Walton, Cockcroft and to a lesser degree Chadwick and Rutherford's ongoing role.

In the process, the book tells the interesting story of the inception of larger scale experimentation that moved beyond tabletop experiments by gentleman scientists to large machinery using large amounts of energy and teams of researchers.

The book is more thoroughly researched journalistic history that delves more deeply into the engineering complexities of building the apparatus than into nuclear physics itself, the only reason for not giving it a full five stars.
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LibraryThing member nosajeel
A well researched, well told story of the Cavendish lab and the work that culminated in the discovery of the neutron and the splitting of the atom in the early 1930s. Experimentation gets short shrift in histories of science as compared to theory, but Ernest Rutherford is as interesting as just
Show More
about any theorist and using a simple apparatus to essentially visualize the atom itself as Rutherford did in his scattering experiment is about as impressive as any theoretical feat. This book takes those as its prelude and focuses on Walton, Cockcroft and to a lesser degree Chadwick and Rutherford's ongoing role.

In the process, the book tells the interesting story of the inception of larger scale experimentation that moved beyond tabletop experiments by gentleman scientists to large machinery using large amounts of energy and teams of researchers.

The book is more thoroughly researched journalistic history that delves more deeply into the engineering complexities of building the apparatus than into nuclear physics itself, the only reason for not giving it a full five stars.
Show Less

Awards

Language

Original language

English

Physical description

356 p.; 23 cm

ISBN

9189449770 / 9789189449770
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