The Legend of the Candy Cane (Board Book)

by Lori Walburg

Other authorsPat Matuszak (Adapter), James Bernardin (Illustrator)
Board book, 2002

Status

Check shelf

Call number

E Wa

Publication

Zonderkidz (2002), Board book, 28 pages

Description

With the help of a little girl, a mysterious stranger tells the story of the candy cane to the people of a small prairie town during Christmas time at the turn of the century.

Local notes

1011-53

User reviews

LibraryThing member Tmtrvlr
This book was a bit disappointing. The illustrations are very old fashioned, which is quaint, but rather unappealing and comes off a bit odd. The story tries to ascribe religious meaning to the shape and colors of the candy cane.

The story explains that the shape J is for Jesus and flipped the other
Show More
way, for the shepherd’s staff. They then assign the colors to give them a religious meaning. The assign red for the beating that made Jesus blood run down like red stripes and white for being washed clean from Jesus’ forgiveness. It appears that this has been toned down in words and illustrations from previous versions, but it still is a concept that small children will not understand. The thing that concerned me the most is that while the book is labeled for ages 4-8, this is a board book which is usually given to younger children 1-4.

I do not recommend this book for below age 4 and probably would raise that age up a little. I would recommend the parent read the book first, and decide if your child is ready for the content.

I received this book from the BookLook blogger program in exchange for an honest review.
Show Less
LibraryThing member taterzngravy
This Christmas story is a story within a story. The story has charm and I would even say magic, the type of which Chrristmas is made. The illustrations evoke the time period in which it is set, the late 1800s.
LibraryThing member sagrundman
This fiction story tells the legend of the Candy Cane and tries to remind a town of the real meaning of Christmas. A small town gets a new storekeeper. Each member of the town is wishing for a certain type of store, but the children wish the hardest. The store turns out to be a candy store. A
Show More
little girl goes to help the candy man with setting up his store and is taught the message of the Candy Cane, which they then go and share with all in the town. This brings happiness and joy to the town just in time for Christmas. The books is a very easy read-out loud book. The best part are the illustrations, which are paintings. Each image conveys the story. Most have people in them and the illustrator made the expressions exaggerated to help push the emotions that the characters would be feeling at the moment. This book has a throughly Christian message, so it may not be a good book to read out loud in a class. However, if a teacher is doing a unit on different holidays and their symbols, this would be a good book to use. It also helps to remind those of us who are Christians, the real meaning of Christmas that tends to get lost in the all wrappings and bows. Recommended for ages 4 and up.
Show Less
LibraryThing member allawishus
This was an explicityly religious Christmas story about a town that gets a new candy store (that's kind of incongrous, ha ha). The owner of the candy story tells a little girl about the origin of the candy cane. They then deliver candy canes to all the townspeople and invite them to the grand
Show More
opening of the store.

I'm not sure I'm happy with the idea that the red stripe in a candy cane represents Jesus' blood, but whatever! That definitely has more to do with the idea of eating dried blood than anything else. This would probably make a nice Christmas story at a Sunday school or in a Christian school setting.

I did really like the illustrations, which are sort of Norman Rockwell-esque at times. There's a nice one of the little girl opening a giant box filled with lots of different types of candy that I drooled over. It's sort of odd, but it almost looks like the cover illustration was done by a different artist altogether. Weird.
Show Less
LibraryThing member TaraThompson
Kids will love the quaint, simple
story of how a man and a little
girl brought the joy of christmas
to those around them by something
as simple as a piece of candy.
(10+)
LibraryThing member sbigger
This fiction story tells the legend of the Candy Cane and tries to remind a town of the real meaning of Christmas. A small town gets a new storekeeper. Each member of the town is wishing for a certain type of store, but the children wish the hardest. The store turns out to be a candy store. A
Show More
little girl goes to help the candy man with setting up his store and is taught the message of the Candy Cane, which they then go and share with all in the town. This brings happiness and joy to the town just in time for Christmas. The books is a very easy read-out loud book. The best part are the illustrations, which are paintings. Each image conveys the story. Most have people in them and the illustrator made the expressions exaggerated to help push the emotions that the characters would be feeling at the moment. This book has a throughly Christian message, so it may not be a good book to read out loud in a class. However, if a teacher is doing a unit on different holidays and their symbols, this would be a good book to use. It also helps to remind those of us who are Christians, the real meaning of Christmas that tends to get lost in the all wrappings and bows. Recommended for ages 4 and up.
Show Less
LibraryThing member alekee
What a sweet interesting book The Legend of the Candy Cane is even though is geared for toddlers, it kept the attention of my nine year old. The book is made of hard cardboard, and great for little hands to carry around.
The book is beautifully illustrated with bright colors, and the children
Show More
noticed the dog and cat in the pictures. The boys wished they could be Lucy and help unpack all that candy; a child’s dream comes true.
When it came time to tell the legend of the Candy Cane, they were enthralled at the story, and sad about Jesus blood being represented by the red and white stripe. They have looked this book over and over, and are able to read a lot of the words themselves. This one is a real keeper for the Christmas Season, right on our coffee table.

I received this book from Booklook Bloggers of Harper Collins Christian Book Publishers, and was not required to give a positive review.
Show Less
LibraryThing member stpetersucc
One dark night a stranger rides into a small town. Who is he? Why has he come? The townspeople wish he were a doctor, a dressmaker, or a trader. But the children have the greatest wish of all, a deep, quiet, secret wish.
LibraryThing member blbooks
First sentence: One dreary evening in the depths of November a stranger rode into town. He stopped his horse in front of a lonely storefront. The windows were boarded shut and the door was locked fast. But the man looked at it, smiled, and said, "It will do."

Premise/plot: This is a picture book
Show More
"origin" story for the popular Christmas treat, the candy cane. Children learn from a candy maker (candy shop owner) the spiritual significance and symbolism used in the candy cane.

My thoughts: I liked this one well enough. I do love candy canes (though it is an extremely rare treat these days). I have heard most of these before though that might just be because I read this twenty-five years ago.
Show Less

Language

Original publication date

1997

Physical description

28 p.; 6.9 x 5.92 inches

ISBN

0310704472 / 9780310704478

UPC

025986704476

Barcode

34747000061891
Page: 0.8981 seconds