A.D. 30: A Novel

Paperback

Status

Available

Call number

813.54

Series

Publication

Center Street

Original publication date

2014-10-28

Description

"A sweeping epic set in the harsh deserts of Arabia and ancient Palestine. A war that rages between kingdoms on the earth and in the heart. The harrowing journey of the woman at the center of it all. Step back in time to the year of our Lord...A.D. 30. The outcast daughter of one of the most powerful Bedouin sheikhs in Arabia, Maviah is called on to protect the very people who rejected her. When their enemies launch a sudden attack with devastating consequences, Maviah escapes with the help of two of her father's warriors--Saba who speaks more with his sword than his voice and Judah, a Jew who comes from a tribe that can read the stars. Their journey will be fraught with terrible danger. If they can survive the vast forbidding sands of a desert that is deadly to most, they will reach a brutal world subjugated by kings and emperors. There Maviah must secure an unlikely alliance with King Herod of the Jews. But Maviah's path leads her unexpectedly to another man. An enigmatic teacher who speaks of a way in this life which offers greater power than any kingdom. His name is Yeshua, and his words turn everything known on its head. Though following him may present even greater danger, his may be the only way for Maviah to save her people--and herself"--… (more)

Awards

INSPY (Winner — Mystery/Thriller — 2015)

Language

Original language

English

ISBN

1455588768 / 9781455588763

User reviews

LibraryThing member Simmy905
I received a free copy of this novel in exchange for my honest review.

A.D. 30 is the amazing story of Maviah, daughter of Rami bin Malik, a powerful Bedouin sheikh. The Thalmud have overthrown Rami, cut his tongue and held him prisoner. Maviah is his only hold, and she also wants to avenge her
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son’s brutal murder. Her journey from the Arabian Desert to Rome is not only physical but a very emotional one. Her two warrior guards, Saba, a Bedu, and Judah, a Jew, are her only traveling companions. Judah’s faith in God peaks her curiosity, who is this remarkable man his forefathers spoke of?

This story takes you back in time to the days of Jesus. Maviah is a woman we can all relate with in one way or another. She learns about having complete faith in our heavenly father, first through Judah, then through her own experience. Ted Dekker did a remarkable job tying the story to scripture. I was extremely moved and blessed by this book and you will too.
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LibraryThing member jolerie
His brothers thought Yeshua out of his mind, but they do not know him. One cannot truly know my son and remain unchanged. Perhaps the world will see that one day. But today I fear they will try to kill him. Pg. 132

Maviah, born into shame, lives with shame, and endures a lifetime of shame simply
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because she is the result of an illicit relationship and most of all because she is a woman. Denied by her father, disowned by her own people, she must find the strength within herself to rise above the shackles in her life, a devastating attack by a rival tribe, and a loss that cuts to her core to bring salvation to her people. Her journey will bring her face to face with a man some call a prophet, a madman, a teacher, but to her, only Master. She was born a lowly slave but will rise to become Queen of the desert and what she learns is that sometimes, faith is only a beginning.

Dekker is once again returning to what he does best - to tell a good story filled with characters that draw you in and keep you captivated. Weaving strong biblical themes with a plot driven story is the signature trademark of a Dekker book and A.D. 30 is no exception. Maviah's strength, courage and perseverance makes her both endearing and memorable. Although there were brief moments of lag in the story, the overall experience was enjoyable. I look forward to the next installment in the series.
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LibraryThing member RayleighAnn
*Please beware of two things; one, my review is record length and two; this book has a sequel that is not published yet! =-0

QUICK OVERVIEW: I never use “texting talk” on the computer, but right now, this is the only thing that can express my excitement…..OMG U HAVE TO BUY A COPY NOW LOL!!!!!
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:-) :-) :-) :-) This is by far the best book (aside from the Bible) that I have ever read and DO NOT take that statement lightly! A.D 30 has something that no other fictional book has, an intimate experience that brings you closer to God and opens your eyes to see Jesus for who He is, and to see yourself for who you are, His child. All the while reading a story full of adventure, betrayal, action, romance, and everything a good fictional book needs.

SPIRITUAL CONCERNS/PRAISES:Just in case you do not know, “Yeshua” is the Jewish name for “Jesus”, thus, the main (fictional) character, Maviah, meets Jesus and many of the great historians of the Bible. At first I was slightly hesitant on reading a book that was so courageously published, for fear that it may not live up to its full potential or would possibly be incorrect, however it far exceeded it’s limits! I loved (LOVED) that Dekker did not fictionalize anything about Jesus to bring Him to Maviah, instead, he wove Maviah’s story around Jesus. “Yeshua” never said anything that was not written in the Bible, He was not apart of a miracle that was not mentioned in the Bible, and He did not have a personality different from what is said about Him in the Bible. Dekker did an AMAZING job at this, I can’t even begin to explain that. Dekker also brought understanding to some of Jesus’ parables, by way of Maviah reflecting on them herself, or by her speaking to someone else.

CHARACTERS:A.D 30 is written in first person by Maviah, giving the book the necessary emotional affects, as well as giving those who read, a chance to relate to her. Maviah would be considered the “gentile” of the story, I think I place Saba as a “gentile” as well, as he did not believe in any god (Maviah believed in them all). Judah however is the Jew, and Dekker did a great job of making him earnest in meeting “Yeshua”, yet gave him the mindset of most Jews during Jesus’ time on the earth, expecting Him to rise up against the Romans in war.

QUESTIONABLE CONTENT: There is one cuss word that sincerely took me by surprise, as none of the other books I have read by Ted have had any whatsoever. The word is b*****d and it is said roughly 3 times. Judah also swears his allegiance more than once on many different things and Maviah curses everything she knows in one scene. There is also lots of fighting and kissing, however no sex scenes whatsoever.

CONCLUSION: Once again, I loved this book! Christians, you will love this book! I promise, it will not disappoint! This is the book that Dekker has been waiting for, the one that will have influence beyond any of his other books, I can only imagine the power it holds should it be made into a movie! I rate it 10 out of 5 stars!

“Thanks to Sara Pence for reaching out to me for the reviewing and provision of this book. All comments and opinions are reserved as my own.”
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LibraryThing member wareagle78
An outcast woman fines personal strength and freedom when she meets and trusts in Jesus.
LibraryThing member debs4jc
An amazing and thought provoking depiction of an Arabian woman's life changing encounter with Yeshua.
Maviah is the daughter of an Arab Sheik--but not honored by him or her people as she was the daughter of his mistress, not his wife. However when her father is attacked by a neighboring tribe he is
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forced to come to her for help. He wants her to go to Galilee and make a request of King Herod Antipas. Maviah, accompanied by Judah, who is of Jewish descent, and Saba, her father's best warrior sets out on a harrowing journey across the desert, a journey where they must avoid their enemies. This leads them into the most dangerous part of the desert where they barely manage to survive. Then upon arriving in Palestine they somehow have to gain an audience with King Herod Antipas and convince the wily leader to help them in their quest. Judah, however, is distracted by tales of a new Jewish teacher--Yeshua--who he believes is the king his people once followed a star to find when he was first born.
I was swept along by the adventurous aspects of this story--the details about how they traveled in the desert and survived were fascinating. I wasn't impressed by the implausibility of a woman being sent on such a mission and how some of the political machinations worked out, though the characters of Herod and Phasaelis seem perfectly suited to what we know from history. As for what happens when Yeshua (Jesus) enters the story, His words and actions fit the Biblical narrative, as does the extraordinary effect he has on his listeners. The climax of the book, when Maviah must confront her fears in front of an audience of Bedouins and a dramatic miracle occurs was nail-biting to read--but also thought provoking as to the necessity of such a dramatic intervention by God. However the inner workings of Maviah's mind and spirit as she responds to the words of Yeshua and learns to trust Him are the true drama of the boo. Her spiritual journey will live long in my mind. Her adventures will continue in Dekker's next book, one I will eagerly seek out as the ending of this one leaves quite a few situations unresolved.
For well written Biblical fiction, go no further. For a story of adventure, intrigue, and spiritual awakening I highly recommend reading or listening to this book.
BTW, I listened to the audiobook version narrated by Ellen Archer, her feminine voice was well suited to become Maviiah--which is important as Maviah narrates the entire story--yet she was also able to subtly become the voices of Herod, Judah, Saba, and even Yeshua when those characters spoke. I highly recommend the audiobook for a great listening experience.
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LibraryThing member jfe16
In a historical epic set in Palestine and the surrounding harsh and unforgiving deserts, Maviah, an outcast Bedouin slave, tells her painful and heartbreaking story as she is compelled to defend the family that rejected her. Spurred to action by a tragic event, she and two slaves undertake a
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dangerous journey across deadly deserts to strike a deal with King Herod. But when Maviah meets Yeshua, her life is changed; she knows she has looked into the face of someone “more than a mere man.”

Powerfully combining fiction with Biblical fact, with an amazing sense of place, this is a book to be read for its depth of spirituality and emotion, its character development, its astounding storyline. The depiction of the crossing of the desert is so powerful readers are likely to feel the grit of the sand and the agony of thirst. Insightful and captivating, this story will keep readers captivated to the very last page.

Highly recommended.
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LibraryThing member vintagebeckie
I have read a lot of Ted Dekker’s books. He has a unique way of exploring spiritual truths, and A.D. 30 is no exception. For those of you who are expecting a speculative novel, you may be a bit surprised. With a setting of 2000+ years ago, this novel fits the historical genre, yet has aspects of
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suspense, while incorporating some mystical elements as well. I found the audiobook riveting, making this one hard to turn off. It is definitely a recommended read.

Maviah has been shuttled around from birth. Her mother’s origins and her father’s disdain forced her into slavery in Egypt at a very young age. Reluctantly her father brings her back to his household, but it is an uneasy relationship. Maviah is an outcast and could have easily slipped into the role of victim. But her tenacious spirit and her desire for justice drive her on a dangerous journey through the Middle East to the royal courts of Palestine and an encounter with Yeshua, a prophet who seemingly speaks in riddles.

Maviah is an interesting character. A true outcast, she is also intelligent and shrewd with a mother’s heart that remains open and tender despite the battering it takes. Her first person account lets the reader into all she experiences. The setting runs from the Arabian desert to the courts of Herod Antipas to the cities beside the Sea of Galilee — familiar settings for those who read the Bible, yet in Dekker’s hands are exotic and dangerous. Complex characterization is a big plus in this novel, with Dekker’s portrayal of Jesus the most intriguing. I was often reminded of Jesus’ question to his disciples — Who do you say I am? (Mark 8:29), because of the various reactions from the other characters. A.D. 30 explores God’s role as a true father, the nature of God’s Kingdom, what forgiveness looks like and what it means to really see. Because of the many elements of this novel — rich in historical detail and suspense-filled — I think it has a wide appeal. The reader for the audiobook did a great job as well. All in all, I really, really enjoyed this book!

Highly Recommended.

Audience: adults.

(I purchased this book from Audible. All opinions expressed are mine alone.)
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LibraryThing member longhorndaniel
It was different. Enjoyable but the pace was really really slow; I loved the message of the story but the storyline itself just never completely enthralled me.
LibraryThing member jepeters333
A sweeping epic set in the harsh deserts of Arabia and ancient Palestine
A war that rages between kingdoms on the earth and in the heart.

The harrowing journey of the woman at the center of it all.

Step back in time to the year of our Lord...A.D. 30.

The outcast daughter of one of the most powerful
Show More
Bedouin sheikhs in Arabia, Maviah is called on to protect the very people who rejected her. When their enemies launch a sudden attack with devastating consequences, Maviah escapes with the help of two of her father's warriors--Saba who speaks more with is sword than his voice and Judah, a Jew who comes from a tribe that can read the stars. Their journey will be fraught with terrible danger. If they can survive the vast forbidding sands of a desert that is deadly to most, they will reach a brutal world subjugated by kings and emperors. There Maviah must secure an unlikely alliance with King Herod of the Jews.

But Maviah's path leads her unexpectedly to another man. An enigmatic teacher who speaks of a way in this life which offers greater power than any kingdom. His name is Yeshua, and his words turn everything known on its head. Though following him may present even greater danger, his may be the only way for Maviah to save her people--and herself.
Show Less
LibraryThing member NadineC.Keels
Though Maviah is the daughter of a powerful Bedouin sheikh, she's been an enslaved outcast for most of her life. However, when her people are viciously attacked, it's up to her to go seek an alliance with the ruler of Galilee, Herod the Tetrarch. But Maviah's dangerous task leads her into the path
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of a compassionate teacher and mystifying mystic, Yeshua, and that encounter could change everything in A.D. 30 by author Ted Dekker.

While this novel has been on my radar for years, it didn't make it onto my mental TBR list until I found out what perspective the story comes from. That of an Arab heroine who may even be considered a queen. Her perilous journey through desert sands with two warrior allies, and the epic scope of the novel (including but beyond the confines of a simple "Jesus" tale), romanced me as I read.

I must admit that, oftentimes, in historical/biblical stories that have a Gospel theme or thread where Jesus appears, his character and scenes are usually what I like least about the story. Perhaps it's that, in the necessary effort to respect a Son of God portrayal, his character becomes clichéd in fiction.

It's as if, because he's a sinless man, he must also come off as a perfect guy. A guy whose weirdness is even perfect. The main character will likely know the Jesus character is looking right into his/her soul the first time he/she locks eyes with him, and he'll probably never have to scratch an inch through his beard or clear a tickle in his throat or recover after telling a joke that falls flat—because he's the Jesus character. Yeshua didn't really break out of the cliché for me in this novel.

And I'm glad I didn't read the author's introduction until after I read the story. I'd say the intro does a little too much prompting and explaining before letting the story unfold and speak for itself.

Yet, besides the intrigue and harrowing aspects of this poignantly rendered epic, what made it an amazing read for me was the space it gave me to wrestle with mysteries, as the Way is indeed a mysterious one. And I couldn't have predicted every turn in Maviah's journey, which is quite a plus.

I'm looking forward to moving right on to A.D. 33.
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LibraryThing member YoelaO
I love Ted Dekker's work! This book made me revisit some of Jesus' teaching in the Bible and look at it from the perspective of someone yearning for unconditional love like Christ Jesus'.

This book is about a young woman named Maviah who is shunned as an illegitimate daughter of the Bedouin sheikh.
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She is constantly reminded that she is nothing and no one loves her nor cares for her. But when her people are attacked by enemies, her father calls on her to journey across the unforgiving desert with two of his most trusted warriors, Saba and Judah, to ask for Rome's aid. Throughout the journey Maviah continues to doubt herself, until she meets Yeshua and He begins to change her mind. But going to Rome doesn't even begin to solve Maviah's problem and she ends up in even more danger and has to make choices that could be the death of her, Saba, and Judah.

Throughout the book I am draw to Maviah and the inner battle she constantly fights in. As someone who also struggles with self-confidence and self-worth, I could relate to Maviah (even though I haven't been through anything even close to what she went through). I thoroughly enjoyed this book and look forward to reading the next one.
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LibraryThing member impactwriter
I was wrong about A.D. 30.

I prejudged this book. I did not read the back cover, I only based my desire to read it on the front. I assumed that this would be a re-hash of Jesus' life. Now, before I go any further, let me say that I love Jesus with all of my heart. It's just that I didn't want to
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read another person's interpretation of the Gospels.

This book certainly took me back to the time when Jesus walked the earth, but it began in the deserts of the pre-Muslim world, in the cultures of the Bedouin. I was grabbed by the story from the outset.

While I'm no expert in the era and people of the day, I will say that Ted Dekker created an intense story filled with fractious and captivating cultures. I'm sure a lot of research went into this story.

I'm looking forward to resuming the adventure with A.D. 33 in the very near future.
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