Tristan: With the Surviving Fragments of the 'Tristan of Thomas'

by Gottfried von Strassburg

Other authorsA. T. Hatto (Translator), A. T. Hatto (Introduction)
Paperback, 1960

Status

Available

Call number

808

Genres

Collection

Publication

Penguin Classics (1960), Paperback, 384 pages

Description

One of the great romances of the Middle Ages, Tristan, written in the early thirteenth century, is based on a medieval love story of grand passion and deceit. By slaying a dragon, the young prince Tristan wins the beautiful Isolde's hand in marriage for his uncle, King Mark. On their journey back to Mark's court, however, the pair mistakenly drink a love-potion intended for the king and his young bride, and are instantly possessed with an all-consuming love for each another - a love they are compelled to conceal by a series of subterfuges that culminates in tragedy. Von Strassburg's work is acknowledged as the greatest rendering of this legend of medieval lovers, and went on to influence generations of writers and artists and inspire Richard Wagner's Tristan and Isolde.… (more)

User reviews

LibraryThing member edella
FF: One of the great romances of the Middle Ages, Tristan, written in the early thirteenth century, is based on a medieval love story of grand passion and deceit. By slaying a dragon, the young prince Tristan wins the beautiful Isolde’s hand in marriage for his uncle, King Mark. On their journey back to Mark’s court, however, the pair mistakenly drink a love-potion intended for the king and his young bride, and are instantly possessed with an all-consuming love for each another - a love they are compelled to conceal by a series of subterfuges that culminates in tragedy. Von Strassburg’s work is acknowledged as the greatest rendering of this legend of medieval lovers, and went on to influence generations of writers and artists and inspire Richard Wagner’s Tristan and Isolde.… (more)
LibraryThing member Shuffy2
Forget Lancelot and Guenivere, Tristan and Isolde are the original Romeo and Juliet! Gottfried caries on the romatic tradition and creates a love tringle between Isolde, Tristan, and King Marke. The legend of the doomed lovers unfolds in the classic tradition that ends (albeit abruptly) in tragedy. Gottfried's poem is unfinished but the book also contains the translation of Thomas' "Tristan" as well. The book omits the connection to the Court of King Arthur but it does not detract from the legend. This book is closer to Beroul's Tristan and the 2006 movie staring Franco, Myles, and Sewell than the 15th century "Le Morte D'Arthur" by Malory. I recommend this version of the tale over all the others I've read!… (more)
LibraryThing member Caitdub
I'm not a huge fan of medieval lit; however, out of all of the books I read in this class, Tristan was my favorite. The movie came out a few months after I read the book, which was great entertainment. The movie was so bad, all I did was laugh through it.

Language

Original language

German

Original publication date

13th century

Physical description

384 p.; 7.72 inches

ISBN

0140440984 / 9780140440980

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